Jump to content
MrsSurvival Discussion Forums
  • entries
    14
  • comments
    48
  • views
    577

Dinner at Grandma Mary's

Sign in to follow this  
Rezgirl

255 views

Thursday evening we dined at Grandma Mary's house. This was quite a treat, since it had been many years since I put my feet under her table for a meal. In our family, Grandma's dinners are legendary. When my biological Grandmother died, I was very young and have only a few faint memories of her. Grandpap remarried, and Grandma Mary has been a wonderful blessing to our whole family. There is no evil step-mother in our family.

The table is set with the Nortake china, (Fairmont pattern) and Fostoria glass. It is beautiful. The main attraction however, is the FOOD. The woman goes all out. If you leave hungry, you have only yourself to blame. When Grandpap was still living, He would hone his big knife and carve the meat in his snow white butcher apron. After grace, he's announce, "Reach in and make yourself homely." Then he'd unfold his napkin, tuck a corner into his collar, pick up his knife and fork and eat with a purpose. The man loved good food. He was a grocer.

 

gallery_4560_28_448415.jpg

 

gallery_4560_28_706158.jpg

 

gallery_4560_28_669874.jpg

 

gallery_4560_28_500600.jpg

 

The menu this evening is:

 

Bread sticks, Italian favored with cheese

Caultiflower & broccoli salad

Mashed potatoes

Turkey slices

Gravy

Pickles

Deviled Eggs

Peas

Potato Chips

Fruit salad

Lemon Dessert

 

At this point, my brother leans over to my 14 yr old foster son and whispers, "When you think you've had some of everything on the table, Grandma brings out more from the kitchen" And he was right. A cake like bar with chocolate topping appeared. Then the candy dish was passed. After dinner, more Aunts, Uncles and Cousins came by for the weekly Thursday evening vist at Grandma's. Before we left for the evening, she served pretzels and chips.

 

Grandma Mary's eyesight is failing to the point that she cannot drive.

Sign in to follow this  


4 Comments


Recommended Comments

My eyes grew misty with memories at this. :yar:

 

It reminded me of the holidays and summers at my grandma's house growing up. Grandpa and Grandma were only about 20 minutes away and so we visited often. Grandma didn't need an excuse to invite people over. The first sunny weekend of Summer she set forth the mandate that there would be 'dinner'. Everyone was expected to show and bring something. No fair showing up right at dinner time and leaving right after, either. You were expected to do your share.

 

Winter or summer, the table literally groaned with food. We had meat, potatoes, stuffing (if Thanksgiving), salads, a hot veggie, and at least 2 kinds of dessert. If it was the winter, we used the good china. If summer, we used paper or plastic.

 

As I got older, I began to help more in the kitchen and learned her secrets. To this day though, I can't replicate her fried chicken.

 

Thanks for the sweet memories and never mind the tears in my eyes. They're from the good, treasured, precious things. Thank you.

 

:bighug2:

 

 

Share this comment


Link to comment
My eyes grew misty with memories at this. :yar:

 

It reminded me of the holidays and summers at my grandma's house growing up. Grandpa and Grandma were only about 20 minutes away and so we visited often. Grandma didn't need an excuse to invite people over. The first sunny weekend of Summer she set forth the mandate that there would be 'dinner'. Everyone was expected to show and bring something. No fair showing up right at dinner time and leaving right after, either. You were expected to do your share.

 

Winter or summer, the table literally groaned with food. We had meat, potatoes, stuffing (if Thanksgiving), salads, a hot veggie, and at least 2 kinds of dessert. If it was the winter, we used the good china. If summer, we used paper or plastic.

 

As I got older, I began to help more in the kitchen and learned her secrets. To this day though, I can't replicate her fried chicken.

 

Thanks for the sweet memories and never mind the tears in my eyes. They're from the good, treasured, precious things. Thank you.

 

:bighug2:

 

 

 

:bighug2:

 

They are indeed the good, treasured, precious things, well said.

I believe that the older we get, the more we appreciate a wonderful childhood. Especially when I see so many children who have a rotten family life.

Share this comment


Link to comment

What a blessing to read this wonderful account this morning! Thank you so much for sharing it with us. As you know, I spent the last week with my family and had many special visits with my own Grandmother who is 89.

 

As I read you mention your 14 yr old foster son, I couldn't help but think what this experience must have meant to him. You're right, we do take for granted our good childhoods. :hug3:

 

Share this comment


Link to comment
Guest
You are commenting as a guest. If you have an account, please sign in.
Add a comment...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
×

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.