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Darlene

Split Pea Soup with Ham - Pressure Canned

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Ok ladies, I'm going to be making up a HUGE pot of Split Pea soup with Ham...its going to take me all day to let this simmer so I might not get it can it till tomorrow but the entire process will be documented here.

 

Darlene's Split Pea Soup with Ham

 

1 - 5 to 6lb ham (bone in)

1 3/4lbs chopped onion

3 - 14oz packages of green split peas

1T peppercorns

3T Kosher salt

 

For later when canning:

 

Raw sliced carrots

Raw cubed potatoes

 

So, with that said...

 

I take about a 5-6lb ham with bone in and put it into my 20qt stock pot and fill with water.

 

(see attached)

108988-SplitPeaSoup014.jpg

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How weird, I am making the same thing. Got up and had it on by 8. Great minds think alike. Yesterday I made and canned black bean salsa soup with corn from the garden.

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I add the 3 bags of split peas, the onion (today I used dehydrated onions from my long term storage preps), peppercorns and salt, and let simmer on low for a few hours.

 

(see attached)

109006-SplitPeaSoup.jpg

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The soup is done, I'm tired, so I'm going to let this cool down and put it in the refrigerator for the night and debone and defat the ham tomorrow...

 

(see attached)

109063-soupisdone.jpg

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I'm almost sorry I have all my canning stuff put away for the year but not enough to dig it out again. I'm going to try this next year. I love ham and split pea soup.

 

I'm anxious to see your finished jars!

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Waddaya mean your canning stuff is put away for the year?

 

SWATSWATSWAT

 

There is NO reason you can't can year round Miss Dee!

 

SWATSWATSWAT

 

 

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I only have about 7 empty jars at this point and until I get some emptied I'm not doing anymore canning. Maybe after the holidays I'll give it a try.......and then again

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I have 30 cases of empty jars, canning is year round! why next month it will be buy one turkey and get one free!

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Westie, 30 cases of empty jars? That surprises me!!! When I get down to 4 empty cases I immediately get busy and start canning something. Wow, I can't imagine 30....you better get busy girl!

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Well Dee,

 

I asked for canning equipment on free cycle and got 30 brand new cases of jars!

 

I have twice that many in my canning shed. I am glad to have them too now that jars are almost a $1.00 a jar!

 

I was at a thrift store and picked up 18 half-gallon mason jars! at $0.50 each that was a find! I use them when I milk.

 

With this many jars I have no worries about running out. When I need to can, I just go shopping in my own store.

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I cube up the ham to, and for each quart jar, I put:

 

rounded 1/2c cubed ham

rounded 1/2c sliced carrots

rounded 1/2c cubed potatoes

 

(see attached)

109263-SplitPeaSoup021.jpg

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Where's the soup?

 

How did yours turn out?

 

The books all say to parboil potatoes for 10 min. before canning-never raw pack. Were they ok?

 

I did quarts at 10# for 90 min. Was the only thing I could figure-couldn't find actual canning directions for the soup, so I went with the ham directions.

 

Let's just say, mine was pretty much disastrous. So, what's the scoop on yours?

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Hmmmmm...I'm not sure what happened to yours...Mine came out beautiful. I've canned tons of jars of this and as long as the soup in the pot tastes right, what is canned in the jars comes out tasting right.

 

Maybe if you list the things that went wrong, I might have a better idea.

 

Sorry Necie ((((necie))))

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The main things that were *wrong*, was: #1-the beans ended up total mush, like paste. and #2-out of 5 qts I only have one that's still sealed. *BIG MAD* grrrr-my biggest pet peeve with canning!

 

My *guesses* as to what could've went wrong.

 

First time I've only done a patial patch in the canner-maybe I needed to add more than the 2 qts of water to start. Canner did go dry, which is a mess in itself with all that burnt stuff in the bottom. Not sure if it's cuz it was mushy or the water he added cuz it was so thick. (Our water isn't the best tasting, but it's the same water I cooked the soup with to begin with and it was fine.)

 

So maybe it was keeping the pressure right or it going dry. Should I add more water when I'm doing less than a full batch?

 

I've canned beef/vege soup w-barley for years and plain meats and such that all take 90 min and never had this problem. This is the first time I've tried to can dry beans with anything, though.

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You should start with 2-3 inches of water in the bottom of a canner. My old canner book says 2 quarts, but now the recommendation is 2-3 inches of water. It should not go dry with that amount, if so, then you probably have a leak in the seal.

When you can soups, you fill the jars half full of the solids, the other half of the jar with the liquid part. That should keep it from being too thick.

 

Here is a link to National Center for Home food preservation on canning soups. I know you need to have dried beans fully rehydrated before you add them to soup, but I try to not overcook them. :

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/can_04/soups.html

Barley is considered a thickener and should not be added to soups or other canned vegetable/meat products.

http://www.uwex.edu/ces/cty/pepin/flp/docu...ablesSafely.pdf

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Ok-the first link says to process for 75 min for qts. That's what I was thinking we always did, so why couldn't I find that # anywhere?! DUH! The last 15 min of canning was the worst-that's when the canner went dry and started spewing the burnt stuff out the jiggler and really smelled bad. ewwwwwww.

 

I was wondering if the beans were 'overcooked', since I made the soup to eat and canned the left-over. Well, then I don't know, cuz I don't tend to just can bean soup. Humph. Think I'll stick to canning the ham and broth and just adding the beans to eat.

 

I'll still do my beef/vege the same, though. And canned up perfectly.

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I'm confused...you said you canned dry beans. Do you mean you put the beans in dry with liquid?

 

Your canner running out of water is a huge problem and definitely effected the processing.

 

All I know to tell you is how I wrote about in canning my soup. While I put the beans in dry, they end up *melting* into the liquid, and when I can then, they the liquid does seperate from the weight of the melted beans. All I do is shake the jar up before opening it and then it's good to go.

 

I'll try to post some pictures that I took but forgot to put on here, so you can see how mine look.

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Oops. Sorry. I guess the way I said that does sound like that. No, I canned cooked, dry beans. I'd made the soup for a little party we had. We ate most of it-had my WBC full-but I decided to can the left-overs. 5 qts.

 

That's why I'm thinking that they were just REALLY overcooked. One of the sites that Violet posted said that you can soak your beans to rehydrate and then put them into the jars to can. I think that would be better, but it's just not necessarily something that I would do. I'd be more likely to can the ham/broth (which I already do) and then just make soup outa that with dry beans.

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Ummmm.....I know that I am a little behind here on this post....but decided to print it off today....and realized...it doesn't say about pressure and canning time....or did I miss something....any info would be appreciated. It sounds so good I would hate to mess a batch of it up by guessing. Thanks!

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Ooooops...sorry about that.

 

75 minutes for pints and 90 minutes for quarts, and the appropriate pressure for your elevation. I'm at 11' above sea level so I do 10lbs pressure. Generally it's 0-1000ft at 10lbs pressure, and over 1000ft at 15lbs pressure.

 

Good luck!

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