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ArmyOfFive4God

Traditional foods lifestyle

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Traditional foods lifestyle

 

Disclaimer- I don't expect everyone or anyone to agree on the following. These are solely MY research, MY experiences & MY thoughts. I will not debate anyone about this, as it is MY choice & there has been some interest shown on the traditional foods lifestyle.

 

Traditional foods lifestyle is basically a "back-to-basics" lifestyle. It goes beyond foods, however & here is what I've learned & my take on it.

 

Back to basics means removing what is known as conventional foods. These conventional items include, but are not limited to:

 

Non-organic foods

Processed & pre-pkg'ed foods

Refined foods

Foods with added dyes & unnatural preservatives

 

Traditional food items include, but again, are not limited to:

 

Sugars/sweeteners in raw/little refined forms (Rapadura, demerara, molasses, stevia, honey, agave, etc.)

Organic produce

Organic, free range, grass fed & finished beef

Organic fed, free range chickens & eggs

Food items made from scratch with natural/organic ingredients

 

After doing a lot of research on the effects of process foods & behaviour, I learned that some of the issues I was having with one of my kids, may be linked to pesticides, food colourings & other unnatural additives in foods. We've since cut out, or are working on cutting out (yeah, trying to use up those stores in moderation- waste not, want not) white sugar, white flour, non-organic produce, etc. It has been AMAZING the difference we've seen in all the kids, but esp. the one. I was leaning towards ODD (oppositional defiance disorder), and have been blessed to find information on TF before I went forward with any Dx's or treatments.

 

I have an example. A little background first- Jan 09 was when I started TF. As I mentioned we are not 100% TF yet. However, we have already been seeing VAST improvements in all kids, esp. the one. A couple weeks ago we were in the grocery store & my youngest was being his cute self & chatting with the lady in front of us at the register. She had grabbed a couple candies from the impulse rack & he started pointing out other stuff. "Did you see this? Did you see that? Do you like this type?" She looked at me, and she says "You know, I feel the need to buy 3 boys a candy bar." I said "Oh no, that's ok, you don't have to." The whole while I'm SCREAMING in my head "NOOOOO DON'T DO IT!!!!!!!!" She says "No, really, I don't mind." So I allowed her, against my better judgment, to buy them each a candy bar. I knew I shouldn't have, I KNEW better, but sometimes I CAN be a pushover, esp. to polite older people (she was not old by ANY means, don't get me wrong!). Within an hour, I noticed a HUGE change in the kids, and not for the better. Within 2 hours, 2 of them were grounded.

 

Now, since January, even though we've noticed changes, I've always questioned my choice. 2 weeks ago was the first time I felt totally vindicated in what I was doing. 2 weeks ago was the first time that I KNEW beyond a shadow of a doubt that I was doing the right thing. 2 weeks ago marked the day that I will not say yes again to offers of preservative, poison, dye laced nastiness. The only thing that had kept me going since Jan. was that nothing worth doing is easy & the little hope that the behavioural issues were changing. I had wondered for 4 months if the changes I was seeing were "in my head." 2 weeks ago, I knew that wasn't the case.

 

OK, so I know a LOT of you on here cook from scratch already. But TF goes beyond that in finding the best quality foods for you & your family. Of course you can cook from scratch & still be eating the junk- refined sugars, dyes, preservatives, GM foods, etc. TF is NOT easy. Some say it's not cheap, but like any other sales, you have to learn the cycles of sales & learn to budget. Follow a list, keep a price list, etc.

 

It's best to start small. Wean the family. That's what I've been doing. You don't want to switch everything over in 1 day. Your family will freak. They will rebel. They will EAT JUNK!!!

 

Go grocery shopping with your list & choose, say, 2-3 things of 20 or more that you desire to change.

 

For instance- you've got flour, jelly, apples, ice cream, lemons, peanut butter & milk on your list, among other stuff. Get your PB & lemons in organic, your ice cream "all natural." Leave everything else the same this trip. Each trip add 1 more thing you're willing to change over. Prices got you cornered? Find a co-op or a bulk supplier in your area. You'll pay around the same if not less for organics as you do for conventional in the grocery store.

 

I'll be back with more. But here's a start to get you reading & researching!

 

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Great info! Thanks!

 

From what I'm reading, we've been working towards that same end in many areas.

 

We also have behaviour issues with 2 of my 7, so certainly caught my attention.

 

Okay, so trying to think this through. It's the 'processing' that is the key? I know my mom says the more we do to food the worse it is for us? Is that about the same idea?

 

What about Sucanat? I've been reading at Breadbeckers and here's what they say at their site...

 

Sucanat is a sweetener made from freshly squeezed sugar cane juice. The juice is then dehydrated and powdered. Nothing is added and only the water is removed. Sucanat is, of course, sugar but contains many important minerals and vitamins absent completely from refined white sugar. Sucanat makes an excellent brown sugar substitute, especially for streusel type toppings, for which honey doesn't work at all. It is excellent on oatmeal, adding a rich flavor, and also works really well in cookie recipes. I still prefer, however, to use honey if it will work in the recipe. Sucanat has a mild molasses flavor and is not so sweet as white sugar.

 

http://www.breadbeckers.com/honey.htm

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Sucanat is fine, organic sucanat is better. Yes, the more we process food, the less nutritionally valuable it is. The more we process it, the more toxic it can be.

 

If you';d like to send me your number, or I can send mine, LMK! I love talking things I have a vested interest in! I'm on verizon, so if you also have ver. we're free to each other.

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Americans are accustomed to food being an artificially small proportion of their expenditures.

Keeping food prices artificially low requires:

processing to remove the natural oils of grains, so the grains can be stored and shipped more efficiently;

painting beef with a substnce that keeps it an attractive red color on the outside even when it is grey and putrescent inside;

adding substances to powdery and granulated stuffs, so that they do not clump or harden;

adding soybean flour to bread made with the equivalent of cardboard, to keep its gross nutrient profile closer to that of real whole-grain bread;

adding substances to retard the natural decomposition of any organism that is no longer growing;

feeding children "hamburgers" made with blood serum of cattle rather than ground muscle meat--literally, a scab on a bun;

adding excessive salt, sweetener, or monosodium glutamate to hide the fact that the food doesn't taste like real food;

and so on.

 

When you start eating real food, your grocery costs will vastly expand. A local better-food market is named Whole Foods and nicknamed Whole Paycheck. But really, food is what you get a paycheck to buy. Your daily bread. Your salerius (salt money). Your bringing-home-the-bacon. Feeding a family on whole foods that someone else has prepared would beggar someone making $60k a year. The only reasonable way to feed a family whole foods is to do the combining and preparation yourself, at home, with materials as fresh and as wholesome as you can get them, and bartering for what you can't make. Milling and kneading and baking two loaves of bread is not that much more difficult than making one, and leaves a loaf you can swap for jelly or butter that someone you know has made, of ingredients you wouldn't be afraid to use, while saving her the trouble of making bread that day.

 

Okay, someone else can have the soap box now.

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I switched to cooking and eating a traditional diet about 5 years ago. I never want to go back. My food is so fresh and alive.

 

In his book called, What the Bible Says About Healthy Living, Dr. Rex Russell outlines three principles for eating.

 

#1 Eat only substances God created for food. Avoid what is not designed for food.

( think of all of the additives in our foods. Sweeteners made from wood alchohol, or from chemicals that were discovered while developing new pesticides to kill bugs.)

 

#2 As much as possible, eat foods as they were created- before they are changed or converted into something humans think might be better.( Think about pringles potato chips. The manufacturer buys a glut of potatoes in the peak season and dehydrates them. Later in the season, when potatoes are higher priced, they can re-hydrate them into a slurry, sprinkle in flavor enhancers and fry it in rancid oil.)

 

#3 Avoid food addictions. Don't let any food or drink become your god.( I don't think we need an example for this.)

 

 

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My family has started making the switch to a TF eating style (Hi Army of Five!). Due to our current living arrangements (we have been living in a camp trailer for the past 7 months. We 'think' that we will have our house in the next week) our progress has been pretty slow and not as consistent as I would like. My thought is any progress is better than none.

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AOF4G, Thanks so much for starting this! I know there was another thread going a long while ago. Also see the one I started about saturated fats, which keys into this same topic.

 

I started to slowly change over to a TF lifestyle a year or two ago, but didn't make too serious of a go of it. Last fall I bought and read Nourishing Traditions by Sally Fallon, and I haven't turned back. It was still a slow go, until I bought Eat Fat, Lose Fat by Mary Enig and Sally Fallon and Real Food by Nina Planck. (of course, the post in this thread by Amberris will assure I never go back! Gross!). At first, my DH went along with me, just because he loves me, but then he started noticing the changes in taste, as well as his health. Now, when he goes to the store, he makes sure that he buys foods that he knows I will approve of. He keeps getting more disgusted with food labels every day. And, he said that when we can afford a good grain mill, we will get it as soon as possible. I already soak my beans for no less than 24-48 hours. And bone broth (only chicken so far) is a staple in the kitchen.

 

I saw this article today about the benefits of REAL lard, not the stuff that is in most stores (armour?) that is mixed with hydrogenated oils. http://slate.com/id/2219314/?GT1=38001. It sums up what we already know, but is a good article to hand off to friends and family that don't quite "get it". Like the fact that lard is actually considered an unsaturated fat, NOT a saturated fat. I didn't know that before I read Real Food.

 

My kids are also proof that TF is good for you, AOF4G. Especially my youngest DS that has been previously hospitalized with asthma 4 separate times. He is the reason I got really serious about going TF. His last hospitalization was in March, but since then, he hasn't had hardly any asthma symptoms. Even with all the flus and colds going around, he has not gotten any of them and no breathing problems. Praise God!

 

My next goals are to learn how to lacto-ferment veggies, and to find someone that I can get kefir grains from. I'm looking for both milk and water kefir grains. Also, homemade bread left to rise for at least 18+ hours. Here's the recipe I'm planning on trying on Monday. http://www.nytimes.com/2006/11/08/dining/081mrex.html?_r=2. As noted above, I do not have a grain mill yet, so I will have to buy the whole wheat flour from our coop for now.

 

Anyway, I'm excited about this thread and I hope to learn from others that are more knowledgable and maybe I can help answer questions, too. :)

 

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Oh, and we LOVE sucanat! I quit buying regular white sugar close to a year ago and only buy sucanat. We use it mostly in our coffee and sometimes oatmeal. And it tastes wonderful on grapefruit! I'm not sure if you can replace white sugar with sucanat (or rapadura) in recipes. Would love to find out, if anyone has tried it!

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I use Rapadura in my cooking.

The flavor is similar to brown sugar, so it does affect the taste of your food, mostly the more delicate flavored things like sugar cookies or white cake.

I'm doing low carb now, so I really don't make goodies anymore. I haven't tried it in a wide variety of things.

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Eat Fat, Lose Fat was a good book, too. That's what made me decide to quit being afraid of fats. And YKW? SHE'S RIGHT!!! I lost 12 pounds the first couple months of TF. We switched from skim, 1% & 2% milks to raw, started eating more dark chicken meat, etc. TWELVE POUNDS! And I feel great!!!

 

I'm so happy to hear your baby's symptoms have improved!!! Not only do I do this for MY family, I do it as a small voice for others. If I can demand organics, less toxins, etc, there's someone out there that couldn't normally afford the good stuff, and I am making a demand for better quality foods.

 

If I can get my water kefir grains (WKG) to multiply, I'll LYK & send some on. I just restarted a batch today. I also have yoghurt going & some Amish Friend hsip Bread starter going. I have jars of HM kraut in the fridge, etc. There's a lady on ebay who is super, that I got my WKG from, and my next order from her will be a kombucha & dairy kefir offer she has.

 

Homemaker, I use demerara, and it's similar to rapadura. I' weaning the family, so we started with turbinado (refined, but a little less than white), now we're on demerara & I've started the switch to palm sugar. We also use honey, agave, stevia & maple syrup.

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You ladies are awesome - I admire and respect your choices. Thanks for posting your successes - somehow it makes it easier to keep on trying. I haven't found a way to make all the changes I would like to (finding organic milk for example, or a source for organic chicken). We've made small changes in our food habits but there's still a long way to go but it's getting to the point where I silently gag everytime we buy something less than desirable.

 

I tell myself it's like learning to play piano - you start with "chop sticks" and Twinkle Twinkle - you don't play Beethoven's 20th piano concerto on the first day. I've started by making all my bread - from home-milled grain (my husband is addicted to Red Fife wheat but I think that it's a good addiction). Finding sources for all the things I'd like to use is difficult. This summer I'm hoping to find farm markets to stock up on organic, local vegetables and fruits.

 

The whole idea of trading labour for the fruits of someone else's labour (trading bread for jelly) & "Your daily bread. Your salerius (salt money)" Ambergis - what a wonderful explanation - it was something I had a dim grasp of but didn't have the right words.

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Army of Five, I would love some water kefir grains, it yours mulitply! If not, can you give me the name of the lady on ebay? I've been asking the local Yahoo group here for some, but no one has responded so far.

 

I forgot about raw milk. There are several farms around here that I can buy a share of a cow and get some raw milk from them. It's $50 for the share and between $30-$40/month for "boarding" fees. With that, I can get one gallon a week. We already get grass-fed organic, non-homogenized milk delivered by a local dairy, which is about as good as you can get without it being raw. TMI Warning** DH has been having some major stomach problems lately, and unfortunately visits the toilet too often. We've pretty much linked it to any kind of cheese. So, I was thinking that if I can get some raw cheese, it might help him out. The only way to do that is to own a share of a cow.

 

This morning I remembered the book that actually got me started in my TF thinking, but I didn't realize it was TF at the time. About 4 years ago, or so, I bought the Maker's Diet. I thought, how could the Maker be wrong? It is very strict about the kinds of fish you can and can't eat, not eating pork, eating kosher (TF style), etc. DH and I went on it for about 2 months and couldn't keep doing it. It was really strict and too hard for us, at the time. It's still a good book to read, but I think that some of these others have better/easier explanations.

 

Homemaker, what else can you use for sugar cookies and things that "require" white sugar? I guess, other than not making them.

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Article on slate.com: Lard !!!!!!!! To me TF foods mean you eat animal products, at least most who follow it do, right?

It seems to me, that lard is healthier than margarines and such things, veggie oil..... read the article posted below. Plus, when I was young before fast food really got its secure hold it has now, I did not see all that many overweight people. I did not see folks, such as the high population mix that had Mexicans and Mexican Americans, as overweight, I grew up in Southern California. Their recipe ingredients are quite balanced for the typical daily foods and that included fat intake, for the most part. Lard is healthier than veggie fats in general that can be produced in our own country!

 

It seems to me that when it was easier to buy ready made foods, that also became easier to get as technology offered different jobs and folks sent their kids off to college instead of having them work on the farm...and cities made food shopping easy... and food became more diverse and we became spoiled with all kinds of fancy foods we can graze and easily get. without the true physical effort, and food began to really change, and the way people graze..... well..... this seems a basic thing to consider. Especially now that our foods are so 'designed' by science now..... and that things are being put into foods that just shouldnt be there.

 

When we begin to take charge and want to make good, wholesome foods for ourselves and our families, this changes, back to something alot more normal. One thing is you spend alot more time preparing foods, and you spend alot of money and time and strength and getting things to create your homestead and getting good livestock..... you become far more concious of how much it takes! ( Which is far more natural than it has been in our society overall for some time. ) This article on lard gave me information on how it works, and it makes the most sense to me. I don't have to be afraid of it. Its not a fad, its real stuff.

 

 

Article below.

Lard

After decades of trying, its moment is finally here.

By Regina Schrambling

Posted Tuesday, June 2, 2009, at 11:39 AM ET

Read more from Slate's Food issue.

 

....

SINGLE PAGEYahoo! Buzz FacebookMySpace Mixx Digg Reddit del.icio.us Furl Ma.gnolia SphereStumbleUponCLOSEWait long enough and everything bad for you is good again. Sugar? Naturally better than high-fructose corn syrup. Chocolate? A bar a day keeps the doctor away. Caffeine? Bring it on.

 

Lard, however, has always been a ridiculously hard sell. Over at least the last 15 years, it's repeatedly been given a clean bill of health, and good cooks regularly point out how superior this totally natural fat is for frying and pastries. But that hasn't been enough to keep Americans from recoiling—lard's negative connotations of flowing flesh and vats of grease and epithets like lardass and tub of lard have been absurd hurdles. But no longer. I'm convinced that the redemption of lard is finally at hand because we live in a world where trendiness is next to godliness. And lard hits all the right notes, especially if you euphemize it as rendered pork fat—bacon butter.

 

 

Homemade lardLard has clearly won the health debate. Shortening, the synthetic substitute foisted on this country over the last century, has proven to be a much bigger health hazard because it contains trans fats, the bugaboo du jour. Corporate food scientists figured out long ago that you can fool most of the people most of the time, and shortening (and its butter-aping cousin, margarine) had a pretty good ride after Crisco was introduced in 1911 as a substitute for the poor man's fat. But shortening really vanquished lard in the 1950s when researchers first connected animal fat in the diet to coronary heart disease. By the '90s, Americans had been indoctrinated to mainline olive oil, but shortening was still the go-to solid fat over lard or even butter in far too many cookbooks.

 

 

I have to admit even I was suckered by the nutrition nuttiness, despite having been all but weaned on lard in a Mexican neighborhood in Arizona. The great Mexican cooks in kitchens on either side of our house used it to make wondrously supple flour tortillas and almost airy tamales, while my Oklahoma-born dad worked it into biscuits and melted it for frying anything in his cast-iron skillet before we could afford, as he always put it, to "eat like white folks." (Peasant food has cachet only if you are not forced to live on it.) As a food writer, I learned early on that it was considered a four-letter word in recipes, even when it was essential for authenticity. (You can substitute butter in Mexican aniseed cookies called bizcochos, but they won't be as crisp, crunchy, and delicate.)

 

That's all changed. Now you could even argue that lard is good for you. As Jennifer McLagan points out in her celebrated book Fat: An Appreciation of a Misunderstood Ingredient, With Recipes, lard's fat is also mostly monounsaturated, which is healthier than saturated fat. And even the saturated fat in lard has a neutral effect on blood cholesterol. Not to mention that lard has a higher smoking point than other fats, allowing foods like chicken to absorb less grease when fried in it. And, of course, fat in general has its upsides. The body converts it to fuel, and it helps absorb nutrients, particularly calcium and vitamins.

 

What matters more, though, is that lard has become the right ingredient at the right time. It fits perfectly into the Michael Pollan crusade to promote foods that have been processed as minimally as possible: Your great-grandmother surely cooked with it, so you should, too.

 

Add to that the new awareness that what you eat matters environmentally—if you are going to eat an animal on a planet at risk from too many humans raising too many animals to eat, you have to eat the whole thing. Lard is just about the last stop before the squeal when pork producers are extracting every savory bit from a pig.

 

That environmental consciousness coupled with competitive cooking has resulted in the nose-to-tail trend set off by British chef Fergus Henderson. Walk into any high-end restaurant these days and pork chops are less prevalent than pig's ears, trotters, and jowls. The salumi/charcuterie craze has also been great for enhancing lard's profile, particularly thanks to lardo—pork belly cured Tuscan-style with wine and herbs and served in thin slices over warm bread or on pizza. If Mario Batali says it's good, diners everywhere listen.

 

The best lard is leaf lard, from the fat around the kidneys of a hog, preferably a heritage hog. Flying Pigs Farm sells this at the Greenmarket in Union Square in New York City for $6 per 8-ounce container, and it sells out fast. Lard from the supermarket can still be pretty scary; most of it has been hydrogenated to make it last longer.

 

(As I learned from lard crusader Zarela Martinez in New York, you can make your own if you can get your hands on top-quality fat from a small producer—back, belly, or kidney fat will all work. Cut it into chunks and cook them very slowly over low heat until the fat seeps out and only crispy bits are left. Strain it and save the fat in the refrigerator almost indefinitely. Salt the cracklings and eat them as what Mexicans call chicharrones.)

 

Only one thing may put lard back on the slippery slope: Google the word as news, and it might as well be lard-fearing 1969 all over again. Newspaper food pages still routinely advise using olive or canola oils rather than "fattening" or "artery-clogging" lard. Or they print idiotic utterances like "you get all the lard you need at McDonald's" (a chain that actually abandoned beef tallow for frying its fries only to be saddled with a trans-fatty substitute). Occasionally an article will make a valid point—lard is still anathema to vegetarians and halal observers—but more often there will be surprise that lard does not taste anything like pig.

 

Which is one more reason it is taking off at last. It's stealth fat.

 

 

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It seems to me that when it was easier to buy ready made foods, that also became easier to get as technology offered different jobs and folks sent their kids off to college instead of having them work on the farm...and cities made food shopping easy... and food became more diverse and we became spoiled with all kinds of fancy foods we can graze and easily get. without the true physical effort, and food began to really change, and the way people graze..... well..... this seems a basic thing to consider. Especially now that our foods are so 'designed' by science now..... and that things are being put into foods that just shouldnt be there.

 

When we begin to take charge and want to make good, wholesome foods for ourselves and our families, this changes, back to something alot more normal. One thing is you spend alot more time preparing foods, and you spend alot of money and time and strength and getting things to create your homestead and getting good livestock..... you become far more conscious of how much it takes! ( Which is far more natural than it has been in our society overall for some time. ) This article on lard gave me information on how it works, and it makes the most sense to me. I don't have to be afraid of it. Its not a fad, its real stuff.

 

Exactly Arby! As people went for convenience over substance, the world changed and not for the better. We are made out to be "weird" because we only want the best for our families. So that means taking time to make real meals, with real food. I am in the process of switching the family over to more of the traditional food lifestyle. And yes it is a lifestyle, not just food. I am getting the chemicals out of the house and going back to the "old time" cleaners (and the actually work better in my opinion). We have a garden for the second year. It great to watch the children try new things because they have helped and watched it grow.

 

I tend to think most of us on here are moving toward this direction.

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I have just started working towards a TF lifestyle, but there are still things I have to do without for now. I am making my own breads with whole wheat flour, but don't yet have a grain grinder, and buying wheat berries are a little out of my pocketbook level. I use no artificial anything. I do use sugar or honey. I can't afford sucanant yet, but my honey I use is raw. Anyway, it is little things right? It does make for more work in the kitchen, but since I enjoy that, it is no biggie. I am growing my own organic foods this year, but organic meat is not available to me. I am having to pick and choose my battles. I am hoping over the years I will be able to move more and more to a fully TF lifestyle. I find this article facinating and am lucky to be able to pick you guys brains for info on how to switch over everything.

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Beck, it is every.little.thing.you.do. ONE of the HUGE reasons to switch gradually, otherwise, like with anything else, you get overwhelmed & burned out & quit. Keep it up, a little at a time!

 

I'm THRILLED with the responses here! I had no idea how many of you were into TF, aka whole foods!!! This is spectacular!!

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I have just started working towards a TF lifestyle, but there are still things I have to do without for now. I am making my own breads with whole wheat flour, but don't yet have a grain grinder, and buying wheat berries are a little out of my pocketbook level. I use no artificial anything. I do use sugar or honey. I can't afford sucanant yet, but my honey I use is raw. Anyway, it is little things right? It does make for more work in the kitchen, but since I enjoy that, it is no biggie. I am growing my own organic foods this year, but organic meat is not available to me. I am having to pick and choose my battles. I am hoping over the years I will be able to move more and more to a fully TF lifestyle. I find this article facinating and am lucky to be able to pick you guys brains for info on how to switch over everything.

 

One website that has already been mentioned is www.cookingtf.com. This website has a service that can help you plan out meals that are tf, which can help take some of the guesswork out of it. I haven't used the subscription service yet, but I know of several people that it has helped. Some swear by it. The discussion board on there is very helpful.

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I have to agree, but I'm probably a bit biased, LOL. The recipes are easy & made with wholefoods. The mailer is comprised of 6 recipes, complete with a shopping list & prep instructions (for example, if you need to prep foods the night before, make a double helping of something, etc.). The ladies that frequent the brd are extremely nice & helpful, and unlike a lot of brds, they don't look down their noses at you!

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G&V,

I don't know of any healthier way to make sugar cookies and other delicate flavored baked goods so that they taste the same as with white sugar.

I just don't make them, except at christmas when I blow everything and suffer in regret till I get back to eating right.

If I make a favorite family treat for a special occasion, I go all out and follow the original recipe. I just try to make less of it and let the kids beat me to it so there's not much left for me. That's hard with my grandmother's sugar cookies. they're my Christmas comfort food.

 

As far as the lard goes, I would use it if I could get a pure and organic product. Wal-mart has lard, but it has preservatives in it. I've seen a place where you can order it online, but I can't afford it.

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