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Bread-making, the TF way

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I am actually making bread! :cheer: I know, most of you are already doing this, but I've made my first loaf that was actually edible!! I used the recipe from Mother Earth News called Artisan bread in 5 minutes a day. It calls for yeast to salt ratio of 1 1/2 tbsp each. The initial rise is 2 hours, then you put it in your fridge for at least 3 hours and it keeps up to 2 weeks. You just take dough as needed. Sounds perfect, right? But now I want to make a 2nd batch, but more TF.

 

Making the bread TF requires a longer rise of at least 12-24 hours. This is supposed to reduce the phytates and make the nutrients more available. The recipe calls for 3 1/2 c. water and 6 1/2 c. flour, along with the yeast and salt. If I wanted to make it with this same amount of water and flour, but have the initial rise be at least 18 hours, I've heard I should reduce the yeast down to only 1/4 tsp., but keep the salt the same. So, my question is, what if I want to double the recipe? How does one learn the proper salt to yeast ratio? It seems to depend on so much!

 

Also, I don't know that this recipe would make that great of a sandwich bread. How much milk and honey or sucanat would I need to add, and how else would I need to change up the recipe? :shrug:

 

One day I'll be wise and experienced, but for now, I feel like I'm getting a late start in these kinds of things. But, better late than never, eh? :frying pan:

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Stands for Traditional Foods, MomM. There are various way's of looking at that but generally it is used as a term for whole, healthy, fresh or freshly made foods.

:bighug2:

Edited by Mother

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I am actually making bread! :cheer: I know, most of you are already doing this, but I've made my first loaf that was actually edible!! I used the recipe from Mother Earth News called Artisan bread in 5 minutes a day. It calls for yeast to salt ratio of 1 1/2 tbsp each. The initial rise is 2 hours, then you put it in your fridge for at least 3 hours and it keeps up to 2 weeks. You just take dough as needed. Sounds perfect, right? But now I want to make a 2nd batch, but more TF.

 

Making the bread TF requires a longer rise of at least 12-24 hours. This is supposed to reduce the phytates and make the nutrients more available. The recipe calls for 3 1/2 c. water and 6 1/2 c. flour, along with the yeast and salt. If I wanted to make it with this same amount of water and flour, but have the initial rise be at least 18 hours, I've heard I should reduce the yeast down to only 1/4 tsp., but keep the salt the same. So, my question is, what if I want to double the recipe? How does one learn the proper salt to yeast ratio? It seems to depend on so much!

 

Also, I don't know that this recipe would make that great of a sandwich bread. How much milk and honey or sucanat would I need to add, and how else would I need to change up the recipe? :shrug:

 

One day I'll be wise and experienced, but for now, I feel like I'm getting a late start in these kinds of things. But, better late than never, eh? :frying pan:

 

 

I don't know the ratios but I do have a good, soft, easy sandwich bread recipe that uses the rapid rise method if you want it.

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G&V ... did you ever get this issue resolved? If so, how did it work out. I've just come across these threads and noticed there hasn't been any activity in a long time. Have these conversations moved elsewhere, or does anyone know?

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http://www.victoriapacking.com/yeastinfo.html

 

Salt is used in bread making because it conditions gluten, making it stronger and more elastic. Salt also affects yeast fermentation. Because salt inhibits the growth of yeast, it helps control the dough's rise. Too little salt and not only will the bread taste bland, it will rise too rapidly. Too much salt, however, and the yeast will be destroyed.

 

Baker percentage:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baker_percentage

 

Bread Yeast FAQs:

http://germanfood.about.com/od/preparedfoods/a/yeast-Saccharomyces-cerevisiae_2.htm

Small amounts of salt can actually help yeast function better (0.5 - 1%), whereas 1.5-2.5% salt (by weight to flour) acts inhibitory. Salt is necessary for bread gluten structure, however, as well as for taste. Many breads are made satisfactorily with 2% salt.

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