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Mt_Rider

WITHOUT WARNING - Packing for migratory living in GD2

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A lot of folks have been avid readers of our Wagons Ho thread up in Pioneer Living forum. Those of us who "packed" our conestoga wagons, learned to drive teams of oxen, and traveled to Big Valley have been astonished at how MUCH we learned ....EVEN THO IT IS UNreality. Even tho it is merely the written word. We aren't even acting this out. [well, some of us do get out our flint and steel and try to start fires, etc IRL ] But this has caused me [others report the same] a depth of focus that I haven't had before. We have LIVED this UNreality for THREE months now. It took a while but suddenly, we noticed ourselves THINKING in "wagons ho" terms. How would we do this or that in our normal REAL lives if we had to do it primitive? :lol: A few of us have admitted to actually mixing the IRL and the UNreality up ....just for a second, mind you. :busted:

 

 

I would like to state again, that this UNreality exercise...like all of them that I create, was not just to have a very enjoyable fantasy of escaping the coming chaos and choosing instead to face the challenges and dangers of the wilderness. [almost wilderness ;) ]

 

 

The real reason for starting to pack the conestoga wagons was that I wanted to get a clear notion as to what I'd need to pack into my own vehicle ....if ever economic times hit and Mr.MtR and I would have to join the migratory hordes such as happened in the first Great Depression. Look up the pictures of that era. You see vehicles piles high with belongings. People travel from place to place to find work. They do not stay at the Holiday Inn. They lived in tents in large encampments....tent cities. Sound familiar?

 

 

Now that the wagoneers have arrived and are settling into our homestead living, I for one, am wishing I'd brought this or that. A different focus from what one needs for migratory living.

 

 

So at this point I'll present the REAL Without Warning UNreality Scenario. Readers of the W*Ho threads will hopefully be more up to speed with this. :shrug: A previous Without Warning Scenario featured the 2nd Great Depression too. But in that one you were moving all you could to a plot of land you own and setting up there. [similar to W*Ho] In this scenario, you will have no where to go - and it's not going to be a very comfortable Scenario. But some of us who have lost income already and are fighting to find employment can see the value of running this particular one...... :grouphug:

 

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NOTE: If you are new to this site and have never seen these "Without Warning" UNreality Scenarios....please take the time to go backward in Are You Really Ready forum and see how they work. :)

===========================================

 

 

WITHOUT WARNING: Packing for migratory living in the Second Great Depression [GD2]

 

Well, in truth you could see it coming. Perhaps it was just hearing the news of how unemployment was up..and up... Perhaps it was the rumors of layoffs at your work...or your spouse's. Perhaps your business was paying the bills but couldn't afford your family a paycheck....and then it wasn't paying all the bills either.... Or perhaps it was quite sudden. After all, you/spouse have a GOOD job with a STABLE outlook. Perhaps it was a sudden physical illness that took out your savings. Or you were cheated by someone you should have been able to trust?

 

Think upon these possibilities because YOU & YOUR FAMILY [if applicable] have talked all thru this night. But you have reached the inevitable conclusion. The global/national unemployment rate has skyrockets until even the government is admitting 28%. [Remember...we're in UNreality here...only a future possible event :rolleyes: ] There are shortages of basic goods. There is hyperinflation to some degree. There is violence. But there is also goodness shown each and every day.

 

You DO NOT want to do this but, you are being evicted from your home. There has been NO employment available in your area for a long time. The guy or gal flipping burgers has a college degree and is THANKFUL to earn under $8/hr. But he or she already has that job and your family hasn't found ANYthing. You are going to have to pack up your vehicle and leave....but you have no where to go. You will do as has been done before. You will live from your vehicle and tents(?) and travel the states, trying to find enough work to feed/clothe your family. Some migratory harvesting might be available over in CA? Or you heard a factory in Cleveland might be hiring? You will have to go and see. OR...you will have to live as best you can from your car and attend the many soup kitchens thankfully popping up all over the nation.

 

1) Decide what vehicle you'd be left with. Do you own outright a camper/travel trailer and something to pull it? Or can you make payments on a vehicle you have now? If not, figure how you will purchase something outright. You will also need money for gas....and pulling a trailer will require more gas.

 

2) Decide what things you have that could be sold...in an economic situation like I described. What will you need to purchase with that money? What other sources of money can you liquidate? Or might it have all disappeared by now? :(

 

3) However, you are mentally and physically - a survivor type. This will be so very hard but you are determined that you [and your family] will survive. So begin a list. What will you bring for food, water, shelter, clothing, health & sanitation, morale, education [children], protection, etc.

 

4) Describe how these things will reasonably FIT into the vehicle(s). Try to be creative with multi-use items. Watch for weight....Do you have good shock absorbers? While you may tie things to the rooftop...you may not have the children ride there :laughkick:

 

 

 

 

Not a nice scenario to EVEN consider, is it? But thousands and thousands survived just that type of scenario. Some of our parents or grandparents. And they raised up another generation who once again bought homes and raised up the next generation in better circumstances. There is always HOPE, LOVE, FAITH. Even if you would someday live as those thousands in the 1930's did. Lets hope and pray we don't have to......but.....are you really prepared for it?

 

 

 

MtRider [yeah...it's a LOT more fun to do this in Wagons Ho......]

 

 

Edit to add: I've been asked if this Scenario is a new "Wagons Ho - Big Valley" type story. NO! :lol: This is just a list and discussion. A NORMAL Without Warning Scenario. That other kind, tho valuable and a lot of fun....is soooooo much work/time commitment. But I think I've been neglecting this RURR forum while we are in the other UNreality. LOL

Edited by Mt_Rider
clarification

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OH GROAN!!!! This is going to be harder than the wagons..... :huh:

 

My first inclination was to say we'll just take the Motor Home but it does take more gas. The van has a bed and etc but doesn't hold nearly as much and it takes almost as much gas as it's a handicapped one. We have an older camper van with bathroom facilities but it too isn't cheap on gas nor as dependable...The old VW vanagon might be the answer.. Much smaller but still could sleep in it...Hmmmmm going to have to think this through better before I post.

 

By the way. I have a great niece in CA. who lives out of their full-sized van with her DH and grown but disabled DD. They have lived this way for about two years. The camp in campgrounds to take showers and etc occassionally, they live in parking lots, moving once in a while to stay out of trouble. They live from disability check to disability check and what work they can get. According to them there is a whole community of travelers like that already. It is also dangerous. They have had to flee for their lives several times already. They call themselves modern Gypsies.

 

Hmm I have a sort of 'gypsy' wagon in the Wagons Ho thread, I bet it would work better if I had it IRL. Feed for the horses on the road sides would be cheaper than gas.

 

Okay, I'm in. I'll give it some thought and then see what I can come up with. As usual Mt_R, you outdo yourself in UN scenes. :wub:

 

:bighug2:

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You did outdo yourself. I cannot imagine doing this. Don't even know if I can face the thought. Part of what makes it hard for me, is our house is paid for. This is a blessing for sure. This should be an interesting thread; some of you have such good imaginations.

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This is going to be a good one! Having just finnished reading "Patriots" by James Rawles, it has a simmilair primis for its stroy.

 

I'll ask my wife to play along with me on this one. She's not into doing thies things as I am, but now and then, she can have some blinding flashes of the obviouse that I missed.

 

Will post again soon.

 

Robie

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I honestly believe we have been planning for this scenario since Dec. '02 when we sold our house, bought our first used motor home and started traveling out West-being snowbirds and working as we went. It is now more of a nomadic lifestyle and I am not sure how to make it (unreality). We can be ready to go within a few hours with all we own.

Mt. Rider--Maybe I am looking at this wrong--I'm not sure.

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Snapshot...maybe you could give us an idea of how you do live. We all seem to be dragging our feet on this one. I believe I could do it in our motor home too but it would be great if you could give all of us some clues of what you really do need along and etc. I know I'm interested???

 

:bighug2:

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Go for it, Snapshot. I do know a growing population of full-time RVers are in this country. Enjoy the lifestyle and the freedom from upkeep on a property. If you can find a place to park ....even if an income was scarce.

 

But of course, you'd have to have a way to acquired the RV/camper if you didn't already have one when this Scenario occurred.

 

We've only got a truck and topper [over the bed]. And we'd have to head immediately south cuz !!!OH BOY!!! is it cold sleeping back there. Tried it in September...early Sept. Brrrrrrrrr. A tent MIGHT be warmer. But less secure?????

 

 

How 'bout hauling a small livestock trailer for poultry and dwarf goats? Couldn't camp in the local Walmart lot with that. :lol: I would so NOT want to do this and give up my animals. Especially the food-producing ones. But this is a desperation Scenario so........... :shrug:

 

 

Sure could not haul all my storage buckets. Would I stash some basic things in small storage locations here and there? Would I drive from friend to friend around the country to have a base to establish from?

 

 

As I mentioned....not an easy Scenario....especially for this RURAL gal!

 

 

MtRider [gotta have the wheelchair cuz without my horse, in time -- I would not be walking. :( ]

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The problem is the huge brick wall six inches from my nose. I used to have plans to go to X, but my family there died. I had another option, but it was always a temporary (during a hurricane) stop in the road to #1--and my touchstone there is now a grandmother with many dependents who would need her more than I/mine do. The old family place has largely been turned into a trailer park. A crowded trailer park. The other options have huge negatives. I've spent so many years turning this place into where people will go (can ya hear the It's not faiiir whine from there?) I wouldn't have a clue where to aim or how to get there. Much less how to get there first. And my whole household wouldn't fit into any one of the vehicles we could lay hands on, even if all the critters and supplies were abandoned. We'd literally be walking, pushing or pulling handcarts.

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I have located my folder with plans for bicycle carts. We'd make five: one per available bicycle. That would give us between 900 and 1250 lbs total cargo weight. As a rough measure, we'd want three carts for food and food prep (including water filters); one for clothing, medical, tools and spare parts, and books; one for tents, bedding, chicken cages, and defense (including the binoculars). We'd need skates, skateboards, or these skateboards with handles that kids use now for the adults who don't have bikes or can't tolerate riding one. The dog would pull a cart of her food, at the very least, or would become barbecue.

Edited by Ambergris

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Just got home and saw the questions and replies. I'm gonna sleep on it and get back here tomorrow before I go to work.

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About 5 years ago we lost everything. We were out of town when disaster struck and afterwards all we had was what we had with us. This happen the last week of July first week of August so you can imagine what we had with us. So with that said if I knew that I would have to pack as if I wasn’t coming back I would pack the following….With those bags that suck all the air out it would make packing easier…

 

Good winter coat and a light weight jacket

Gloves

Good winter shoes and thick socks

Pictures (we lost all of the pictures we had taken through the years)

Cook ware (the good stuff because it is expensive to replace)

My favorite knife

Cookbooks (I lost my collection-I had an entire set of Southern Living cookbooks)

At least 3 complete changes of clothes for each season plus 3 extra shirts per person

Work clothes and play clothes

Dress clothes (You never know when you will need them)

Bedding (grandmother’s quilts and those special blankets - don’t leave them behind and air mattresses for everyone don't forget the pillows)

Dishes (I lost my favorite set of dishes)

Kitchen utensils this includes a cutting board

All my canning supplies

Important papers – I had everything but passports with us

 

Little things you don’t think about…

Grater

Shifter

Potato peeler

Wooden spoons

Bowls

Storage containers

Toaster

Crock pots

Gumbo pan (I miss my gumbo pan)

 

If I had room for only one small electric appliance (that is after the coffee pot) I would take a mixer. I like the food processor but I also have a little plunger chopper that I use and I have the grater so the food processor would be just an added perk.

 

The things that I miss most are the quilts, blankets, pictures and the tablecloths that were hand cross stitched/ embroidered that we received as gifts.

 

 

I would have also packed my husband gun collection. The fishing poles, the bows and arrows (we had a bow) bikes

 

And of course all of the food I possibly could take.

 

I am sure there is more but that is all I could think of this morning.

 

We have 3 cars plus a car top carrier. My goal this year is to acquire a truck with a crew cab and get one of those over the cab camper shells. We have packed up and moved in a extended size Ford Econoline van before (the boys were little) and we had a car top carrier. We sold all the large furniture and then we packed the kitchen stuff in the car top carrier Each child had a tote of clothes and a smaller tote of toys. I packed clothes in small roll bags and stuffed them under the seats. Banana boxes are wonderful to pack in (they have handles) I used them for bedding, towels, clothes, and food.

 

As for preparing mentally, I am not sure if you can ever be prepared mentally. Things happen and you are in shock and lot of times you are just in self-preservation mode.

 

Since loosing everything I am no longer a pack rat. I haven't laid in a years worth of stuff yet (I am up to 3-4 months) so we could get our personal stuff, kitchen stuff and preps all in the 3 cars we have. We would not be able to take the large furniture and appliances but we would be able to survive on what we could get in the cars.

Edited by mommato3boys

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Our experiences have been all over the board since we started. First we sold too much. DH didn't think we would have room for anything but clothes- a few and very little food. All of my cast iron, most of my spices and canned food, glass and heavy bowls--all gone. Switched to lighter wight cooking ware and plastic bowls. One set of silverware and china. Left behind my moms depression glass and other antiques as we figured they would break (packed in totes). So we packed our new used 25 foot motorhome and van and left FL. We will never forget that first night away from all of our family and friends. We were in a State Park on the gulf. It was scary and exciting. Our premise was to put our money where our mouth was and trust that God would not leave us.

 

One of my first changes was self image. Was a photographer, what the heck am I now? As we traveled West, our first stop was Blanco, TX. I worked in a deli at a gas station for a bit but dh did not find work there so we had to move on. He found work in Saatler, TX so I started looking and found a job cleaning a bed and breakfast part time. Stayed there the first winter and then headed north with that scary, excited feeling always around. I cleaned rooms at a Holiday Inn in South Dakota. We realized that dh needed to find work first and then I could find something as I did not make as much. Started waitressing in Cheyenne and that is my niche. (Serving) Apparently I thought I was somebody when I was a photographer as it was quite humbling to waitress. Sometimes God works that way, huh? DH still does body work but also cleans the restaurant I work at. He has been humbled too. We both think that is good for us.

 

Last summer I felt that I needed to prep again--I wonder why-- but with no room what to do?

My next perpective shift is to have equip. to work with wherever we are. Meat and wheat grinder rather than storing the same. Saving seeds rather than having a garden now. Had to re buy all my canning epuip and started canning again on a smaller scale. With little storage room I have material for tp if needed rather than storing cases of tp. In other words I am collecting knowledge instead of stuff-mostly.

 

We switched to a truck and trailer so we had one less vehicle to insure and maintain. And the few small antiques we kept are still packed in totes in the truck. In the "event" we are considering, we just assume that God will put us where we are the most use to Him.

 

I think I am better at answering questions about what we do than writing as I tend to get sidetracked with the adventure and it won't be an adventure if one is forced to leave. That's it for now. If I think of more, I'll be back.

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I just remembered this: We switched from the motorhome which pulled our mini van to a truck and travel trailer (not a 5th wheel). 2 reasons. One less vehicle to maintain-sold mini van. Less insurance to pay-just one vehicle. And if one has a pull (travel) trailer and a truck, you can put a topper on the truck for more secure storage room. With a 5th wheel, one loses a good bit of the truck bed and no way to secure what is left--that I am aware of.

 

IRL- Today is the first day of our 8th year in this ever-changing lifestyle!

 

 

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DH, 2 DDs, DS, two small dogs and I lived in a travel trailer for 15 years. We were migrant workers, planting trees for a large company in the West. Our territory was from Mississippi & Alabama all up the East Coast to Maine and also Minnesota. For the most part, we camped on the planting sites. Once in a while we stayed in a campground. DH was the crewleader and at times we had a crew of 20 or more, usually around 15. One year we had 50 people counting wives and kids. That year we had 17 dogs and 8 cats "on the crew" :)

 

We came home for about 2 weeks in April and about 2 weeks in November. The first year the family went with DH (he did this 4 years before we started going with him), that summer I made a packing list. All summer, I would add things to it as I thought of them or used them. Then I kept a copy from year to year. One fall, I had the flu at packing time but the kids (then DD1 was 13, DS was 10, and DD2 was 8) did all the packing just going by my list. DH was out on sales trips bidding on the land for planting.

 

The first year we had a 17' pull trailer and no refrigerator. About mid way through the season, in FL, DH found a used camper fridge. We sure were tickled with it! Later on we got a 24' pull trailer, then a 40' 5th wheel and finally the last two years a newer 5th wheel. We bought a generator after a few years but didn't run it all the time, just when we wanted to use the Bosch to make bread. All the crew wives would hurry over to our trailer with their mixers, blenders, etc and we'd make a day of cooking with things that required electricity. They would all chip in on the gas for the generator.

 

We made many good friends that we still keep in touch with and saw a lot of the US that we wouldn't have been able to afford seeing otherwise. We left this life in 1998 when DH was injured in a work-related accident. I'm glad to be home and putting down roots:)

 

Daylily

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I will have to think about this one. It is scary, because it could too easily be me. I lost my job in September and have been living on preps and unemployment. The place I live in was sold. Thanks to a law that they past I have 90 days ( till the middle of April) to find a place to move to. I have one small car, two cats, a dog and my daughter. That would fill most of the car, so I would have the trunk or top to put things in if I had to leave. For now, I am thinking I will go to family if I have to, but I am hoping to find a place to move to before the money I have to move is used up. To narrow done what I have to what I can take would be hard. I would probably store what I have at my brothers because he has a garage. So stuff like pictures could be left for him, yet even that is scary because he is out of work, doing odd jobs for money as it is now. As for thinking of unemployment, I have several friends ( half of the nurses and aides where I used to work) as well as three family members who are all out of work. The shortest lenght of time is since October while the longest has been out of work for years due to an injury. He is still waiting to be approved for disability but can not work. There are 7 in his family, but luckily they are staying on some land his family had in an old beat up trailer and have animals and room to plan. I probably would take of looking for work someplace and hope that my stuff stays safe with my brother, but my daughter and animals have to go with me. Maybe I could get a trailer to add more room. I am already trying to trim down un-needed stuff, but I will have to think what I would take if I had to leave like that. Like I said, it is scary because although I know I would probably stay with family, the animals might be a problem with some of them. I do have camping stuff so it would have to go, and that is probably where we would sleep wherever we stopped. I will think over what I have and would need to take and get back to you later.

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Thanks for sharing your personal experiences Daylilly and Mik! I think we have already come to an era of time that "living mobile" is not so unusual. Still not the first choice for most people but as you both [as well as a gazillion retired RV'ers ] have demonstrated, it's an option. Better to plan and head into it with knowledge than to be suddenly dumped into it.

 

Deb2of9, I'm so sorry to hear this hitting so close for you. But that's why I do these uncomfortable ones. Maybe something here will help. Y'know, I had to read it twice...about NURSES being laid off. Oh nonononono! That's a Red Flag. Seems like we always need nurses/nursing assistants. Praying you find employment and a replacement for the home that is being sold. :grouphug:

 

 

Oh WOW!!!!! NMchick, that site is extraordinary. And since I've lived for most of one year, on our totally undeveloped land [except ...before the era of cell phones... had a phone installed in a wooden box! ] and have been the director of a homeless outreach and have lived with relatives/had relatives live with us....... I can tell you that the pages of data I've read so far sound pretty real.

 

If there is any chance someone might have to spent time living with a "distributed household" as she calls it, this is a good read.

 

Here is the first paragraph. Very much reminded me of when DH and I [ plus dog, cat, assorted ducks/geese and 2 horses] were fire-evacuated for 3 weeks. Still have employment, mail, "barn yard" etc but it was scattered over three counties. :0327: Exhausting way to live. Very inefficient in time and energy. But one can do it. [well, finding a "barn yard " for one's animals on a long-term basis would be a challenge certainly. In a mere 3 wks I had to move my horses THREE times. And I was going to feed them X2 daily. Hmmm....

 

Tuesday, October 19, 2004

Introduction to the Project

 

I spent nearly five years, from mid-1996 to the beginning of 2001, homeless, or as I liked to call it with a distributed household. I had storage, shelter, mailbox, telephone, shower, bathroom facilities, cooking equipment, and transportation, even access to television, radio, computer equipment, and ac power. I had the essence of a home. It was simply more geographically scattered than is traditional in our culture.

 

 

Thanks NMchick! :thumbs:

 

MtRider [rather not do this Bohemian thing again ..cuz of the animals, but..... times are changing.]

Edited by Mt_Rider
fixin' stuff

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I've had a few adventures that would prepare me for this scenario. I've stayed in tents for weeks at a time, 6 months in an old school bus we converted into a camper (without bathroom), and 1 year in a camper on my land with no running water. Oh yes, once with a toddler still in diapers and hyperactive child, a dog, and another adult in a medium sized dome tent. In the converted bus, 3 of us adults, 2 little kids, 1 dog and 1 cat. In comparison, living with 1 teen, 1 other adult, 1 cat and 4 dogs in a camper was paradise. :) We all survived.

 

Life gets simplified and you learn to live closer to nature. It can be really rough and scary at times, but God brings some really wonderful people into your life when you need them.

 

Things I'd pack: solar showers, tarps for using as awnings and such, rope, my cast iron dutch oven on legs (heavy, but worth every pound), propane stove, pie irons, lightweight pots and pan (minimal), 2 dishpans, my Volcano, 2 ice chests, doggie tie out chains, raincoats!, more towels than you think you need

Tent or two, even if taking the camper 'cause sometimes you need extra space. Extra tent stakes, folding shovel, axe, 1 gallon water bottles for hauling water (much easier to carry than bigger containers, can be filled in rest stops, and easier to tuck in nookies and crannies in the car)

long heavy duty extension cords (for those times you stay some where with power)

 

There are a lot of federal forests where you can camp for free and pets allowed if kept under control. No showers, but some have porta-a-pottys and a community water spigot. We would take sponge baths daily. So what we would do is stay a few days in the free spots, then move for one night to the paid camping where we could shower and charge up flashlights and other things.

 

 

 

 

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We've had a few experiences in our life with living rough but never living on the road except for the weeks we've been out in the Motor Home in the last couple of years. This is a good exercise for me.

 

A couple of years back I had a thread about making our Motorhome a BOB. Cookiejar called it the 'bug-out-mobile and that pretty well fit it. It has pretty much been kept outfitted as that all this time. The problem is that it was not outfitted to become a permanent lifestyle but a temporary one with all the intentions of eventually heading 'home'. It does contain seed and etc to be able to set up a long-term camp but our home has always been the one intended for 'the' bug out location for others.

 

Even my involvement in the Wagons Ho thread in the Pioneer Living forum won't help as much here. What I listed to take with me in the 'wagon' was more focused on setting up a homestead after we got there. A nomadic lifestyle would be a different setting all together, one that I actually contemplated some time back because we were thinking of going RVing at least a good part of the year, still are.

 

IF we could not afford to buy something different, even though gas would be more expensive for it, I believe I would take the Motor Home. It would give us more space for the cost compared to the Van with the bed in it for only a little more gas. If we were to buy something different I believe I might want a cheaper running vehicle that would pull a camping trailer. That way we'd have transportation without having to drive the entire rig each time. We might also be able to do more 'stealth' camping if needed.

 

Our home is paid for; the taxes are cheap so in our case, being evicted would mean that we were forced in some way to leave. Perhaps from rioting, from a nuclear event, from flooding or from another cause but whatever, it’s possible we would not be able to sell our home for extra cash. We would have a lot of items to sell but if times are that bad would anyone have money to buy them? Thankfully, we would most likely have everything we might need for a nomadic lifestyle already on hand and pretty much already in the MH.

 

I have thought about the pro’s and cons of traveling in mass with other migrants but feel that if we were looking for jobs we might be better off to find them here and there individually instead of vying for a few jobs among hundreds. I would not want to be totally alone though. In the past Depression I believe it was a bit safer to be on the road alone. Most people were of the decent sort and all tried to work together. You will find that in a lot of people still today but if the situation that MtR suggests does come about, it could be a very dangerous way to live. Several vehicles in a small caravan, preferably family members, would lend help and security to traveling.

 

I would want the ability to 'grow' fresh produce/herbs/salads while we were traveling. I would probably do that with sprouts for the most part though I know from experience that I can grow quite a bit on the dinette and in hanging pots in the MH. I would also consider potted plants that I set outside when we were stationary. I would opt for lightweight pots but perhaps ones that could be chained down if needed lest unscrupulous people carry them away. I would also be looking for 'pick-your-own' places and/or find places we were allowed to glean leftovers from fields. Most produce would be dehydrated for storage as that takes up a lot less space and I've done it many times in the MH in the past.

 

I'd like the ability to do most of the cooking outside in summer to keep down the moisture and heat for more comfort. (in stealth cooking that would be difficult but not impossible) I'm sure I won't always have wood available so that would mean being versatile with other fuel. I would make use of solar for cooking as much as possible to save fuel and I would probably eat a lot more raw or minimally cooked foods than now. I would opt for a few versatile cast iron pots along, some with legs and lids with flanges to hold coals, others flat bottomed; and then light weight Stainless steel nesting ones for the rest. (Just what is already in the Motor Home now) I would bring my multi-fuel camp stove and also my small ‘newspaper’ cooker as that can burn a variety from the newspapers to corn husks to dry leaves to twigs and still be productive. I would also be sure to bring along my insulated cookers as well as a small electric rice steamer in case we had electric. I already have several small 12-volt appliances in the MH and would use them when needed as well.

 

We have a large gas/electric refrigerator with good sized freezer in the Motor Home but we also have a couple of smaller 12-Volt cooler/refrigerators that I would try to find room for, perhaps just strapped on the outside. I would add a couple of really good regular coolers not only for extra temporary cold storage but to use as insulated cookers and for water if needed.

 

I would definitely have a screen house and a couple of extra tents. The screen house could do double duty as a dehydrating room and could be used for sleeping in if the heat was too intense and no electricity to run the AC.

 

I would add several buckets with lids and a medium sized Rubbermaid (or similar study) garbage can with wheels and lid for laundry, storage, and etc. We have a shower in the MH but also a hanging solar shower. I already have a folding wire basket cart with good-sized wheels in the Motor Home. It has been invaluable many times and takes up very little space.

 

It is amazing the things I thought about to bring along. Things like books; and my smaller looms and yarn; and flats and pots for herbs and plants; and the list went on and on but mostly things that were not necessary to life on the road, just those things that would make it seem more homelike. I would replace them readily with tools for DH so he could pick up extra work when needed and a lap top computer for me to continue with my writing and perhaps earn some sort of living as well.

 

We would most likely put the tools in the trailer that we often pull behind us. It would also contain my electric scooter, a couple of bikes and a small motorcycle or two. (That’s what it DOES carry now). (okay so I’m not mentioning that I want to put the little Nigerian milk goat and a couple of hens there too..LOL)

 

I’m sure there are many things that I should be adding and probably more things I would eliminate as we gained knowledge along the way. But I sure hope I don’t HAVE to do this IRL unless we CHOOSE to do it.

 

:bighug2:

 

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Sure am liking this thread! We have considered that if we need work and all is ok with the world, then we travel to find work. If an event happens, then we stay in place at least for a while as traveling would be more dangerous. We choose small towns and get to know folks always keeping possible future events in mind-probably because of time spent here. It is just a part of our lifestyle and has been for several years.

 

Mother--What is a "newspaper cooker"? It sounds like a really good idea. And I am getting one of those folding basket carts before all of the vendors are gone from here.

 

Mtn. Rider-- I don't know that I would even still be married if this had been forced on me! Close quarters for an extended period of time unwillingly! Yikes! Knowing that we actually wanted to try this made a big difference. Attitude is a major component! When we saw how small our living quarters actually were, we "manufactured" a good attitude that got us throught the first year or so intact. Didn't even have the laptop then so I could complain to you folks!

 

Actually one day we may unload the trailer and set up a homestead, so to speak. Thanks to you all, we could probably do fine without elec. or indoor plumbing! When we leave here in a couple of months I will try to get back to what and how and where we pack things.

 

 

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I read this thread again and followed some of the links which are really good. I think the one thing to remember is KISS - keep it simple stupid. You would be surprised what you can do without if you have knowledge. You don't need a kitchenaid mixer with the bread attachment to make bread you have to hands that will work just fine. A mixer...you just need a good sturdy wisk or rotary mixer that you crank by hand. My mother and grandmother always told me that when it come to basics in the kitchen don't cut corners. A good set of cookware will last you for ever. The cookware that I got as a wedding present was till good when we lost everything. It will take a little extra money but when you are contastly having to replace stuff you will soon learn that a $25 skillet is not a bad investment especially when you buy the $12 and have to replace it.

 

Disclaimer* I do not sell it but I stand by it....tupperware is a good investment at least their storage containers are. They last and last and if you ever have to replacement they have a life time warranty on them. It is something to think about.

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Snapshotmiki, The stove is really a grill. It's called a Qwik-Cook Grill. Here's the only link I could find for it in a quick search. http://users.aristotle.net/~shicks/qwikcook/index.html They aren't very big so don't give you a lot of cooking space. They're a bit biggerand taller than a three quart pot. I have two and both came from flea markets for about five dollars. The pieces fit together to make a small grill that fires with almost anything quick buring but i've used hard wood in mine as well as a couple briquettes of charcoal but they will get hot. You can use a pan on the top and heat water fairly fast. We have one in the Motor Home and one in the house but if we had to live on the road I'd try to find room for both.

 

MT3B, I agree with you on both the Tupperware and the quality of cookware. I use cast iron and heavy Stainless steel almost exclusively. Both are really durable. The older Tupperware can get sticky and I've found that some of that they won't replace. I was wondering though about the chemical in them after there was all the scare about using plastics.

 

:bighug2:

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"You don't need a kitchenaid mixer with the bread attachment to make bread you have to hands that will work just fine. "

 

I know you don't. I've made bread by hand for years but I do appreciate and enjoy my Bosch mixer and plan to use it until it quits or the electricity is no more.

 

Weight is a BIG issue with living on the road. DH was constantly fussing at me about the weight of the stuff I packed, especially books and food.

 

Growing food in pots should work great. We always had pots of annual flowers in Maine, etc in the summer so food ought to work too.

 

Blessings,

Daylily

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