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CLee

Spinners, weavers, sewers, knitters, etc

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I got out my basic sock book last night and chose a basic sock instruction and read it a couple times. I was able to understand more as I found written instructions on the stitch methods for the heel.... the lightbulb in my brain finally went on. Maybe I can manage to do the sock heel, etc by myself and get busy on the second sock . They are just to wear around the house actually.

 

some one else may have no problems catching on faster to such things but I do have a problem with vaguely written stuff or if its too much together. Or a bunch of steps you take, so had to break it down more for myself and usually if someone shows me and I just practice that step til I Have it in my mind well , then I am ok, but I went back and found the info ended up being more clearly written than the pattern xerox'd gave. Maybe I can figure out cable stitch next, its not really difficult, just the actual handling of it will be abit touchy til I do practice it... one more tiny skill that enhances the product.

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Yesterday, I was looking for pictures of lace for a drawing I am doing. Boy did I get side tracked on that project.

 

Google search turned up so many pretties.

 

Tatted lace designs were tantalizing! (I saved a bunch of them and want to make so many new patterns.)

 

Then, I saw a picture of bobbin lace..

bobbinlace6a.jpg

 

 

 

The designs are outstanding. Time to pull out my bobbins again and try some of them.

 

:woohoo:

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CGA, you are right, Knitting instructions ARE a foreign language. :grinning-smiley-044:

 

Annarchy, I haven't tried doing bobbin lace. It always looks fun and challenging though. Please let us see pictures if you start a project.

 

My daughter used to do what she calls hair braiding. It's done with a round table with a hole in the center and the hair is on bobbins to braid it. It's what they used to make some hair jewelry on. I wish she'd take it up again. It was pretty neat to watch.

 

:bighug2:

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Viking re-enactment groups use it and it's smashing. The technique is older, stemming at least from Egyptian times.

It makes for stretchy, strong netting that can be used for anything.

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Gee, Thanks, CGA.....Now I have MORE projects I want to try. :grinning-smiley-044:

 

I have actually seen this before but this web site really explains it well and I can see it's a bit like the finger weaving. In thinking what I might be able to use to do this on I realized that I had some frames that once held hanging files that might work. I'm going to have DH dig them out today and we'll see.

 

Christy, I've seen dozens of different kinds of reenactments, participated in half of them myself, but never a Viking one. I bet that is something to see. Knowing and learning the skills of the past has a direct link with being prepared today. Not to mention the fact that if we don't carry these skills into the future they will be lost.

 

:bighug2:

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A few years ago I spend some time at the Foteviken museum in south Sweden.

http://www.foteviken.se/

If you press reenactment you get info in English.

 

Is a video of the Open Air museum in Eindhoven, Netherlands. I wanted to join a group there but found it too far away to visit weekly. Viking re-enactments are great. You can learn a lot about primitive living and the fighting is something I'd recommend to anyone. Skills skills skills...

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It looks like something a person could do if they were in the woods with nothing but a knife and needed fabric or a net or bag. I can find all sorts of materials to twine for rope or thread and if I have a skill where I can take a few sticks for a "loom" then I can make the articles I need.

 

You'd want to know what to look for to make your fiber from.

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CGA I like the sprang, it would be worth learning how, although fibrous and vine like plants are only really available here in the warm months and somewhat into fall where you could soak dried grasses some to revive flexibility.

Sprang seems simple enough to learn and surely does not require more than rudimentary things to make ropes and weaving belts and netting, so it would be a very useful skill and looks easy to learn. ( Something even I could remember after some practice! )

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ok, finally got back to the sock knitting today.. doing the heel flap then have to practice the next part where it joins into the instep and knit that part too. Wish me luck.

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Long story, but re starting socks.... had to review sock books, because I figured out the printed out instructions are not clear enough, and lo and behold........ there are great diagrams and illustrations on each step of knitting a sock in this book I have. LOL.

It also was appropriate as ticked off as I got at poor Lu Ellen who has been trying to teach me so intermittently.

 

Ok, 2nd go round ended up the dpn needles were too big and the top edge was soft and ripply, reallllllly ripply. It could be nice for a lacey sock but this is just for a boot sock....

 

k.... well funny how when you look at things after you have had enough sleep again....... and Stephanie came to mind. Her stuff is always so nicely done.... so I undid it, rolled up the yarn and started over with the right size dpns.... and have almost got it perfectly comfortable and its coming together much more quickly, my hands can do a lot more for a lot longer..... and yes, the sock looks much better!

 

Have been busy with clutter stuff and things, kitchen stuff too so it goes in bits and pieces but it finally is beginning to gel and I feel alot more comfortable which lends me confidence as it finally comes together much better~!

 

well we shall see if I picked the right size dpns when the sock is done, lol. The sock will be a bit loose if they are too big, but I have a good array, although it appears size 2 will work with the caron simply soft yarn for me. I ordered a second set so I can do both of a pair at the same time. Sometimes that makes it easier to match the socks as you knit them more perfectly. I can order second sets of particular sizes as I figure it out. It could vary with various yarns too but over time I will figure that out too.

 

It brings me peace to be able to do something that makes something good and useful and looks nice.

 

I did do a nice scarf too that matches my winter jacket too. It was easy. But a year ago it was also a total fumble and I set that stuff aside til I got brave enough. I try to not overdo it as my hands can only take so much and I found some good thimbles to order. I need them for an index finger and a thumb , lol.

 

the wheels turn in my head about more that I would like to do, but this is plenty for now. One thing at a time works a lot better for me anyhow. but I am thinking about sweaters and tops too. I got another great sweater book that is easy to understand.

 

but it is starting to be more natural now and I am figuring it out. that is the most important thing. Eventually the creative side of me can implement variations as I learn more of the basics.

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Nice one Arby. It takes a bit of mind-bending to get your head around a new technique. Knitting in the round is a different kind of knitting anyway. So credit for perseverance. :darlenedance:

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Congratulations Arby. I also had a couple of false starts with my first pair of socks and had to take them out. I did tons of tube socks before Christy directed me to a good way to turn a heel and now I have it. I still have to follow the directions when I first start the heel but at least it finally turns out nice.

 

I ended up with #1 DPN's because I tend to knit so loosely and that's about the right size for me but they are really small to work with. A friend gave me some sock yarn that is supposed to make a pattern automatically when you knit, we'll see. I haven't started them yet for the same reason you mentioned, clutter/cleaning/kitchen stuff but I will soon.

 

I did get a few more warp braids done for warping my floor loom but that is slow going for me because of my muscles. I have 120 out of 330 done though so slowly getting there.

 

Keep knitting, Arby, and let us know how it's coming.

 

What are the rest of you working on now? Anything?

 

:bighug2:

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Congratulations Arby, looking forward to hearing how they come out. Mother, you are 1/3 the way there!

 

I have a thousand ideas I want to do. However, priorities are taking up most my time right now. As soon as I get my year end accounting/reports/taxes done, and then, finish the illustrations for my Aunt, then, I hope to be able to pick up my crafts again.

 

My tatted doily disappeared off the coffee table, we think Frank pulled it off and ate it, (Bad ferret! NO!), I need to crochet and tat a couple replacements.

 

Cleaning clutter around here on my breaks also. I started looking at my supplies, focusing on finding my bobbin lace kit which I put up in a safe place where it would not get unraveled, instead, I found the quilt I have been working on for 10 years~all hand sewn and still has a long way to go before it is finished. Good grief. :Blushing:

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Good for you, Arby!

I'm working on my first ever sock. I bought an adjustable sock loom. Slower than with needles but for someone who frequently has to jump up and see about something or someone 2 or 3 times in one round, it works well. Once in a while I get several rounds done in one sitting! LOL

I'm also learning to spin.

Since I am also putting fences back up and trying to deal with housework, milking and 2 bottle kids, I'm fairly busy.

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Congrats Arby!

 

Our daughter had her baby and I've been busy here. Had to make some covers for the baby bed she bought since Jamie was only 5 lbs, 5 ounces. It's kind of like a Moses basket type thing. She'll be in that until Mandi feels comfortable letting her sleep in the crib in the next room and until she's going longer between bottles. Right now she's wanting to go anywhere from 1-2.5 hours between feedings. She's full term and is just fine, just a small baby.

 

Since she is small she needs help keeping her body temp regulated. Well, store bought socks swallow her so it's a good thing "Grammy Lee" knows how to knit socks! I've been knitting little socks for her to help keep her little tootsies warm. They are the only socks that stay on too.

 

I've gone through all the scraps I had on hand and can't really afford to buy a bunch of full size skeins for 1/2 ounce for different socks for her. I found a few listings on Etsy for mini-skeins that will work. Found one that the lady had 10 different skeins in the sale all in rainbow colors so Jamie will have socks for just about any outfit whe wears now. Can't wait to get the yarn to get knitting again!

 

Can't wait to get back into some sort of routine here. I know it will take a little bit for Jamie to hit a routine and then hoepfully we'll be able to hit a routine too.

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hey ladies! Great about the sock loom. I think I have a small enough round loom that would work for thick socks. Maybe sometime I will try that. I use the dpn knitting for socks at this point, traditional. Just went ahead and ordered another full set for dpns, so I can work on both socks at one time or have extras. Some sock knitters like doing it that way so they can match length of top and colors more exactly and that sounds like that would be helpful to me. Plus I consider these a prep item to have the adequate supplies. I know I could go out and get some wood and whittle some needles if I really needed to but its nice to have the metal ones I am finding I am most comfortable with.

Traditional socks use turning the heel and making the gusset area, which I can see how its done with regular needles but does the sock loom do that too? I wonder how that works if its that complex or just to make tube socks?

 

One of the reasons I wanted to learn to do traditional dpn knitting is that I can learn to adjust exactly, where I want on a sock I am making for myself to make sure I have a truly comfy fit once I get the basics down.

 

oh, and decided to order the 3 rubber thimbles, they are rubbery, stippled little bands of thick rubber and I thought that might suit me, if they will stay in position where I need them to protect my fingers I tend to use so much , pushing the ends of the dpn , is a tendency I have and with the fibro and RA and stuff anything that makes my fingers and hands work less hard is a true boon!

 

I also found a lovely short sleeve cotton blouse with a nice easy style ( pattern) I would love to have. I think it would be very comfortable to wear and look very nice. It would be nice during spring or fall or inside wear during winter here. My Icelandic friend even liked its looks when I posted it on FB, and they are the king when it comes to making nice knit wear . ( I still want some Icelandic housesocks! ) Maybe I can learn enough of knitting though to get a pattern for them and do them myself before next winter. Or figure out how to do them myself as they really are a loose fitting type of sock that goes up to under the knees. Traditionally what they put on in the house as they do not wear shoes in the house. They were very comfortable and durable.

 

Well have groceries to put away and nachos with whole grain tortilla chips to make for the superbowl so will stop in later!

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Would love to see that top! Might be one to put on my long "to do" list.

 

I hope to get the time this year to knit this sweater for my mom for her birthday in Dec - Buttercup Sweater Since they live in FL she can wear it a majority of the year. I was showing her some sweaters on Ravelry when visitng them last year and she liked this one.

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It sure sounds like you all have some projects in mind even if you can't start them yet.

 

Sorry, but I couldn't help laugh at Frank and his penchant for tatted doilies. Are you sure he didn't just decorate his home with it, knowing quality stuff when he sees it? :grinning-smiley-044:

 

CGA, like Arby, I have some small round looms I've always wondered if I could make socks on but I know that's not what you have. Would love to see a pic of it.

 

Arby, congratulations on your progress. I have the same problem with pushing the points of my needles and having sore fingers but after a while they get tough and I don't notice.

 

CLee, Aren't grand kids wonderful. Sounds like you are having a great time with your tiny one. I love the looks of the Buttercup sweater. It doesn't look real difficult but still has some really pretty borders.

 

IGP, nice to hear from you. I haven't used elastic thread in regular socks but I've used it in the cuff of tube socks to help hold them up. The trick is not to use too thick of elastic and not to pull it much when you are knitting it. Hard to do! First one I did it with I pulled out three times before I got the hang of it but when I got done I still wasn't entirely happy with it. It sort of makes the yarn it's knitted with pucker. It wasn't too bad to wear though. Let us know if you try it.

 

Great catching up. :happy0203:

 

:bighug2:

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