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SOCK%20LOOM-2.jpg

 

This is the loom I have, the knitting board adjustable loom. It came with a dvd that showed exactly how to turn the heel and the toe and how to do the three types of stitch, bind off and cast on.

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Sock knitting-have any of you added elastic thread in with the yarn used to make them more stretchy and easier to get on? I;m thinking about doing this.

 

Adding elastic isn't going to make the socks stretch any more, but it will make them tighter once they are on your foot.

 

Cascade Yarn makes a brand called Fixation which is 98% cotton and 2% elastic. As long as you are careful not to pull it as you knit it makes wonderful stretchy socks and footie socks. It's also my favorite yarn for fingerless gloves.

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Cool CGA!

ok.... you want more stretch.... like in the top of the sock ? you can adjust it with same stitches as per usual you use on the sock but with how you do the ribbing. I need to look at the book but I found the description of how to do it for narrow leg, average leg, and heavier legs and chose a roomier type than what the original instructions tell you to do when you are knitting and purling the top of the sock , to alleviate too much tightness, according to my legs... that is. To get more stretch, basically do a triple rib not just double. If you figure it out great, if not I can get the knitting instructions later for you if you want.

does this help?

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Cascade Yarn makes a brand called Fixation which is 98% cotton and 2% elastic. As long as you are careful not to pull it as you knit it makes wonderful stretchy socks and footie socks. It's also my favorite yarn for fingerless gloves.

 

Leanna, thanks for the info. I might have to try some as I made fingerless gloves last year for my DD and she loved them. I'd like to make a few more pair for others and especially for my hunter guys.

 

CGA. I have several knitting boards of different sizes. They are very easy to make. I haven't used one of them for knitting in the round as I also have different sizes of round looms as well. Does the center partition come out of yours so it can be used for straight knitting, for say a scarf? The knitting board can give a wonderful thick scarf with all sorts of different patterns. I was wondering if you can do both pair of socks at the same time, one on each side. It looks like you would need another row of center pegs and pegs at both ends to do that maybe? I can see where it would be easy to stop and start on the sock without having to figure out where you are. That's a really nice looking loom. Looks like I need to explore the possibilities in my small looms more closely. Only wish there was more time and energy to do it all :grinning-smiley-044:

 

:bighug2:

Edited by Mother

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The center part slides up and down, you loosen the wing nut first. You can do a flat item if you work back and forth instead of around and around. You can't really do two socks at once. I think it would be really hard to have a second slider on it. You basically count how many rows you do for one sock then duplicate that on the other. The socks I'm making are nice and thick and tightly knit, just as I like them. They will be great boot socks or to wear to bed. My feet get pretty cold sometimes.

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Yes, grands are the best! :happy0203: Sure are having fun having her around for now. She'll be leaving in a few months when her husband comes home from deployment. :sEm_blush: House sure will feel empty then.

 

My best friend's daughter just found out she is pregnant last month. Between my grandbaby and hers it's nice having little ones to knit for again. I've done a lot of charity knitting, but it's different when you know who it's going to, ya know?!

 

I've never used elastic in my socks. You may want to play around with your stitch count for cast on, that can make a difference in how well they stay up too. Sometimes it's finding that magic number for you. My husband likes his socks really tight and I like mine a little looser. Make some test socks to play around with that as well.

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Thanks for the info-I checked on stretchy sock yarn but it was $5.00 here and it makes only one sock? Thats $10.00 for one pair?

 

That's a pretty good price. Cascade Fixation goes for 6-7 dollars a ball here. I am a size 7 1/2 shoe and from one ball I can get a pair of anklets with 1 1/2 inch ribbing at the top. There is usually a small amount left over. If you're making socks that will go up over your calf, 2 balls would do it.

 

Unless you inherit your sock yarn, find a big bargain at a yard sale, or repurpose old sweaters - you're not going to save money making your own socks. However, I find it's worth it for the fit, the fabulous colors and most important - the stress relief that knitting brings me. :happy0203:

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Thanks for the info-I checked on stretchy sock yarn but it was $5.00 here and it makes only one sock? Thats $10.00 for one pair?

Does it have to be stretchy sock yarn? Cos that is a price that would put me off.

I get either wool that's rather thick for winter socks or sock yarn that is a bit stronger than average. And my socks keep for years on end and any holes are repaired cos you have a bit of wool left always.

Sometimes I knit in a thread of sewing yarn in the heel and toes to make it longer lasting. Great trick that helps to not wear it down so quickly, just not the easiest thing to juggle, wool and thin thread together.

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alot of the yarns for socks can be much higher in price, if they are wool blends especially.

I received some sockease from amazon orders recently and want to try it as it is thinner but seems smooth enough to knit well. Its reasonable and each skein is large enough for a pair of standard socks for women's feet.

I am using some carons simply soft right now, which also makes lovely clothing and its not bad to work with. mostly acrylic so it won't wear as long as wool blends but it seems stretchy enough as I am knitting it up to be comfortable and fairly thick as a sock. The price is decent through amazon too. It also is often on the shelf at Walmart too. Which makes that handy if you stop in there at the sewing area.

With the carons I find a no 2 dpn works alot better than a no 4 dpn for a close enough knit. I will have to try on that first sock and see how it turned out, lol, to give a final appraisal when it is finished but doing the heel flap just now. Gusset hopefully tonight and start knitting the foot hopefully.

 

With the sockease yarn it will be much smaller needles and I will need to play a bit with the dpns to see which will be adequate when I do a gauge patch. It is recommended that if you are not familiar with the gauges of different yarns to do a 6 inch square patch instead of just 4 inches. It tends to give you more accuracy on stitches per inch sideways and up and down if you do, as per Ann Budd I believe. If not her, it was from another pro knitter of socks I am familiar with.

One thing to do is make the patches up for gauge and make a notebook with them taped inside it so you can go back and identify what is most suitable for the type of sock or item you want to knit. For me that is a very helpful idea.

 

Off to do some chores and will check back later.

 

one thing about wool blends is that they do stay cool in summer actually. Alot of folks only wear them year round.

 

I am looking at cotton blends too.

Edited by arby

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Update...... sock making skills.....

I have succeeded in doing heel turn, the gusset is coming along and have been seeing how it all works as I go, referring to Ann Budds book on basic sock knitting. At last, I am catching on. Almost to the foot part. A few more counts to be sure as I go, and then it should be all in alignment . Phew!

I actually stylized it some too as I have knitted. I like what I did although a perfectionist teacher would say no, do it this way and pulled it out. I have seen such styling on socks and I am wondering if it might actually add a custom comfort level. I will test it out and see if it feels ok and does what I think it will.

( I might just be on to something here! )

 

Miss Macy has been keeping me company and was a real tease earlier, hiding under the bed and tickling the foot I tend to let hang down. She was delighted to make me jump quite a few times. :sHa_sarcasticlol:

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:thumbs: Well, how cool is that!!!! That's a beautiful color on top of it. Do you have plans to use it for a project or are you going to 'frame' it as your first yarn?

 

Congratulations CGA :eclipsee_Victoria:

 

:bighug2:

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I like you choice of colors on the yarn, nice that you were able to spin it up .

* sitting here listening to Delilah on the radio and knitting the sock foot part tonight.

 

* tossing the mousie for Miss Macy. She is having fun getting a run in this way. She is good at bringing it back and dropping it at my feet. She says: reowwwwwwwwwww , each time she dashes after it, lol. sort of in a tiny cat voice. Makes me laugh.

Edited by arby

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Yeah, wtg CGA. You made yarn and it's a good feeling innit?

It's really cool to be able to make the basics you need to produce materials (if this makes sense in English).

 

The possible future perhaps maybe mr Christy has a birthday coming up the 11th of march and is getting socks. Made by yours truly.

Hope he'll think of me when he has warm feet. :grinning-smiley-044:

Now a matter of choosing yarn and finding out his shoesize. Gazing in one's eyes leaves a girl a bit hazy about the man's feet :sHa_sarcasticlol:

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Thanks guys!

 

Christy, yes it is a good feeling to take that next step of being able to go from raw material to something useable. This yarn was spun from some roving I was given, but I'm learning to spin from raw wool that I prepared too. Good luck on the sock measurements! LOL

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Here is another site for making a drop spindle. http://danielson.laurentian.ca/qualityoflife/Fulltext/Textiles/Making_a_cd_drop_spindle.htm

It's pretty cheap to make , works great, and I can spin a lot of yarn onto it if I choose. The part the site calls a "blind well nut" was not called that at the hardware store.

I cannot remember the name of it tho.

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Hi everyone!

I love to knit ans sew. I can crochet, too. My grandparents were weavers and i h ave a kromski rigid heddle loom, as well as a spinning wheel that my grandfather made. I wantto weave and learn how to spin. I am currently knitting my hubby a pair of slippers and a shawl for myself.

Carrie

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