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ladyblu72

Dehyrating Frozen Vegetables??

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I have a Excalur and tons of frozen bags of vegetables in the freezer..I have heard you can dehyrate them and put them in jars..

 

Anyone do it and how was it?

 

How long do you dry them?

Thanks..

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I dehydrate frozen veggies all the time. Just be sure to break up any clumps and check once in awhile to make sure they are spread out well. It depends on the size of the pieces , the bigger ones like cut green beans may take a little longer. I use a nesco with a temperature setting for veggies. Its been a while but at least several hours 5 -14 usually. I just keep checking . Once they are brittle clear through, they are dry usually. I do put mine in spare jars to use daily and you would want to vaccuum pack them to last longer. Vaccuum packed jars will usually last about 18 months.

If you live in a humid climate you will need to use them fairly fast because they do absorb moisture again if you only put them in jars. Still . I get about 3 months so far no problems from dehydration and putting in jars to use rather than long term storage, safely.

 

It is better to vacuum seal them if you can of course. ( I am going to try and get a foodsaver and cannister set for jars so I can do that along with bags if my son will get me the foodsaver for moms day.)

 

If you use bags to vacuum seal you want to make sure the veggies don't pierce the bag.

I use those generic walmart mixed nut containers after they are empty of nuts alot of the time as they are handy. The plastic containers, not cardboard types.

 

Not sure what weight that would carry of frozen weight, but can put about 4 lbs of dried frozen veggies in a quart jar? ( fuzzy on this . ) It could be a pint canning jar that holds that much , but you get the idea?

 

I was planning on doing a lot of frozen veggies dehydrating next month after I get paid the 2nd. I need more! With prices as they are, and going up again..... I have to do a bunch up. At this point whatever I can do helps me out and its easier to transport dried stuff than canned wet stuff for me.

 

Also , dried food is more dense and takes up less space and it works great in my small kitchen and apartment regarding how many servings in a space.

I make soups and stews and spaghetti type sauces with them and rehydrate and cook for sides as well.

 

Green beans, as an example, look awful dried up but rehydrate pretty well if you try them. (You need to blanch fresh vegetables and peel some before blanching btw) before drying however. It may not look like what the folks are used to, but its nutritious and one can learn to use them easily.

I think we need to change our picky mentality somewhat about some things. But humans have always adapted!

 

I also slice and dehydrate apples and peaches if I can get decent peaches. Bananas too because I can't eat them fast enough.

The peach slices taste like candy , like a slip of sweet paper when you put it on your tongue. Banana chips you make at home are softer and chewier and very much like very sweet candy, rather than crisp. They fry them first for commercially made banana chips, which gives them the crispness.

 

if you have people with sweet-tooths in the household, guard the dehydrating and storage of banana chips! lol. Or they end up eating them up before you know it! :grinning-smiley-044:

 

Five pounds of bananas fit in the average large Peanut Butter jars, minimum . It could be more? Dried as chips.

Maybe someone else can estimate better

Edited by arby

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Drying frozen is much easier! The stuff is already blanched and cut into uniform pieces, and because the cell walls have been broken by the freezing process, the drying process from frozen to done takes less time than from fresh/blanched to done.

 

My results have been better from frozen. Maybe because I'm too impatient to do every step well.

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Can you dry the frozen asian mix with water chesnuts and baby corn?

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I dry frozen veggies all the time. I just spread the frozen veggies on the tray and turn the machine on. I do use wax paper on the trays to keep them from falling through the slits, especially the corn. Mine is just the round dehydrator...I can't think of the name of it right now to save me. When they are real dry and cool, I put them in a cannning jar and seal them with my food saver attachment. I don't use oxygen absorbers with the food saver. The food saver bags would save more room than the jars but I had some 1/2 gallon jars that I didn't have any other use for. Plus they are pretty... :blush:

 

Trudy, I've never tried the Asian mix. I would think you would have to watch them very carefully since the veggies have a different thickness. I'm sure they would dry at different rates. I've only done one kind of veggie at a time.

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Do you need to use Oxygen absorbers if you are going to vaccum seal them or putting in jars?

 

 

 

I don't use oxygen absorbers when I put my dried veggies (or fruit) in jars.

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I dry frozen veggies all the time. I just spread the frozen veggies on the tray and turn the machine on. I do use wax paper on the trays to keep them from falling through the slits, especially the corn. Mine is just the round dehydrator...I can't think of the name of it right now to save me. When they are real dry and cool, I put them in a cannning jar and seal them with my food saver attachment. I don't use oxygen absorbers with the food saver. The food saver bags would save more room than the jars but I had some 1/2 gallon jars that I didn't have any other use for. Plus they are pretty... :blush:

 

Trudy, I've never tried the Asian mix. I would think you would have to watch them very carefully since the veggies have a different thickness. I'm sure they would dry at different rates. I've only done one kind of veggie at a time.

 

I dehydrated 6 packages of frozen bell pepper mixes (they were on sale for $1 a bag) and got ALL of them in a half gallon jar. Probably could have dried another 2 bags & gotten them in the jar also.

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I'm still working on carrots. I got the crinkle cut ones and was surprised that they come out crinkled after they are rehydrated. I should have known they would but I tried them out anyway.

 

Actually I just popped one in my mouth and waited. :D

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Thought I'd sort of "revive" these posts with one of my favorite frozen vegetable tips for dehydrating...along with pics. During the winter months (and for those of us who have trouble growing cauliflower and broccoli) I've found the "medley" vegetables are wonderful on the trays of a dehydrator. I buy the packages at our local Aldi's for about 2$ a bag and always keep alot of them even in my freezers for a quicky meal.

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