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Ambergris

Grey Cat Garth

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The shipment from Isons Nursery came in today at lunch:

 

1 Jerusalem artichoke root, unnamed kind, hopefully larger and less knobbly than my last kind. Those took forever to scrub or peel.

2 different plum hybrids

1 plum (good old Burbank!)

2 different elderberries for the far end of the pasture nearest the swamp

2 different rabbiteyes

1 scuppernong, hopefully not one of the kinds I am already rooting cuttings of

1 quince

2 different pomegranates

2 different low-chill apples, and 1 crab apple that might be low chill

 

Hopefully, they will all perk up and thrive here. (I really couldn't justify the expense, but I really really wanted these.)  If they don't thrive, we're going to see a fairly pricey learning experience. These were not the two-inch rooted cuttings I got elsewhere last month.  I need to have a load of mushroom compost delivered, because buying enough bags of potting soil for these big bruisers would cost way more than a truckload would, and digging up enough dirt for these is not going to happen this week.

 

As for the rooted cuttings, all but one is going strong.

 

The tomatoes are blooming, right there in their little transplant pots.

 

Still trying to find someone to bush-hog the pasture so I can see what's there.  One thing I know--the place is LOADED with soda apples (isn't that an enticing name for a viciously thorny poisonous rapidly spreading weed?) and I'm going to have to spend HOURS with a lawn torch burning them out.

 

The new reclining loveseat is supposed to be delivered tomorrow.  Couldn't afford the whole suite, but this feels wonderful on my back.

 

The sweet potatoes should arrive in mid-April. I'm also expecting the last nursery shipment, with a load of super-dwarfing apple rootstock, in April. 

 

 

 

Edited by Ambergris
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There are two feral cats.  I'm calling the piebald one Trudie for St. Gertrude, patron saint of cat lovers.  The gray one looks like a Max, from Where The Wild Things Are.  His underfur glows golden when the sunlight hits at a slant, like he's secretly wearing a king's golden robes.

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The shipment from Raintree Nursery--super-dwarfing apple rootstock--has arrived.  In using it, I'm committing to a lifetime of staking, pruning, and caring for the trees.  But they will be MY SIZE!

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Should be getting a dozen rose cuttings this week.

I'm probably going to lose most what I've left at the old house.  It's getting harder and harder to go out there and see anything worthwhile, despite there being furniture and all.  This is as much emotional as physical.  I don't want to be there anymore.  I hear the late DX's voice everywhere.   "Look at this, Babydoll..."

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I'm so sorry Amber  :hug3:

 

I know what you are saying. When my aunt died her son tried to live in the same house. He said he, "Saw my mother in every corner."

 

Not physically but emotionally. He could remember all the little things she used to do and say there. They were sweet memories but he really needed a break away from them before he became consumed by them.

 

I pray for a clean slate for you, a breath of fresh air, a peaceful mind and a joyful heart while moving forward with only a sweet glimpse back now and then.  :pray:

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I recently ordered two batches of plants  off eBay and forgot to put my new address on them.  The mailman caught one and hand-delivered it to me, but the other might spend a week in the transfer station.  The one I got was mostly very tender plants from Wellspring, the home of the two-inch-high starter plants.  When Wellspring plants take off, they REALLY take off.  Wish me luck.

 

The one my mailman didn't catch was rose cuttings from southern Louisiana, which has climate challenges very like my area's.  Wouldn't it be nice to root enough cuttings to replace every poisonous azalea in this yard with a lovely shrub rose?  The roses in place include at least two "knock-out" shrub roses.  I've ordered cuttings of a Buck rose named "Quietness" and an unidentified cherry-red shrub rose.  I'd like to order one called "Marmalade Skies," but not on this paycheck (or next paycheck).  I guess I need to keep watching for sales of cuttings, which are very cheap.  After all, if I'm going to name the place Rosegard, I do need to fill it with roses.

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I HATE wasting stuff cuz I just could not get to something in time.  Be it food in fridge or whatever....  :sigh:  But...sometimes ya just can't fit one more thing in...

 

MtRider  :pc_coffee: 

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The beau came by this morning and cut down the half-dozen gorgeous jasmine bushes in full bloom.  Had to happen.  The satsumas that were here when I arrived are very unhappy plants, and jasmine carries tons of pests and diseases that affect citrus.

Still...jasmine...

 

On a brighter note, topped the tallest citrus (cut down some of the branches/trunks that went way above my reach).  Let the regrowth begin!

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AF1QipP5Tv96DCENmMlrFtIqImniP0OvwDNIS1uALcGP=s512-p-qv=pc9j4909ope6ebncvbhr2fmfl16sjp87f,m=03ad153ca8858d8f45433016aaefa531,x=,t=25-iv489?key=bXpuSmRfY2FDb1oxZVhYWjJsVXk0a1h4Zk1ldlRRBrought home a HAUL today.  Two persimmons, two thornless blackberries, two southern highbush blueberries, an arbequina olive, a seedling loquat,  a Nagami (mostly seedless) kumquat, a mulberry, a shampoo ginger, and so on.

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:woohoo:  Now to get them into the ground!  Will they be watered by the far reaches of H.Flo's weather?

 

Isn't shampoo ginger the same as what they call Awapuhi in Hawaii?   [the W in the middle of word is pronounced "V"]

 

MtRider  :lois: 

 

 

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Unfortunately, we are getting zero rain.  Clearest week we've had in a while.  I'm watering from a rain barrel, because the well water is a bit alkaline still. 

 

This is heritage shampoo ginger.  The elderly gentleman didn't have a name for it, but it makes cones that can be used for skin and hair.  I plan to do a bit of experimenting, when the materials and my energy level coincide.

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I have until March 1 to file a plan that the government will accept as a commercially viable farm, if I want the ag exemption.  After repeatedly demonstrating my inability to translate ground to paper and vice versa, I have opened negotiations with a company to  do that.  Also, having somehow managed to save another document over my inventory (cut and paste error, magnified and layered), I need to re-collate all that information: what I have, its hardiness, its pH requirements and fertilizer requirements and water requirements, when it bears fruit, and so on.  As in, I should be doing this right now.  :(

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Oh, and this has to be actual use, not contemplated use.  They don't expect pecans getting shelled, but they do expect baby trees in the ground.

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Oye....but that ag exemption is a great thing.  Good luck.  Land new-to-you always takes so long to get familiar and settled!  Health issues complicate that severely.

 

MtRider  :cheer:  

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Rooting (no pun intended) for your exemption! I had to go through heck and high water and jump through all kind of hoops to get my homestead exemption but it will be well worth it at tax time. 

 

Yeah, health issues sure do make a difference these days. ;)

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On Thursday, we started twenty-some cuttings to root, mostly goumi (a nitrogen-fixing, sour-fruit producing shrub) and mulberry.  Raccoon or something knocked them over once everyone went inside.  Picked them up and added dirt back in, and possibly even got all the tags and cups and twigs matching.  Overnight, the coon did it again.  So today we did what we should have done to start with--moved twenty-some red plastic cups of dirt and sticks to the screened porch.

Tomorrow I have ten rose cuttings and a couple of dozen pomegranate cuttings to set in the rooting cups, and then I have a jack fruit to pot up.  Seven-gallon pots are available because most of the citrus has been actually planted in the ground. Apples and pears are going into the ground tomorrow, as are some cherries, peaches, pomegranates, olives, quince, plums, and pawpaws.  Also, a couple dozen seed potatoes, about eight elephant garlic, and some perennial scallions.  In my copious amounts of free time, I need to set stakes and string to mark where the greenhouse will be.

There are times in this past couple of weeks when I've had two crews of guys working together.  Expensive, but the deadline to get the ag designation renewed is running very close.  Tuesday I'm picking up the marking paint for these bamboo markers, which will be essential to show where the six-inch tall baby pecans are planted.  The markers actually go out first, as I have to measure sixty feet out from each new marker to find a good place for the next baby  pecan tree.  

Most of the blueberries and thornless blackberries that were in little pots got set off to the side, forgotten, and they died for lack of water.  This was a disappointment.  On the other hand, the guys clearing weeds and brush out of the old orchard found half a dozen blueberries there. Maybe it balances?   I've ordered new blackberries, not enough, but some.  Enough to show what I'm working toward.

 

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Aaand I found the remains of fencing that will have to be excavated and removed before we can go any further.

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Sounds exciting.....as a future potential.  Currently tho, it sounds like a LOT of work! 

 

MtRider  ....good luck with the wild things! 

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