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Mt_Rider

Urban Survival Course by Selco

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Very interesting.

 

 My big BOB, for the monthly trips, is a backpack, that’s designed to put most of the weight on the hips 

1 overall flight suit; multiple pockets

2 pair of socks & underwear 

stocking & baseball caps

sunscreen

multi-tool, sharp pocket knife, small whet stone

space blanket

a few MRE’s 

life straw

fork & spoon

ziplock with sugar, salt, pepper, & coffee packets, hand sanitizer, and single packed wet wipes. 

small plastic comb (great for removing cactus)

small LED flashlight, larger LED w/extra batteries 

bic lighters, in case one gets wet, a couple books of matches

Lightweight windbreaker jacket w/removable fleece liner

bandana

ziplock w/1st aid;  (I use a mechanical pencil lead refill container to store needles in) We’ve managed to miniaturized most of it, for the sake of weight. 

10x monocular 

a military compass 

2 bungee cords to attach the 1 person tent - 

https://www.survivalfrog.com/products/solo-1-person-backpacking-tent?a=1?variant=38676789313&gclid=EAIaIQobChMI14OOp72S3gIVQdbACh3-lwPPEAQYCCABEgLXhvD_BwE

a lightweight blanket & lightweight 0* sleeping bag 

 

1 pair of military hiking boots, adjustable walking stick. A long range & short range person protection items with refills. 

 

That’s just the very basic list of what’s in it. We’ve added a few other comforts, I can’t recall, at this moment. The total weight, including the tent is about 20 lbs. 

 

I always carry several gallons of water, in juice bottles. Worst case, I would use the rope in the car, to hang a gallon or two on my belt, putting all the weight on my hips. 

 

If, I’m stranded somewhere between my destinations, due to SHTF, I’d hike towards the closest destination. Being female, I would get out of sight, as best as I could. Including, disguising myself to look like a transient. We’ve discussed several scenarios, where getting home would be the only option, instead of heading back to the big city. 

 

Yes, it would take months to walk 400 miles and would challenge every survival skill I have. 

 

Around home, we don’t go out that much. I carry a mini-BOB in my purse, and a medium one always stays in the car. Enough to sustain 2 people 3-5 days. 

 

 

 

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19 hours ago, Ambergris said:

Actually, I do like the trick candles--the ones that keep relighting themselves after they're blown out.  Think of the wind blowing those out.

 

:gaah:   There goes my MS....twisting things backwards again.  Yesssss....the trick candles stay lit better.  {MS-brain somehow had them going out no matter how you tried to light them.....grumble, mumble....exactly backwards! } <_< 

 

As for the pine tree inner core used as a water filter, that's a handy new one for me.  LOTS of pine trees around here.  They specify E.coli ...bacteria.  So not virus.  But way better than a used sock.  4 liters/day.  Thanks!     ...I'll see if my brain will store that data right-side-up.  Hmph!

 

MtRider   ...Putting trick candles on my shopping list.... :rolleyes:   Had some for that purpose long ago...  Also want 2 Sawyer mini filters!

Edited by Mt_Rider
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Annarchy....like the shelter/tent...in dull green.  Question:  is there any difference between a "spotting scope" and a "monocular"?  I just happened upon mine at a garage sale.  Range of vision is quite narrow.  Tested it watching a fox one day.  I could see it with plain vision...then try to find it with the scope.  Takes practice to note landmarks.  Then...you can count the whiskers if it's not far. 

 

Would you travel parallel to roads then?  Not on the road....being female alone?  That is a serious consideration.  Have make-up to create chin-stubble?  Look like a crazy old coot?  Lots of potential for subterfuge.  Unless DH died in accident....I do not drive so would not be alone.  Makes some things more possible.  Hopefully that includes making some time on the highways/roads with wheeled devices tied to the back of my belt.  And TWO canes [sticks, ski poles, snake-pokers, whatever] for bi-lateral motion.  But....no small wheels off-road.

 

MtRider  ... ya got high snake boots?  :unsure:

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Menopause gave me a beard, but a shaver keeps it down too much to help, especially since nature gave me a lot of curves.

 

You know what I just remembered?  Cigarettes.  They are designed to light very easily, to burn very evenly, and to go out only if stubbed out.  Also make outstanding barter material, I bet, if they aren't two years old by then.  Or maybe old nicotine is better than none to the addict?  Don't know.  Does anyone know a smoker who might have tried a two year old cigarette?

 

Annarchy, have you seen these?  They run a buck or two apiece. They say they will hold a two-liter bottle, but those keep bouncing on my hips and falling.  Image result for bottle holder clips

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Oh Ambergris, those are awesome, too bad they fall. DH likes the Ocean Spray Juice 101.4 fl. Oz. Bottles, they have a handle. They are a little heavy, but with proper water management, a bottle can last for a while. 

 

Definately, Mt_Rider, parallel to the road, but at a distance. Far enough to not be seen, but, I could still use the road as a landmark. 

 

Absolutely no makeup. Hair tied with a rubber band, earrings removed, baseball cap and sunglasses, loose clothing to disguise my curves. :ph34r: 

 

 Monocular is single vision with a wide view, while a spotting scopes view is rather narrow. My eyes don’t like binoculars, I always close one eye anyway. Desert military boots provide substantial protection for snakes, scorpions, cactus, and the like. Plus, wearing the flight suit adds another layer of protection. 

 

If, it’s that bad and I really have to walk.... my plan is to walk away from the road, as far as I can and still be able to see it. Most predators won’t be looking out in the wilderness/desert for prey. And then, to head for my destination. Make it as far as I can and stop and rest, gather my perspective and priorities. Survey my surroundings for a suitable place to rest. Then, continue on, keeping in mind, fresh supplies are always going to be better then breaking into the MRE’s. 

 

My my tent is grayish white & black,  quite muted, an old one from way back when, but in pristine condition. A little creative camouflage, and it wouldn’t be seen. 

 

Oh, definitely, Ambergris, cigarettes make a wonderful fire starter and barter. Lol, we actually have 20 year old cigs in the freezer, however, keep in mind about 10 years ago, the powers that be, required all cigs to have a chemical added to them to make them go out if they are not being smoked, so... if you look closely, there are three shinny rings on the cigs that will extinguish it. Near the end, one in the center and one near the filter. It was supposed to eliminate the fires caused by people putting it in the ashtray and forgetting about them.

 

Mt_Rider, have you seen these.  https://www.hurrycane.com/pages/hurryroll. Something that intrigued me as a multi purpose helper. 

 

 

 

 

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For those of us that have canes, remember that the metal ones can hold an awful lot of properly packed items.  I made up a mini-bob for a talk I did to a prep group back when I lived hear one.  The downside is that the items could be a little hard to get out (we swung that cane and they flew) but that would not necessarily be as bad a not having those things in the first place.  I packed most items in small bundles wrapped in plastic bags, or in cleaned out chapstick tubes,  Now knowing how to seal plastic drinking straws to make mini tubes I could store lots more "wet' items - ointments, liquids, etc, and it would  be far easier to retrieve things (matches, for example) packed in those firm plastic straws than those bundled up in plastic bags.

 

The mini-bob in the cane was an intriguing idea, though the cane would rattle a bit when being used (LOL) and would have a different balance/feel you would have to get used to.

I did not try stuffing the tubular parts of my walker...it looked like I would need tools to access items, and I was working on the concept of a no-tools-on-hand scenario, as if traveling somewhere.  Those little squeeze flashlights, if they have the optional permanent on switch are cheap and handy....I buy them by the bag full and strategically place them all over the place.  Power outages are very common here in the back woods.

 

 

Those larger juice bottles with handles are our choice for buying all juices now, we find SOOOO many ways to re-use them, mostly for potable water.  The handles make carrying and pouring SO much easier with our arthritic hands.  worth a few pennies extra when buying juices. 

 

I never throw out altoids tins (or prescription pill bottles) and yes I finally did figure out how to "stuff" a paracord bracelet to make a mini-bob.  I'm far more likely to have a mini-bob around than a bugout bag now days.  Plus my sidearm, in these days of hostile/threatening/dangerous flash-mobs.

Edited by kappydell
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13 hours ago, Annarchy said:

Mt_Rider, have you seen these.  https://www.hurrycane.com/pages/hurryroll. Something that intrigued me as a multi purpose helper. 

 

I like it!  I have a wheelchair that is not much more material/hardware than that.  Especially since I rarely use the foot pegs.  Squishes up flat like that too.  I definitely use my chair for a rolling walker...and room for shopping bags, etc on the seat.  I've had it when I'm with my mom at the hospital.  Sometimes I walk with it.  Sometimes I sit and pull the chair with backward drag of my feet.  Works well on smooth surface..not carpet.  When my legs get tired, I use my arms ....as is normal locomotion of self-propelled wheelchairs.  But both my arms and legs fatigue easily so I switch off.  Then I might stand up and walk again with chair as support.  It doesn't have handbrakes.....something I have to keep in mind on hills.

23015.jpg

 

This is a MUCH newer version of mine but they kept the same basic design I'm used to.  I NEED to get a new one.  I just plain wore out the one I got nearly 30 yrs ago.  On the day my mom went into the ER, my family in the waiting room was trying to get the tires pumped up.  [they lose air].  My niece remembered playing with it when she was 10 ...eighteen yrs ago... and flipping over backwards on it at her house.  She was trying for a "wheelie" of course.  lol 

 

I bookmarked that site, Annarchy.  Looks quite sturdy.  I could see either of my folks using a walker like that....some day. 

 

MtRider  ....now I'm eyeing that new wheelchair!!  Would need to 'test drive' since I'm not really a 'sedate' driver.  :whistling: 

Edited by Mt_Rider
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:bounce:  Oh Kappy, thank you for bringing up the BOB-In-Cane.  I use the shock-corded 'stick' canes but I'd bet I could slip some STUFF inside. I'd heard of this and completely forgotten to act on it.  Me and my propensity to stick stuff all over for point-of-use!  And my seat cane.....easy to remove the rubber tips... 

 

Of course one has to remember to REMOVE things before going thru airport or govt bldg security systems....  :o

 

Hmmm.....a wonderful new project to think upon!  I've got a folder knife....and liter, of course...  Have to check diameter....  Some energy drink powder for real emergencies...

 

MtRider  :sSig_thankyou:

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Also Annarchy....thanks for the distinction between monocular [wider vision] and spotting scope.  I'd suspected that.  The monocular would be a much better choice...so I'll keep my eye out for one.  Meanwhile, a scope in the hand ....is worth what it can allow me to see.

 

MtRider :pc_coffee:

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I keep a 2nd cane - solid wood - in the car for the courthouse and other metal-detector places.  That way I can take it thru the metal detector.  Needless to say that one isn't "bobbed".  Not even a little lead in the bottom for whacking varmints with.  Just...plain...wood.  Its my 'sneaker" cane - it does not rattle like the metal ones do.

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...courthouse cane not 'bobbed'.....   :laughkick: 

 

I'l keep that in mind.

MtRider  :lol: 

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Here's a post from someone I don't know:  

There are areas here, like Mexico Beach, that are literally destroyed. The damage is unfathomable and short of a nuclear weapon, we couldn’t cause that much damage on purpose with military weaponry and bombing.

The old “we will rebuild” saying doesn’t really apply here. Imagine if your entire town was wiped out; your home, your place of work, your child’s school, the places you shopped, the places you liked to eat, the things you saw everyday.....all gone. You can rebuild structures, but it’s not the same places or memories.

The people here are suffering greatly; they are shell shocked, lost, depressed, scared and uncertain about their future. I’ve seen the thousand yard stares, the walking wounded and those trying to make the best of things. Everyone here is just trying to get through to the next day.

The conditions for the people here are absolutely abysmal and even the mostly unscathed are having to adjust to this harsh existence.

The ER’s and hospitals are choked with the injured and more keep coming. Fire and EMS are scarce as they are heavily tasked with rescue and recovery operations. When people get hurt their options are limited and we’ve had to bandage people up the best we can and give them medical supplies and medications that we brought for ourselves.

Many if the roads are unpassable or treacherous to drive on. There are downed trees, downed power lines that are especially hard to see at night, and debris is everywhere. If the car punctures a tire or beaks down, there is no way to fix it yet. The local police cars here are all damaged. There are abandoned broken cars everywhere, with many just left in the street.

Almost none of the roads here have working street lights, many don’t have working traffic signals and few have intact street signs or stop signs. There are dead animals all over the roads; dogs, cats and wildlife. There are numerous crashes happening.

There is a strict curfew from 7 PM to 7 AM  so that looting can be controlled. Also, it’s too dangerous to drive at night. Anyone caught out without a legitimate purpose has been stopped, detained and searched. Many critical sites and businesses are being guarded by either police or assault rifle-armed private security. Some small business owners are parking at their buildings at night.

The power situation is uneven and sporadic. There are power workers from almost every state here working around the clock. The lines, poles, junctions and transformers all have to be replaced and repaired. A lot of areas are dark and the sound of generators is everywhere.

The water situation is bad, and even in areas with running water, it’s not safe to drink yet. There’s open sewage in many places and in some places there have been sewage rivers.

The stores, businesses and restaurants that weren’t damaged aren’t open or are open for limited times. Pharmacies are open for a few hours and the only restaurants open are the non-destroyed Waffle Houses.  The banks are closed. There are no non-essential stores open and many businesses that are intact, don’t have employees to man them.

Cell service is spotty and limited. There are mobile emergency hot spots set up all over, but those get overwhelmed. There’s no cable service available at this time, news is hard to get out.

Tens of thousands of trees were felled, damaged or splintered and wood piles cover every corner, sidewalk and road shoulder. There's smoke everywhere from people trying to burn the wood for light and to cook on.

Food is hard to find, and if the people didn’t have canned or preserved food items they have to come to the feeding sites for hot meals and to get MRE’s to bring home. Pet food is even harder to find.

Gasoline is scarce due to most the gas stations being damaged or wrecked. There are mobile fueling sites for first responders, but all the open gas stations have miles long lines and the gas is rationed.

There is no mail service, and there’s almost no mailboxes to put mail in anyway. There’s no home deliveries from UPS, FedEx, Amazon...nothing.

There’s no residential garbage pickup and the spoiled food and human waste people have put in bags is piling up.

I think this is all I can write about for now. There’s so much to tell and so many thoughts, sights and emotions to process. I hope this post goes through.

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Thanks for posting that person's attempt to inform us, Ambergris.

 

You know....it seems like it might be easier for ones that got completely wiped out.  They could chose to stay elsewhere for ....a long time.  Get temporary work.  Temporary housing.  Just stay away until the initial clearing of wreckage has been done....and utilities restored.  Months...or more?  :(  Those that actually have something left...don't have much choice.  They have to be there to guard it...begin to restore what they can.  Months... or more.  Even if they had preps...do they still have them now?  Do they dare USE things like generators?  Share with neighbors?  What kind of neighbors?  People not from their neighborhood? 

 

This isn't a new story in this world.  But we in U.S. rarely have this level of damage here.  Places in areas of the world that have poorly constructed buildings and spotty utilities can be damaged like this with lesser storms.  Or earthquakes.  I'm thanking God again that H. Lane did not hit Hawaii as Cat 5 or 4 or even 3. 

 

That collective SHOCK of whole communities.... I know that one.  You can hear it in that narrative above...as that person tries to put something so very HUGE AND UNFAMILIAR....into mere words.  Our community had that after our mega-wildfire.  Had to be extra careful driving on the roads. Trying to make simple choices.  Even those of us who had no damage were kinda......spacey.  But that word is very much too weak.  Like your brain needed a reboot badly.  An older neighbor confided to me that she couldn't get her mind to work right.  She feared it was sudden onset of Alzheimer's.  No....we're all like that to greater and lesser degrees, friend.  It will pass but while we're all like this:  Be Extra Careful! 

 

Our rural damage was not like this.  Our towns were saved by firefighters efforts.  We mostly still had utilities when finally allowed back in.  Massive amount of homes/properties...and especially forests... were turned to ash.  'Moonscape' they called it.  Sterilized.  But most of our huge area still survived.  Many lived in the ashes in homes that were saved by the firefighters.  That's a strange reality.  Quiet.  Black and Grey everywhere around.  Nothing but your house is familiar.  A half-melted lawn chair over there.  A child's toy laying unharmed ten feet from the house.  Surrounded by burned stumps of former trees... or merely ash.  Those folks didn't have utilities for a long time....the power poles all burned.  They were thankful for their houses and contents but .... :scratchhead:  where ARE we?  Nothing is familiar.

 

Still....this hurricane damage is worse than it was for me....for our community.  Much worse because the towns are gone.  So it's hard to imagine the level of SHOCK these folks are locked into.  :pray: 

 

......and this level of damage would be common in war.  A damage that goes on and on for weeks...months...years.  This is the level of difficulty that Selco tries to convey to those of us who have never seen the destruction of war.  Experiencing community shock is .....HUGE.  I doubt that I can realistically imagine a whole country....or all of Europe at war.  I'm not sure I have the courage to want to imagine it. 

 

MtRider  :pray:

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They've had at least one man knifed when he tried to stop a group from looting an elderly neighbor's home (while she was home).  In war, the first responders would not be pouring in from every state of the Union, plus Canada and Puerto Rico.  The Cajun Navy would be home guarding its own.  The people arrested after curfew would not be searched and released.  And I don't think there would be donated toys, school supplies, and cleaning supplies coming in to the shelters.

Edited by Ambergris

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Puerto Rico?  Good for them!  But that is a sobering thot....no one comes during war.  Or if the damage is so widespread that supply lines/roads cannot be established. 

 

MtRider :pray: 

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Ambergris, you got me thinking.... First & foremost, they were warned that the storm was coming. I know that sounds cold blooded, sorry. I do understand some people may not have known. There’s the sadness. 

 

A major catastrophe, like hurricanes, war, etc., in a very short time, no help is available. Every thing is gone. How do you prepare for that?  

 

Honestly, I couldn’t live in a threatened area. Heat is one thing, but that... it blows my mind how anyone survives. 

 

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That's something I have often thought about; i can be prepared to the hilt but one tornado and I'd be wiped out. It really hit home after Katrina. Not much you can do about a tornado. They happen so fast and are erratic. 

 

I know of a family who just had their house burn down last month. It was an older house and they are in their 50-60's. They had insurance but not nearly enough to rebuild. Red Cross gave them each $100.00 to buy personal items. Luckily, they are able to stay with some of their kids..for awhile. The kicker is it will cost them over $20,000.00 just to have the remaining structure cleared away. That was a shock they hadn't considered. 

 

I get what you are saying too Mt.Rider. It's similar to medicare. Those that never worked get medicade with everything paid for while other folks who worked their rear end off for decades get medicare where everything is limited. I'm not talking about truly disabled people either! It was a good idea at the time but too many able body people learned to work the system.

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