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Mt_Rider

RURR for summer HEAT?

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https://www.theorganicprepper.com/it-might-be-scarier-than-we-think-hard-lessons-learned-in-a-reality-check/

 

I don't know about calling it "muscle memory"....unless the brain is a "muscle".  But we do make certain brain pathways automatic.  That can have good or bad ramifications.  The term: Normalcy Bias is a bad ramification.  Knowing automatically how to solve an issue is a good ramification. 

 

I could have written this article.....from the perspective of hundreds of scenarios and locations of overheating.  Except for not having water with me.  The funny part is, on the trip to the Midwest with my life-long friend, KJ.....I did overheat at a fort.  It wasn't in FL but it was a wooden one.  Not cool at all and I was darting from building to building, trying to keep out of the sun ....even "just"  twenty feed of sun, as in the article.  Trying to keep my core temp under my heat threshold ...and I was running it so close to the limit.  :knary:  

 

But KJ had already experienced caring for me during one of my BIG meltdown a few days earlier.  In the middle of a huge asphalt parking lot.....94* and HUMID.  Tho I TRIED to prep her, she did not know how bad it looks....how helpless I get.  But as an RN it only took her 20 seconds of literally running back and forth, trying to do two things at once, before she settled into her role.  From there I was too helpless to help myself.  I gave only one more direction:  Slushy drink!  :bev:  ....since we'd parked under a McD's sign.  Or I would not have remembered that very fine tip.  Too far gone.  But quick action brought me out fairly rapidly.  

 

Quoting article:  " was now starting to shiver. My body temperature was now hotter than the air around me. "  :scratchhead:   Still thinking on that analysis.  Is that right?  Or is it shock?  People in desert conditions do not shiver....Annarchy?   Hmmm....   I do get the shivers and feel like I'm cold....on my extremities.  It's ok to warm up fingers and toes to equalize.  Improves circulation.  But everything else must be iced to the point of awful discomfort.  These episodes are DREADFUL  .....and DANGEROUS!  

 

Anyway, this overheating problem is brought on by MS for me.  But other medical conditions and/or medications can make one more heat-sensitive risk too.  And aging makes our bodies less capable of adapting to our environments.  :knary:  :frozen:  etc.  

 

MtRider  ....enjoy summer but keep your preparedness up to speed and adapted for your immediate situation:grouphug:

 

 

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8 hours ago, Mt_Rider said:

People in desert conditions do not shiver....Annarchy?

 

:scratchhead:  I think I got that backwards.  Still trying to figure that one. 

 

MtRider  :wacko: 

 

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12 hours ago, Mt_Rider said:

 

:scratchhead:  I think I got that backwards.  Still trying to figure that one. 

 

MtRider  :wacko: 

 

 

Might have been shock, the first thing that came to mind, after reading they shared a warm juice, it may be possible, that she needed sugar/salt/electrolytes. Expending energy in warm temperatures can cause those types of reactions. After they shared the drink, I noticed, in her story, that her basic demeanor was more cognitive, but, exhibiting classic heat exhaustion symptoms. 

 

I have found it necessary to acclimate to the extreme temperature changes of AC and outdoors.

 

Whenever I am working out in the heat, I try to drink tepid water, take breaks when I notice I’m sweating a lot, and rest in the shade. Rushing into the AC cooled house, has caused my system to cool too quickly and makes it very difficult to go back outside. The times I have cooled too much, just stepping outside, is like opening an hot oven and being blasted with the heat. 

 

Muscle memory, maybe. I was born here in the desert. Old time farmers always recommend to me, to drink hot drinks before heading out to do the daily chores and to start early, to give your body a chance to acclimate. Pondering the story, for me, it is ‘like making something from scratch without a recipe’, because I have done it so many times. I don’t think about it, I just do it ‘naturally’.

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Yeah....I just think Muscle Memory is specific to the muscles in our body.  Like typing on keyboard.  Playing piano.  Dialing a phone # we know so well.  Tying a shoe.  Dance or martial arts movement.  It's the things we do that will get scrambled if we stop and try to do them "on manual"....thinking about them.  It's things that if they were not in muscle memory, we could not do them smoothly.   :scratchhead:  It's what differentiates between very skilled sports players or anything else....and those who have not developed something into that level.

 

But definitely we have brain pathways that are automatic too.  I automatically reach for keys, DL, SAK, water bottle, gel/ice packs, and canes before heading for the car.  It's as automatic as putting on footwear....and grabbing a jacket for our variable weather here.  It's certainly a survival habit I've consciously developed to the point of being automatic.  But we can get distracted. 

 

For this person, I think that being in a totally new location was her distraction.  Like:  the old routines aren't there and some of the triggers to "bring this" are missing.  Walking out YOUR OWN front door is a much better trigger than walking out of a hotel room.  Things might be in slightly different locations or whatnot.  That's enough to throw us off our game.  For me being in a different vehicle means I have to find a place for all my STUFF.  Recently traveled a short time with my cousin....crammed into their car....but I did bring my stuff.  Didn't need my heat stuff cuz it was drizzling/raining/cool.  :)  

 

I was wondering about shock too.  More specifically, I wonder how much shock I might be having during a heat emergency.  My toes, nose, fingers always go icy during the bad episodes.  Blood drawing into the core?  Or MS spasms preventing good circulation to extremities?  :scratchhead: 

 

This woman was definitely into the realm of heat stroke.  She described being dry [no sweat] and very red in face.  Those are signs of eminent danger.  My face does get red too.  In the arid west, sweat evaporates so quickly, it's hard to tell on that clue.  With MS, I am much more likely to be going into heat stroke than merely heat exhaustion.  But I'm trying to figure out the shivers and shock ....  By the time I'm at that point, I've lost at least half of my ability to think clearly....let alone walk or grasp things. 

 

I totally agree with not shocking the system with cold drinks and A/C.  I always drink tepid to mildly cool drinks.  I prefer them.  Merely keeping FULLY hydrated [especially in our arid West]  will allow the body to handle the heat, usually. 

 

But the one exception I make for icy drinks and deep chill is when I know I'm going into heat stroke.  I hate icy drinks and abhor slushies.  They taste like antifreeze smells.  :yuk:   But I treat that like medicine during a heat stoke episode.  It does cool the insides quickly.  Ice packs at sides of neck [arteries], arm pits, groin......I place on chest and top of head too.  Anything to stop the heating process and get it reversing. 

 

I do love malts and shakes but they do not have the same ICY coldness that a slushy has.  A slushy seems to go right to the brain especially since I suck them down as fast as I can tolerate.   But they bring me out fast.  And they are usually available in summer, close by at C-stores/fast food, or even the zoo, amusement parks, etc.  [ask me how I know]  :buttercup: 

 

Our property manager introduced me to another hydration drink when I had a meltdown right in front of her.  J keeps it handy for B when they go out on jobs and had one in their vehicle.  Few years ago, B had gone into the hospital when he collapsed with heat issues.  It's got lime and possibly lemon.  Himalayan pink salt.  And lots of ice chips.  She had me slugging down B's drink before B was able to get DH's attention to come up from the barnyard.  It did help.  Unfortunately, neither of us can remember her whole formula.  But I'm sure an electrolyte drink like Gatorade would be similar.  Salts, sugars, etc. 

 

Annarchy, [or anyone else] do you have an electrolyte drink you prefer?  I've actually never tried Gatorade but have been meaning to.  I've had "Gatorade powder" on my First Aid Kit list to purchase.  We have the pink salt and Hawaiian sea salts. 

 

MtRider  ....  :buttercup:  Maui will be fun .....  :knary:  :faint3: 

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I mix my own powdered electrolytes to carry with me.  I use one packet of True Lemon, one of True Lime (though just the lemon is fine), eight teaspoons of sugar (not artificial substitutes as they can be dehydrating), and 3/4 teaspoon of Himilayian pink sea salt, or a bit more.  Stir together well.  I put 1 or 1 1/2 teaspoon in clean dry 16-20 ounce bottles. Add water when needed and shake to mix.  Or do as I do, carry bottles of mineral water with me to mix it in and just make up little packets of the premeasured powder. 

 

You really only need the salt water but the True Lemon/lime gives it a bit of taste.  You can, if you don't mind artificial colors and flavors, use non sugared  Koolaid . But not artificially sweetened.  The sugar (I use beet sugar as I'm allergic to cane sugar) helps move the salt into the intestinal walls to be absorbed faster. 

 

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Mother, have you tried adding a quarter teaspoon of potassium chloride added to this?  It's used in baby electrolyte solutions.

 

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I haven't but I have used salt substitutes in the formula, which is potassium chloride, when I was using a similar recipe with dehydrated wildlife.  I don't care for it.  Let me know if it works for you. 

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 Mother, that sounds like J/B's recipe.   I wasn't sure if there was anything else...sugar.  Sounds right.

 

 

I started looking up the minerals.  How important are these when dealing with heat exhaustion or heat stroke?

 

=-=-==-=-

A high potassium intake reduces the risk of overall mortality by 20 percent. It also decreases the risk of stroke, lowers blood pressure, protects against loss of muscle mass, preserves bone mineral density, and reduces the formation of kidney stones

=-=-=-=-=

Other trace minerals can be found in differing salts as one study examined and results are provided below:
  •                     Sodium        Potassium        Magnesium       Iron.
  • Table Salt   39.1%               0.09%               <0.01%          <0.01%
  • Sea Salt      38.3%               0.08%                   0.05%         <0.01%
  • Himalayan  36.8%               0.28%                   0.1%             0.0004%
  • Celtic Sea   33.8%               0.16%                    0.3%            0.014%

https://www.verywellfit.com/what-kind-of-salt-is-healthiest-4157937

=-=-==-=-=-=
 
MtRider  :bev: 

 

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I believe it's important to remember that sometimes just plain water is appropriate for dehydration.  Unless one has been sweating profusely and is actually low in sodium drinking salt water might not be necessary.  And too much salt can react adversely.  That's why rehydrating formulas seem especially low in salt.  Less than a teaspoon is good for a quart of water. It's better to have more dilution and drink more water.  

 

If available, broth works pretty well too. 

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My grandfather & mom always carried salt tabs. I do not remember what they were called, but I remember them telling me it contained potassium chloride. 

 

We use powdered Gatorade when necessary. Mostly, we keep hydrated and bring water with us everywhere we go. 

 

Mom used to say, if the Gatorade tasted sweet, you probably didn’t need it, if it tasted sour, you probably did.  :shrug:

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8 hours ago, Annarchy said:

Mom used to say, if the Gatorade tasted sweet, you probably didn’t need it, if it tasted sour, you probably did.  :shrug:

 

Hmm...that's interesting.  Unfortunate if true tho.  Since if it tastes sour, folks would be less inclined to chug it down.  Everyone likes SWEET these days. 

 

I do wonder if I get enough water.....tho it seems like I'm constantly drinking.  I have water bottles/glasses all over the house....car.....down in basement.....  So it's hard to calculate how much I drink.  :shrug: 

 

MtRider  :bev:  ....I'm at the point of warm weather when I crave potato chips.  Happens in summer only.  Salt.

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I crave potato chips when I get a migrain. They have to be plain old white Lays. :shrug:

 

I made up some packets of the homemade powdered solution with some Tang and some with Crystal Lite for emergencies. Then I put them in an airtight container. Every single one of them drew moisture from some place. I think I'll make up some more with some Gatorade and vacuum seal them in a jar. I like the blue Gatorade.

 

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We don’t seal the Gatorade. Yet, we’ve used it 10 years beyond its ‘suggested’ expiration date, & it has provided the desired results, every time. Yeah, my stock is a little overboard. Lol

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15 hours ago, Jeepers said:

They have to be plain old white Lays

 

Exactly what I crave. Lays Classic.  Not BBQ or Sour Cream or.....  :grinning-smiley-044:    I actually might enjoy those flavors for an occasional snack but I do not crave them at all.  Do NOT like the kettle cooked ones....or what ever those crunchy, half-burned ones are called.  :yuk: 

 

Sometimes I will put one little bit of chunk of the Hawaiian or Himalayan salt in my mouth.  Have to watch salty stuff like the chips or the little chunk cuz it can give me a mouth sore. 

 

MtRider  .....need to address this with Gatorade or something...to be on hand.  :bev: 

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My grandson thinks those little bottles of Gatorade is 'pop'. If he's hot and sweaty from mowing my grass he asks for a pop. Mom gets him a bottle of Gatorade. He thinks he's chugging a Pepsi. I'm a sneaky gramdma.   :grinning-smiley-044:

 

I made up the little individual packs so I could use them when out and about. Just the correct amount for a bottle of water.  Fail. 

 

Speaking of salt, my blood pressure is so wonkie I really have to watch it. But that's another issue.  Should we, as a society, be concerned with all of the popular 'designer' salts because of lack of iodine? The colored salts are pretty and fun to grind but do they provide iodine? One word...goiter. :shrug:

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Good point about iodine.  Chew on some 'kim'?  .....Korean word for dried seaweed that one uses for sushi or other Asian things.  What other sources of iodine do we have?  And how much do we need? 

 

MtRider 

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I’ve always bought Morton Iodine salt.  Mom always bought it too, as far back as I can remember. She advised us that it was good for us. :shrug:

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