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Schoolmarm

Water?

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A plastic sheet *vent* off the roof to collectors (trashbags, buckets etc.).

Rainbarrow.

There's a digging trick which uses saran wrap and a stone to gather condensation. Can be used in a garden.

 

I have a years worth of water filters for a pitcher.

I have plans for sand/gravel/charcoal filters.

I have pellet water purifiers which can be bought in any camping area. I've even bought them in walmart.

I have a book that details certain plants that tell you at what depth water can be found.

 

your not going to go make me find these websites again are you? LOL

I have bleach to do the teaspoon cleaning.

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A plastic sheet *vent* off the roof to collectors (trashbags, buckets etc.).
Rainbarrow.
There's a digging trick which uses saran wrap and a stone to gather condensation. Can be used in a garden.

I have a years worth of water filters for a pitcher.
I have plans for sand/gravel/charcoal filters.
I have pellet water purifiers which can be bought in any camping area. I've even bought them in walmart.
I have a book that details certain plants that tell you at what depth water can be found.

your not going to go make me find these websites again are you? LOL
I have bleach to do the teaspoon cleaning.




Rox

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*snark!*

LMAO!!!

It was a drive-by guilting!

 

Here's one, desert water. It's condensation and dew traps.

 

http://www.death-valley.us/article245.html

 

Basic hommade filtration devices including one to combat radiation in the water:

 

http://www.baproducts.com/rainwatr.htm

 

http://www.parowanprophet.com/Nuclear_War_...nstructions.htm

 

Pond filters in case of need for catfishing in the back yard?

cookie

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*snark!*
LMAO!!!
It was a drive-by guilting!

Here's one, desert water. It's condensation and dew traps.

http://www.death-valley.us/article245.html

Basic hommade filtration devices including one to combat radiation in the water:

http://www.baproducts.com/rainwatr.htm

http://www.parowanprophet.com/Nuclear_War_...nstructions.htm

Pond filters in case of need for catfishing in the back yard?

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We're on a roll...LOL

Ohhnoooooooo you've created a monster.

 

Rain devices for sale for my gardeners-some I think you could figure out how to make? Plus rain gardens that control runoff in urban settings:

 

http://www.gardeners.com/Watering/Default/...cat?SC=xnet8019

 

http://www.raingardennetwork.com/

 

Rain Harvesting using other country's techniques:

 

http://www.tn.gov.in/dtp/rainwater.htm

 

http://akash-ganga-rwh.com/RWH/WaterHarvesting.html

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We're on a roll...LOL
Ohhnoooooooo you've created a monster.

Rain devices for sale for my gardeners-some I think you could figure out how to make? Plus rain gardens that control runoff in urban settings:

http://www.gardeners.com/Watering/Default/...cat?SC=xnet8019

http://www.raingardennetwork.com/

Rain Harvesting using other country's techniques:

http://www.tn.gov.in/dtp/rainwater.htm

http://akash-ganga-rwh.com/RWH/WaterHarvesting.html


Go Cookie!

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I'm not urban but still not clear *nor is my pond water* on using the powdered swimming pool chlorine for treatment. Have read somewhere it has better shelf life than regular bottled liquid bleach.

 

Keeping eye out at WM for it to go on clearance sale now that season is almost over. There is "shock" stuff, "algae" stuff and other stuff. What is right kind to buy? Anybody know?

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here is standard bleach amounts for purification:

 

http://www.local10.com/hurricanes/1040678/detail.html

 

I don't know if the dry clorine mentioned here is what your looking for Granny. This includes boiling procedures, iodine and other purifications. Hope this helps:

 

http://standeyo.com/News_Files/LTAH_Water_Pure2.html

 

Okay,

I seriously need to cut down on sugar...LOL

 

 

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We have 12.5 gallons of store-bought water (five 2.5gal jugs).

 

A rain barrel attached to the shed.

 

A 'rain barrel' filled with hose water - refreshed every 3-6 months.

 

There is a natural spring about 2.5 miles away. I fill up household drinking water there about once a week (because I believe it to be healthier than city tap water). If TSHTF right after I filled up, we'd have another nine gallons of fresh water on hand.

 

Once those resources were used up & assuming we couldn't get to the spring, we could continue to collect rain water and use our propane stove to purify.

 

We've already determined that we would not use ANY water for flushing. Instead we would use a bucket and hand-carry it to the septic. That saves a lot. As does a no-rinse skin cleanser like Cetaphil for bathing, and purell for hand-washing.

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Cisterns (including buckets under downspouts) are illegal in Colorado. WE have planned, for when we get land, to bury a system of cisterns and then funnel the downspouts to them. We'd still have to filter the water, as the pvc to funnel the water will have to be at ground level, but it's better than nothing.

 

In our present home, we have only store bought water, and limited storage space at that. This is one of my primary concerns.

 

Mo7

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Many big tanks here are underground. Think Swimming pool with a lid!

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Cookie. Since I have 1,000 gallon stainless steel milk tank, it looks like about 1 oz at first, then 1/4 oz per week. Does that sound right?

 

The tank is covered so might not have chlorine burn off like swimming pools do ...wonder if that makes a difference?

 

(The site said this) DRY CHLORINE - also called calcium hypochlorite has the added benefit of extended shelf life. Providing it is kept dry, cool and in an airtight container, it may be stored up to 10 years with minimal degradation. If one is wanting to keep chlorine in larger quantities, this is the item to store as it is readily available at swimming pool supply stores and many hardware and grocery stores carrying pool items and requires less actual storing space than its liquid counterpart.

 

For chlorinating water in rain tanks, Western Australia Health Dept. regulations state for first time chlorination, add 7 grams dry (1/4 ounce by weight) or 40ml (1.35 ounces) liquid per 1000 liters (264 gallons) and let stand for 24 hours before drinking. To maintain adequate chlorination, on a weekly basis add 1 gram dry (.035 ounce by weight) or 4ml (.135 ounces) liquid per 1000 liters (264 gallons) of water. Let stand for two hours before drinking."

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Okay,

I'm back about water again.

Quite a while ago HSMom mentioned a natural spring near her homestead.

 

When I researched it for Florida, I got the major spring listings (a huge amount for here)

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Ummm here's a homemade water filter, I remember someone else posted this a while ago but here it is again:

 

 

 

Make Your Own Water Filter

 

You can turn muddy water into clear water by putting it through a number of layers that filter out the impurities. this is similar to the first step that our tap water goes through at a treatment station.

 

What You Need:

 

2-Liter plastic pop bottle & lid

Straw

Cotton Batting

Gravel (large and small)

Sand (large grain and fine)

Coffee filter

jar

Muddy Water

 

What To Do:

 

Cut the bottom off the pop bottle. Poke a hole in the bottle's lid, just large enough to fit the straw. Put the straw through the hole. Turn the bottle upside down and rest it in the mouth of the jar.

In the bottle, place a layer of cotton batting followed by layers of fine-grain sand, large-grain sand, small gravel and large gravel. Cut the coffee filter so it fits across the top of the bottle and place it on top of the gravel.

Pour muddy water into the open end of the bottle and let the water seep down through the filter layers.

It is strongly recomended that you still add 4-8 drops of chlorine to every gallon of water filtered just to make sure the water is purified.

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Collecting water

 

Even if you don't find surface water you can sustain yourself in a wilderness survival situation by collecting water from the atmosphere, or from plants or ground stills.

 

 

Rain and dew

 

Rainwater is usually safe for drinking and only needs collecting. If you have a waterproof sheet available, stretch it over a wide area, preferably on a slope, and run the water off into clean containers.

 

You can collect morning dew by soaking a cloth in long, wet grass. When the cloth is soaked wring it out directly into your mouth or a container. Repeat.

 

 

Condensation

 

Tree and plants roots draw moisture from the ground. Use that fact to collect water without digging.

 

Tie a plastic bag over a growing branch with exposure to the sun. Being careful not to puncture the bag. Close the bag. Keep a corner hanging low to collect water. Evaporation from the leaves will produce condensation in the bag. This is an easy way to get pure drinkable water!

 

If you have problem in finding water and you are lucky enough to have a 6 x 6-footsheet (2x2 m) of clear plastic you can create a solar still.

 

 

Water purification

 

In most parts of the world surface water is seldom pure. When finding water always purify suspect water before drinking to avoid parasitic infestation. However water collected from the atmosphere, or from plants or ground stills, has the enormous advantage of always being pure.

 

 

More about how to find water in the wilderness

 

A good tool in finding water is your map. Almost any water source of any size, will be marked on a geodesic map.

 

Clean water is not only crucial for survival it's crucial for life on our planet. Take the opportunity to learn more about the water cycle and the processes and activities between ground water and surface water. Check this great site and find information on many aspects of water. It will also help you finding water on your next wilderness travel.Also! There's a good image of the condensation bag tied to a tree limb for easy water. Try not to laugh, if I get time this week...I'm going to casually hook one up on a tree out front and see how it does. I'll alert you when I'm going to try and take a picture.

 

http://www.wilderness-survival-skills.com/findingwater.html

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I'm waiting for a day I don't work Moonstar, so I can keep an eye on the bags. I want to watch for the rowdy teens in my neighborhood, who might just rip it down for spite. Or the lawn guys who would be trying to be helpful.Though the article doesn't mention how long the condensation process takes, I'm betting on all day to get a trace amount.

I'm even thinking of doing the swipe-the-dew-off-the-lawn emergency water harvesting the article mentioned. The one where you use a cloth and soak up as much dew as possible? Then I'd like to do a measurement with teaspoons or such.

I realize the rest of the country is facing winter weather, but we're still getting dew on the grass in the wee hours of the morn.

 

I just wonder what the association will think I'm doing crawling around with a washcloth on the lawn?

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Be careful you aren't collecting where anyone has used chemical fertilizer/pesticides on a lawn or pasture. While the dew is pure, the top surface of the plant may not be.

 

 

BTW, you might want to take note in your area. Some plants produce a lot more dew than others. I use the sage plants here when I need to wipe off my hands or even clean a nasty duck egg. When ounces count, it's good to know what you'd be looking for...or planting in your yard?

 

I gotta try the bag-in-the-tree. Keep hearing about it recently. Why haven't I heard of this before????

 

MtRider

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Avoid the yellow dew?

 

I've never heard of it before a few years ago...all the sudden it's everywhere.

 

Thanks for the heads up on the pesticide flavor enhancements to dew water.

 

Hopefully, I can get Friday free to become (insert dramatic music here) Clandestine Dew Woman.

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Here's another plant still using the plastic bag idea:

 

STILL CONSTRUCTION

You can use stills in various areas of the world. They draw moisture from the ground and from plant material. You need certain materials to build a still, and you need time to let it collect the water. It takes about 24 hours to get 0.5 to 1 liter of water.

 

Aboveground Still

To make the aboveground still, you need a sunny slope on which to place the still, a clear plastic bag, green leafy vegetation, and a small rock.

 

To make the still--

 

 

Fill the bag with air by turning the opening into the breeze or by "scooping" air into the bag.

 

Fill the plastic bag half to three-fourths full of green leafy vegetation. Be sure to remove all hard sticks or sharp spines that might puncture the bag.

CAUTION

 

Do not use poisonous vegetation. It will provide poisonous liquid.

 

 

 

Place a small rock or similar item in the bag.

 

Close the bag and tie the mouth securely as close to the end of the bag as possible to keep the maximum amount of air space. If you have a piece of tubing, a small straw, or a hollow reed, insert one end in the mouth of the bag before you tie it securely. Then tie off or plug the tubing so that air will not escape. This tubing will allow you to drain out condensed water without untying the bag.

 

Place the bag, mouth downhill, on a slope in full sunlight. Position the mouth of the bag slightly higher than the low point in the bag.

 

Settle the bag in place so that the rock works itself into the low point in the bag.

To get the condensed water from the still, loosen the tie around the bag's mouth and tip the bag so that the water collected around the rock will drain out. Then retie the mouth securely and reposition the still to allow further condensation.

 

Change the vegetation in the bag after extracting most of the water from it. This will ensure maximum output of water.

 

Belowground Still

To make a belowground still, you need a digging tool, a container, a clear plastic sheet, a drinking tube, and a rock.

 

Select a site where you believe the soil will contain moisture (such as a dry stream bed or a low spot where rainwater has collected). The soil at this site should be easy to dig, and sunlight must hit the site most of the day.

 

To construct the still--

 

 

Dig a bowl-shaped hole about 1 meter across and 60 centimeters deep.

 

Dig a sump in the center of the hole. The sump's depth and perimeter will depend on the size of the container that you have to place in it. The bottom of the sump should allow the container to stand upright.

 

Anchor the tubing to the container's bottom by forming a loose overhand knot in the tubing.

 

Place the container upright in the sump.

 

Extend the unanchored end of the tubing up, over, and beyond the lip of the hole.

 

Place the plastic sheet over the hole, covering its edges with soil to hold it in place.

 

Place a rock in the center of the plastic sheet.

 

Lower the plastic sheet into the hole until it is about 40 centimeters below ground level. It now forms an inverted cone with the rock at its apex. Make sure that the cone's apex is directly over your container. Also make sure the plastic cone does not touch the sides of the hole because the earth will absorb the condensed water.

 

Put more soil on the edges of the plastic to hold it securely in place and to prevent the loss of moisture.

 

Plug the tube when not in use so that the moisture will not evaporate.

You can drink water without disturbing the still by using the tube as a straw.

 

You may want to use plants in the hole as a moisture source. If so, dig out additional soil from the sides of the hole to form a slope on which to place the plants. Then proceed as above.

 

If polluted water is your only moisture source, dig a small trough outside the hole about 25 centimeters from the still's lip. Dig the trough about 25 centimeters deep and 8 centimeters wide. Pour the polluted water in the trough. Be sure you do not spill any polluted water around the rim of the hole where the plastic sheet touches the soil. The trough holds the polluted water and the soil filters it as the still draws it. The water then condenses on the plastic and drains into the container. This process works extremely well when your only water source is salt water.

 

You will need at least three stills to meet your individual daily water intake needs.

 

WATER PURIFICATION

Rainwater collected in clean containers or in plants is usually safe for drinking. However, purify water from lakes, ponds, swamps, springs, or streams, especially the water near human settlements or in the tropics.

 

When possible, purify all water you got from vegetation or from the ground by using iodine or chlorine, or by boiling.

 

Purify water by--

 

 

Using water purification tablets. (Follow the directions provided.)

 

Placing 5 drops of 2 percent tincture of iodine in a canteen full of clear water. If the canteen is full of cloudy or cold water, use 10 drops. (Let the canteen of water stand for 30 minutes before drinking.)

 

Boiling water for 1 minute at sea level, adding 1 minute for each additional 300 meters above sea level, or boil for 10 minutes no matter where you are.

By drinking nonpotable water you may contract diseases or swallow organisms that can harm you. Examples of such diseases or organisms are--

 

 

Dysentery. Severe, prolonged diarrhea with bloody stools, fever, and weakness.

 

Cholera and typhoid. You may be susceptible to these diseases regardless of inoculations.

 

Flukes. Stagnant, polluted water--especially in tropical areas--often contains blood flukes. If you swallow flukes, they will bore into the bloodstream, live as parasites, and cause disease.

 

Leeches. If you swallow a leech, it can hook onto the throat passage or inside the nose. It will suck blood, create a wound, and move to another area. Each bleeding wound may become infected.

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Okay,

I need an excuse as to WHY I have bags in my trees! LOL

This is not my tree, but we have association yard folk...what is my excuse?

I've got the camera and NON-rain!!!!

 

condensation.jpg

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