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Schoolmarm

Water?

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Okay, perhaps we all noted I have some water issues bordering on...a syndrome.

 

I've been through 3 boil water situations (weird to learn that's NOT common in the rest of the world).Plus our hurricanes, etc. From high tech filtration systems to low tech charcoal and gravel boxes...it doesn't hurt to know how to treat water for safety.

 

 

Ensuring a healthy water supply

Store at least a two-week supply of water for each member of your family.

 

Store at least 1 gallon of water per person per day. A normally active person needs to drink at least 2 quarts of water each day. Heat can double that amount. Children, nursing mothers and ill people will need more. You will need additional water for food and hygiene.

 

Never ration water. Drink the amount you need today, and try to find more for tomorrow. You can minimize the amount of water your body needs by reducing activity and staying cool.

 

Store water in thoroughly washed plastic, glass, fiberglass or enamel-lined metal containers. Plastic containers such as soft drink bottles are best.

 

Before storing your water, treat it with a disinfectant, such as chlorine bleach, to prevent the growth of microorganisms. Use liquid bleach that contains 5.25 percent sodium hypochlorite and no soap. Some containers warn, "Not For Personal Use." You can disregard these warnings if the label states sodium hypochlorite as the only active ingredient and if you use only the small quantities in these instructions. Add 4 drops of bleach per quart of water (or 2 scant teaspoons per 10 gallons), and stir.

 

Seal your water containers tightly, label them and store them in a cool, dark place.

 

Purifying your water supply

In addition to having a bad odor and taste, contaminated water can contain microorganisms that cause disease such as dysentery, cholera, typhoid and hepatitis. You should purify any water you're uncertain of. There are many ways to purify water, none perfect. Often the best solution is a combination of methods. Before purifying, let any suspended particles settle to the bottom, or strain them through layers of clean cloth.

 

Boiling is the safest method of purifying water.

 

Bring water to a rolling boil for 10 minutes, keeping in mind that some water will evaporate. Let the water cool before drinking.

 

Boiled water will taste better if you put oxygen back into it by pouring it between two containers. This will also improve the taste of stored water.

 

Add a pinch of salt for taste.

 

Chlorination uses liquid chlorine bleach to kill microorganisms.

 

Use liquid bleach that contains 5.25 percent sodium hypochlorite and no soap. Some containers warn "Not For Personal Use." You can disregard these warnings if the label states sodium hypochlorite as the only active ingredient and if you use only the small quantities in these instructions.

 

Add 2 drops of bleach per quart of water (4 drops if the water is cloudy), stir and let stand for 30 minutes. If the water does not taste and smell of chlorine at that point, add another dose and let stand another 15 minutes.

 

If you do not have a dropper, use a spoon and a square-ended strip of paper or thin cloth about 1/4-inch by 2-inches. Put the strip in the spoon with an end hanging down about 1/2 inch below the scoop of the spoon. Place bleach in the spoon and carefully tip it. Drops the size of those from a medicine dropper will drop off the end of the strip.

 

Purification tablets release chlorine or iodine. They are inexpensive and available at most sporting goods stores and some drugstores. Follow the package directions. Usually one tablet is enough for one quart of water. Double the dose for cloudy water.

 

Distillation will remove microbes, heavy metals, salts, most other chemicals.

 

Fill a pot halfway with water, and tie a cup to the handle on the pot's lid so that the cup will hang right-side-up when the lid is upside-down.

 

Put the lid on the pot upside down, making sure the cup is not dangling into the water, and boil the water for 20 minutes. The water that drips from the lid into the cup is distilled.

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Rain barrel collection link from the Hoodlums site. Including diagrams.

http://survival.com/IVB/lofiversion/index.php?t8999.html

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I remember how I drooled over Darlene's account of how she had a well on her Miami property. While I don't think my association will approve that. For the sake of possible emergencies, I have been considering other ideas. Cookie outside the box again.(Or too much Flu meds crazy )

 

 

This is a snip from another site:

Just a side note; Some preparedness folks take a look at hydrology maps - even some metropolitan hydro maps may note natural springs, streams, abandoned wells, or underground drainage and seasonal watershed areas on private and public properties that are ignored, long forgotten or unused. I imagine there may be quite a few springs or wells nearby if you're in a rural area that has has very old homes or farms. Such watering holes may not provide a good solution for your needs, but it might be worth taking note of in a serious emergency.snip

 

I considered this to use along with water harvesting and conserving. Rain collection etc.

 

I found these things in a few minutes. A small list of larger springs with directions and links. A list of well use and artesians plus some cool places where torm drainoff is. I'm aware all of this will require care and filtering.

 

Consider googling the same for your area. It only takes a few minutes and gives you more than one option for finding water. So, do you have a plan for finding water in the advent of a extreme natural disaster? When the regular faucett doesn't come on?

http://www.miamiconservancy.org/

 

http://sjr.state.fl.us/programs/abandonedwells.html

 

http://www.tfn.net/Springs/Springbook/

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can you have a spa on your patio? I know many places that won't allow it but some do. While it might seem expensive at first... think about coming home from work and relaxing in a nice hot spa! stress melting away and it doubles as drinking water!

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Westie, I don't know if you'd want to drink properly disinfected spa water. I was always told you definitely shouldn't drink pool water. But, you could wash your dishes with it and flush.

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Originally Posted By: nmchick
Cookie, I love the hydrology map idea. I think you need to change your name to "SmartCookie". smile



LOL...smart cookie? Don't I wish!

But, look at this...

http://www.zianet.com/lwv/nmwater.htm

I found this is for you in a few minutes with a couple of good links for NM which has unique water woes and needs. Use the word Hydrology and you'll get all kinds of cool links.

grin

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ok, don't drink pool or spa water!

 

 

I would! it is chlorinated. Chlorine needs to be replaced because it dissipates into the air.

 

 

I am not sure where people get this stuff... don't drink pool water!

 

In the case of a water stoppage, once it starts again it may need to be boiled and filtered! no less then any water I would drink from sources that I couldn't trust.

 

 

 

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Luckily I'm not a great distance from our local (major)river. Twice a day with a wateroller and poured through a slow filter should keep stocks topped up.

 

Ogre

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Emergency Sources of Water

In an emergency, if you have not previously stored water and commercial or public sources of water are not available, drain water from your plumbing system. Unless you are advised that the public water supply has been contaminated and is not safe, open the drain valve at the bottom of the water heater and salvage the water stored in the heater. A typical water heater holds 30-60 gallons of water. Discard the first few gallons if they contain rust or sediment. Let the water heater cool before draining it from the heater so it does not scald you. Turn off the electricity or gas to the water heater to prevent the heater from operating without water. Once water has been drained into clean, sanitized containers, add 5-7 drops of chlorine bleach* per gallon of water, and stir or shake the solution to mix it. Let it set 30 minutes before use.

 

Emergency Outdoor Water Sources

 

If you need to find water outside your home, you can use these sources. Be sure to treat the water first. Additional sources include:

 

Rainwater Streams, rivers and other moving bodies of water Ponds and lakes Natural springs Avoid water with floating material, an odor or dark color. Use saltwater only if you distill it first. You should not drink flood water.

 

Hidden Water Sources in Your Home

 

If a disaster catches you without a stored supply of clean water, you can use the water in your hot-water tank, pipes and ice cubes. As a last resort, you can use water in the reservoir tank of your toilet (not the bowl).

 

Do you know the location of your incoming water valve? You’ll need to shut it off to stop contaminated water from entering your home if you hear reports of broken water or sewage lines.

 

To use the water in your pipes, let air into the plumbing by turning on the faucet in your house at the highest level. A small amount of water will trickle out. Then obtain water from the lowest faucet in the house.

 

To use the water in your hot-water tank, be sure the electricity or gas is off, and open the drain at the bottom of the tank. Start the water flowing by turning off the water intake valve and turning on a hot-water faucet. Do not turn on the gas or electricity when the tank is empty.

 

Using Swimming Pool Water

You should always view your pool as “backup” water; keep the water treated; you never know when it will be needed! The maintenance of the free chlorine residual will prevent establishment of any microorganisms. The maintenance level should be kept about 3-5ppm free chlorine. (See Water Purification for detailed information on purifying pool water.) If other stored water stocks are not available, remove the necessary pool water and boil it or just treat with chlorine to the normal 5ppm. It is best to err on the side of caution.

 

Covering the pool at all times when not in use is a very good idea. Try to keep the cover clean and wash the area you put it on when removing it from the pool.

 

 

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No swimming pool? If you have a truck that won't likely be going anywhere soon, you can make a "Redneck Swimming Pool" with it. Simply line the bed of the truck with heavy duty plastic sheeting and add water.

 

No truck? Dig a hole, line it with the plastic sheeting and fill with water. Cover with another sheet of plastic.

 

Tip: As you dig the hole, mound a tight ring of dirt about a foot away from around the edge of the hole. Drape the liner over this ring of dirt and secure with weights or soil. This will help prevent dirty rainwater from draining into the hole.

 

Uncover the hole during rainy times to renew some of the depleted water.

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wonder what to do with a water bed mattress? yeah, yeah, I know it isn't food grade. Treat it!

 

get charcoal for filtering water... it will make it taste sweet again.

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Never underestimate looking for books on the subject either. Here's one on the location of water in Arizona and the shaping of the water policies.

 

(snip) About 900 million acre-feet of recoverable water was estimated to be within 1200 feet of the land surface in the Basin and Range Lowlands Province aquifers ...

 

 

http://books.google.com/books?id=pr5-FsaVe...esults#PPA53,M1

 

and some other ideas:

http://books.google.com/books?q=+subject:%...cts_s&cad=3

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Originally Posted By: PureCajunSunshine
No swimming pool? If you have a truck that won't likely be going anywhere soon, you can make a "Redneck Swimming Pool" with it. Simply line the bed of the truck with heavy duty plastic sheeting and add water.

No truck? Dig a hole, line it with the plastic sheeting and fill with water. Cover with another sheet of plastic.

Tip: As you dig the hole, mound a tight ring of dirt about a foot away from around the edge of the hole. Drape the liner over this ring of dirt and secure with weights or soil. This will help prevent dirty rainwater from draining into the hole.

Uncover the hole during rainy times to renew some of the depleted water.



When this thread was bumped up I was scanning through the posts and came across this. A long time ago someone sent me this; I couldn't resist posting it here:

redneck.jpg

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Most pools and hot tubs are treated with 'stabilizer' which is cyanuric acid. It is not nice stuff to drink! I'm trying to figure out if my (Aqua-rain)filter will take this stuff out, I'm near positive it will since it filters out pretty near everything!

 

The Aqua-rain people say the filter will take out all 'volatile organic chemicals' argh. People just can't say yes or no, can they? Chemistry was a long time ago, but I'm fairly sure this is organic, off to look into it.

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Originally Posted By: MommyofSeven


In our present home, we have only store bought water, and limited storage space at that. This is one of my primary concerns.

Mo7


We too, are trying to lay in more water: bottled for drinking and water for bathing/other stuff.

Last summer I saw the need for this first hand when we had to have our entire sewer re-dug and reconnected. I didn't have running water for almost 4 days. I felt like I was living in the sticks, NOT just outside of a downtown area.

Not only did I beg showers from friends, the gym, etc, I was AMAZED eek at how much water we went through, drinking, washing, FLUSHING!

I felt like my grandmother did when she got indoor plumbing in high school - like doing a dance! cheer

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Originally Posted By: Crazy4Canning
Originally Posted By: MommyofSeven


In our present home, we have only store bought water, and limited storage space at that. This is one of my primary concerns.

Mo7


We too, are trying to lay in more water: bottled for drinking and water for bathing/other stuff.

Last summer I saw the need for this first hand when we had to have our entire sewer re-dug and reconnected. I didn't have running water for almost 4 days. I felt like I was living in the sticks, NOT just outside of a downtown area.

Not only did I beg showers from friends, the gym, etc, I was AMAZED eek at how much water we went through, drinking, washing, FLUSHING!

I felt like my grandmother did when she got indoor plumbing in high school - like doing a dance! cheer


Seriously consider getting a rain barrel for the balcony or backyard and a water barrel to put in a closet or corner. You can get siphons and hand pumps for the water.
You can get collapsible carriers.

I have a thing like this water safe to use in one of my tubs in an emergency (I won't be taking a bath anytime sdoon during an emergency.. laugh )

http://www.mywatersafe.com/catalog.asp

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Here's a couple more links for water ideas and threads discussed in other Mrs. S forums-

 

sunning

 

 

55 gallon water barrels

 

http://www.mrssurvival.com/forums/ubbthrea...true#Post177402

 

water needs?

http://www.mrssurvival.com/forums/ubbthrea...true#Post176147

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We also have a pod for in the bath tub in case of emergency. Ours is the Aqua Pod Kit. I didn't reallize there were so many brands out there. I think that when we finally get to buy a new house, we will have one of these in each bathroom.

 

We will also be doing the rain barrel and I'll check out the water barrels to see if I can find a local source. That shipping is a killer.

 

Quote:
Most pools and hot tubs are treated with 'stabilizer' which is cyanuric acid. It is not nice stuff to drink!

This was the chemical responsible for the pet food recalls of 2007. Definately not something you want to consume.

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