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Oil lamps


GoatLady

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Just turn your wick down. Light it. Adjust wick down. THEN put the globe on and do the final tweeking to get max. light with min. smoke.

 

And just wash the globe with soap and water. Will come right off.

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Also, when first filling (or refilling) the lamp, it will light better if you wait a few minutes to allow the wick to be saturated with the oil.

 

I have had oil lamps for over a decade and have stocked up on the lamp oil; unfortunately, during our last power outage I discovered that I cannot tolerate oil lamps or candles with my asthma. The asthma has worsened significantly over the last couple years (requiring hospitalization, etc.), and it doesn't take much to severely limit my breathing. I'm going to have to purchase some battery operated lanterns, I guess.

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so I can lower the wick while burning? I was afraid it would expload if I did that LOL.

Easy way to extinguish the lamp: Lower the wick level slightly but not enough to wedge it down into the gears. Angle your hand behind the chimney top (out of burn-your-hand range - don't touch it!). Blow onto your hand and deflect that air down the chimney. Expect some amount of chimney cleaning will be necessary.

MtRider
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Okay, I got my new-to-me (thrift store) lamps back out to play with. And now I have a question. Like GL, I get a huge flame. So just how low can I lower the wick? The wick comes out of a metal sort-of-sheath that fits it exactly. From there it's about another 3/8 inch to the top of the burner. Can I really lower it down so barely the top shows out of that sheath? Are you sure? Should I test it outdoors first?

 

Sorry if I'm being redundant, but I have zero experience with these and don't want to earn a Darwin Award.

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You can lower it down right into the sheath. If you lower it too far, it should just go out. If it makes you more comfortable to test it outside, then by all means do.

 

Not redundant at all. Better safe than sorry.

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when I want to turn my lamp out. I lower the wick all the way down!

 

when I want to light it, I raise it!

 

I lower it and put on chimmney and then raise and lower wick until I have it where I want it.

 

oh go ahead and try it..the knob on the side won't bite!

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With mine I find the wick needs to be well INSDE the sheath to give the most light with no smoke. We had an amish day yeterday, except for the puter and occasionally the stove we used no electricity

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Alright folks, thanks for the reassurance. I gave it another try, and it does burn nicely with the wick low.

 

For about 30 seconds.

 

The light gets dimmer and dimmer and needs turning up. If I were trying to do something, I'd literally be stopping at least every minute to turn up the lamp.

 

I am using Lamplight brand Ultra Pure clear paraffin. I belive my wicks are cotton; they came from Walmart and seem like cotton, but I've discarded the package.

 

Thoughts? Suggestions?

 

PS Test your preps!

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OK try this.......

if you burned the tip of the wick from before you need to cut off a bit? turn up the wick (don't light) until it is about 1 inch above the metal (hope you took off the globe). then cut (with good scissors) straight across just below any burned parts. crank it back down and try again. we turn it up until we can see the wick - light it - then turn down a bit until we get a good light - then turn up just a bit for bright light. Now you may do as we do and every now and then turn up the wick and just pinch off some of the black soot with your fingers (makes the wick last longer)

 

good luck - and good for you for keep trying and not giving up.

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I trimmed the wick as you described. Lit the lamp, and regulated the flame. There is about 1/4 to 3/8 of an inch between the top of the sheath and the top of the burner. I feel like I have a good amount of light if the flame is about another 1/4 to 3/8 inch above the top of the burner.

 

I adjusted the wick so that the flame was there and within 2 - 3 minutes, the flame had decreased to only 1/8 inch above the top of the burner. From there it burned steadily and did not decrease anymore. It was so dim that I was unable to read right in front of it. I had the lamp on a table, with a book right between me and the lamp.

 

Am I expecting more light than it can give?

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<>

 

perhaps.

 

It is should give off enough light for you to see, not bright light after all if is only a step above a candle!

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To get more light from your lamps, lanterns, candles, etc, use mirrors. They can be used to direct and intensify the light. Many antique lamps came with a reflector connected to them just for that purpose. Large mirrors hung on the walls will lighten the whole room, small mirrors behind or beside the source will direct the light. For reading, try putting a mirror on the opposite side of the book from the source and direct it back onto the page, from over your shoulder if possible. A small mirror actually makes a bright circle on your page.

 

Also, there are various ways to trim the wick to achieve different light. Trimmed slanted all to one side gives you a different light than trimming the wick to a point in the center or curving it in an arch. All of these, IMHO are better than just flat across. Try your wick in different cuts to see which works best with your particular wick and need.

 

I bought Wal-mart wicks also but did not find them especially good. They tend to need to be trimmed several times during a burning and don't give off a great ligt.

 

If you can't get your chimneys clean with just soap and water you can use a bit of lamp oil on a rag to clean them, just let them air a bit before lighing the lamp again.

 

As an aside, a rag wet with lamp oil and dipped in the soot on the inside of a wood stove, (like on the underside of a lid on a cook stove) makes a great cleaning rag for the outside of a wood stove. Good substitute for stove black. I clean the black top of my Home Comfort this way (but not the enamel jacket) and it gives it a nice dark shine and doesn't give off as much smell as stove black when next using the stove. I've used this on both antique parlor stoves and modern Franklin or box stoves and it works on all of them. Seems to keep it from rusting between uses as well as stove black also. Just don't use it on nickle, chrome, enamel and such, only the black iron parts.

 

 

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>

perhaps.

It is should give off enough light for you to see, not bright light after all if is only a step above a candle!


That comment was very helpful!! Thanks Westie!

My lamp is dimmer than a candle!

Off to play with it some more and see what I can do...
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I bought Wal-mart wicks also but did not find them especially good. They tend to need to be trimmed several times during a burning and don't give off a great ligt.


I have been buying my wicks from Walmart also. Do you have a source for better ones?
Stacy
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The ones I like the best have come from Amish stores (not close ones so I usually stock up when we get to them). We also have a small general store near us that stocks wicks and other lamp parts and we've bought good ones from there too though they are more expensive.

 

I have many different lamps, both modern and antique and the wick size varies greatly from tiny round ones to one inch or more. Some are hard to find. If anyone has a source for wicks it would be great if you would post it.

 

I might mention here that one of my favorite lamps are ones about three inches high, sometimes called a "courting Lamp" because it was said a Father could fill the tiny bowl with oil, light the wick when a "beau" came calling and when the flame got low it was time for him to leave. (There are "courting candle holders" which serve the same purpose) If they used the small ones I have though they'd be there for hours as mine will last with a tiny light nearly through the night making them perfect for a night light. The wicks are about the size of heavy cord and are round. With the help of a mirror I can actually use them for reading in a pinch.

 

I have my lamps all ready to go as we are getting freezing rain today and tomorrow and they have predicted a major winter storm for Sunday. Only 3 to 6 inches though so not so major unless the wind really blows with it. Still, nice to be ready.

 

 

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Aladdin lamps used to be considered top-of-the line.

 

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http://www.aladdinlamps.com/parts/

 

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I found these tips while searching for wicks:

 

Aladdin Lamp Enjoyment Tips

 

The Aladdin is a tried and tested lamp with nearly a century of use all over the globe. Literally hundreds of thousands of people are still enjoying the use of Aladdins worldwide. These tips are provided to enable you to get the most pleasure and long use from your Aladdin with the minimum of trouble and bother.

 

 

1. FILLING ALADDINS IN WINTER

Always re-fill your Aladdin with good, clean, fresh kerosene (genuine Aladdin Lamp Oil or K-1 Grade Kerosene is recommended). The fuel must be at room temperature before adding to the lamp. To do otherwise causes condensation inside the bottom of the lamp bowl. The wick will then draw up this condensed water causing it to sputter and burn unevenly - thus a poor light.

 

2. FILLING LEVEL

Fill to about ONE HALF INCH (1/2) BELOW FILLER CAP. This will give you many hours of burning without the fuel expanding into the burner and causing a flooding condition - which will result in a lamp dripping fuel. A lamp holds about one quart genuine Aladdin Lamp Oil, which will provide 10 - 12 hours of steady bright, white light.

 

3. FILLING IN SUMMER

Your Aladdin will obviously have only limited use during the summer months - perhaps for late romantic dining - or just sheer pleasure. Always keep the lamp at least half full during the summer months to avoid the wick drying out. Check daily after use. This is especially important with the hanging Aladdins. LAMP OIL SWELLS IN SUMMER'S HEAT. If the lamp is filled to capacity, oil will flood the base of the burner and this will cause fuel spillage.

 

4. ALADDIN WICKS

Wicks last for hundreds of hours of operation, if used properly and the lamp is kept from running dry. KEEP ALL PARTS OF THE LAMP CLEAN - ALL THE TIME. Stale fuel deposits will cause any oil lamp to smell. Refill often with genuine Aladdin Lamp Oil or fresh, clean K-1 grade kerosene. Always use the genuine Aladdin wick cleaner. It has the correct profile to properly clean the excess carbon from the wick's burning surface. NEVER USE SCISSORS TO TRIM YOUR WICK. The profile will be incorrect and the mantle will not light properly. The carbon char on the wick's burning surface is necessary for smooth burning, but excess carbon disturbs the profile and should be removed only with wick cleaner. When changing an Aladdin wick, always make sure to the wick is absolutely dry. Follow the instructions on the wick carton and refrain from touching the top of the wick itself, as to not deform the burning surface. Make sure the wick slides smoothly up and down after attaching to the wick raiser. After many years of service, it may be necessary to remove the wick and polish the tube upon which the wick moves for smooth operation.

 

5. ALADDIN WICK CHARRING

It is important to have a properly charred wick in order for your Aladdin to produce a good even blue flame. To char wick: (a) Remove gallery and flame spreader. (B) Turn wick up 1/8" above outer wick tube. © Dip top of wick into Aladdin lamp oil briefly (about 5 seconds). (d) Light wick and let it burn until flame goes out (3 to 5 minutes). (e) Allow top of wick to smolder or glow until completely out. (f) Use Aladdin wick cleaner to smooth top of wick. Reinstall flame spreader and gallery assembly. NOTE: WICK must be completely dry in order to char wick top.

 

6. CHIMNEY CLEANING

Use warm water and mild detergent. MAKE SURE THE CHIMNEY IS THOROUGHLY DRIED BEFORE FITTING ONTO THE LAMP. Damp chimneys break more easily.

 

7. LIGHTING BURNER

Remove the gallery, mantle and chimney as one unit. When lighting the burner, let the flame form a complete ring around the flame spreader without turning up the wick too high. When you put the gallery back onto the lamp (with the mantle and chimney in place) turn up the wick until incandescence of the mantle is just visible - and only just!

 

8. BURNING THE LAMP

Leave the lamp in this state (#6 above) to warm up for ten minutes or so. This will increase the chimney draft and thus increase the fuel flow to the wick tip. Then turn up the light. As the burner heats up, the oil being capillarized by the wick will thin out, thus increasing the oil flow to the wick tip. NEVER turn up the lamp to full brightness immediately. Doing so will cause too much fuel to flow into the burner and upset the air-to-fuel ratio of 94% air and 6% fuel. The result will be a sooted up mantle with black spots at best - and a runaway lamp at worst. NEVER LEAVE A LIGHTED ALADDIN UNATTENDED. NEVER TOUCH THE GALLERY OR CHIMNEY OF A LIT ALADDIN OR ONE RECENTLY EXTINGUISHED - SERIOUS BURN INJURY COULD RESULT!

 

http://www.survivalunlimited.com/lanternss...aladdintips.htm

(They also sell other survival equipment.)

 

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http://www.endtimesreport.com/lighting.html

 

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http://goodpick.com/

 

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Just Google "Aladdin + wicks"... or "oil lamp + wick"

 

 

 

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Thanks for the good info Cat. I have never heard of a wick cleaner tho. I looked it up http://www.aladdinlamps.com/store/viewItem.asp?idProduct=502

and was wondering if anyone could tell me how it's used. I can't figure it out from the picture...you really can't just use scissors to trim the wicks?

Stacy

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