Jump to content
MrsSurvival Discussion Forums

Using your dehydrator: 101


Cat

Recommended Posts

repost.gif

 

Cat

04/22/04

 

First, take it out of the box. nod.gif

 

Examine everything, making sure every part is there. Be sure to find the instruction booklet before the kids think it would make a great coloring book! wink.gif

 

Wash the washable parts and dry thoroughly.

 

Give it a little hug and tell it that you are going to be GOOD FRIENDS! biggrin.gif

 

If you have a second-hand food dryer with no instruction booklet, ask here if someone else has that make & model. Chances are, *someone* can copy theirs off for you.

 

It would be a good idea to check the temperatures in your dryer with a thermometer, especially if you want to try jerky.

 

Some sites try to tell you that dehydrators are "seasonal". I disagree. If you're using your dehydrator when the fruits & vegetables are in season, use it during the "off seasons" to do bananas, button mushrooms, jerky, etc.

 

A good book is essential, if you can get one. If not, check out your local library! (FREE info at your fingertips!! )

 

If your DH/significant other is a meat-eater, I guarantee that once you make beef jerky he will encourage you in your dehydrating endeavors. And your jerky won't last long enough to spoil.

 

A good "starter" recipe is just to slice a good piece of lean sirloin steak (watch for sales) into thin, very even slices and marinate them in bottled Teriaki sauce in the refrigerator for a few hours or overnight. (Freezing the steak first and letting it very *slightly* thaw makes it easier to slice evenly.) Then dry as directed.

 

Try button mushrooms! Wash & dry, trim off the ends of stems, slice evenly, dry. Use in casseroles, soups, etc. (Whirl dry in food processor or blender for a finer product that reconstitues quickly.)

 

Bananas are easy but require dipping in a pretreating liquid to keep the color and texture nicely. (I've got a recipe I'll post soon)

 

I use sturdy (name brand) freezer zip-lock bags to store dried foods. Freezer bags are thicker and less likely to split or tear. You can squeeze out excess air that might contain moisture, unlike a glass jar.

 

OK, now...

 

Try something!! And tell us how it went!

 

(Ask if you have further questions!)

 

GOOGLE finds:

http://www.ag.uiuc.edu/~vista/html_pubs/DRYING/dryfood.html

 

http://64.233.161.104/search?q=cache:Ftn...foods&hl=en

 

http://muextension.missouri.edu/xplor/hesg...dnut/gh1562.htm

 

http://www.cahe.nmsu.edu/pubs/_e/e-322.html (interesting comments on the possible benefits of precooking beef jerky)

 

http://www.extension.umn.edu/distribution/...ion/DJ0820.html

 

USING dehydrated foods:

 

http://waltonfeed.com/grain/ldscn/74b.html

 

http://www.budget101.com/dehydrated_foods.htm

 

http://chefnoah.com/Cooking/using_dried_foods.htm

 

 

 

************

 

 

Caveman

04/22/04

 

Couple of tips to add here....when using a ziplock bag stick a straw into the corner after closing the bag most of the way and suck out rest of the air and zip shut quickly while removing the straw. Or if you have one of those vac-pac machines you can bag the product in slightly longer than needed bags and then reseal after removing some of the food making it a reusable bag.

 

 

************

 

 

debbielee

04/23/04

 

Give apples a try.......they come out so great!!

 

Slice apples into rings.......dip in cinnamon/sugar mix and dehydrate........you can either peel or not...just take out the core (use a plastic maple syrup cap as a cutter)...dip in pineapple juice first or not.....i used pineapple juice cuz it helps to keep the slices from turning brown and adds a nice flavor......but it's not necessary.....and then also dry the pineapple rings.....they come out really nicely too.........even though my directions said not to put sugar/cinn on the apples.......i did it and they tasted sooooo much better than just plain.

 

I did strawberries Kiaja......they came out nicely....and great in cerials ....but don't keep em tooooo long cuz they loose flavor and are yuckie lookin (brown) after a while...

 

 

 

************

 

 

unikemom

07/16/04

 

I have had my dehydrator for 6 years now, and use it faithfully. I dry my chives, parsley, cilantro, onions, and when someone close to us dies, all the immediate family members choose a flower off of the casket cover, I bring mine home and dry them, they keep forever.

that way I always have something of that special person.

 

 

 

************

 

 

waiting

03/30/06

 

Question for all of you experienced dehydrators. We live in a very high humidity area. I have considered and looked at dehydrators but never purchased one because of my concern about the high humidity here and being able to store the food. Would this be a problem? If so, how could I correct it so I could store dehydrated items? What is the average shelf life of a dehydrated food? Need more info before purchasing a dehydrater.

 

 

************

 

 

Mother

03/31/06

 

If you have high humidity in your area I would suggest that you get a dehydrator with a fan, not one of the small round convection ones. A fan will keep the warm air moving and the humidity forced out.

 

If you are hoping to dehydrate foods without electricity, say after the SHTF, it will be harder to do in a more humid environment but not impossible. Before you purchase a dehydrator, look at the trays in it with an eye to using them to dehydrate foods without electricity, either as is in the dehydrator set in the sunshine, or in some home made appliance. Most are too closed in to use as-is but the trays can be utilized easily. Also, if you make or think you might want to make yogurt or sour cream, be sure to look to see if the dehydrator has temperature settings for that. Some do, most don't, especially the new ones. An old one I have has settings for fruits, vegetables, meats, yogurt and raising breads but it's small with only four trays.

 

Fo those of you who are handy there are a lot of very good hand made dehydrator instructions on line. Some just using a cardboard box. My DH made one years ago from plywood, plexiglass, and tent screening for the trays (with a back up light bulb and fan in case of inclimate weather) that would dehydrate a bushel of apples at a time.

 

Vaccuum sealed, most dried products will keep for years. I don't have one so I often store my dried items in my freezer if I have space. They don't have to be however. I have stored properly dehydrated produce just on a shelf in a dark area for five or more years and not had them go bad. They may start to lose their taste and their nutritional value after the first year or two though.

 

Hope this helps some.

 

 

************

 

 

RaineLovesJ

04/01/06

 

If your dehyrator doesn't have a fan (mine doesn't), you can hang, or set, a little fan nearby pointed at the unit. I've had good success with this.

I've dried EVERYTHING! Peels and tops of (organic) fruits & veggies for rat treats, or even to grind into powder and add to soups and sauces for thickening and extra flavor.

If your apples and pears are a little too yucky to eat, peel away the bruised spots and blend into sauce. Pour into the trays (you can cover them with wax paper, parchment paper, or plastic wrap) and make fruit leather.

Mainly now I just use mine to dry herbs for tinctures. I've got a batch of peppers going now.

Anything on the verge of going bad is fodder for the dehydrator. It's a whole new way of saving food...

 

-Raine

 

 

 

************

 

 

westbrook

05/09/06

 

Many food Items just don't can or don't can well, but they do dry!

 

http://www.healthgoods.com/Education/Nutri..._vegetables.htm

 

 

The War Garden Victorious - Appendix 1I

Victory Edition 1919 HOME CANNING & DRYING of Vegetables & Fruits

 

http://www.earthlypursuits.com/WarGarV/Hom...eCanDryVE25.htm

 

 

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09308.html

 

 

so much information here! http://www.drying123.com/gen1.htm

Link to post

DEHYDRATING

 

 

Cat

04/23/04

 

BANANAS

 

Choose all yellow or lightly speckled bananas. Too green and they won’t be sweet; too ripe and they will be unappetizing.

 

Preheat the dehydrator at 5-10 degrees higher than the recommended temperature for your food (about 135 degrees F). The moisture in the food cools your dryer at first, so my book says to leave it at the slightly higher temperature for one hour at the beginning of your food drying, then turn down to the recommended temp.

 

Bananas must be pretreated before drying. Dip in unsweetened pineapple juice, Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) dissolved in water (1 Tbsp. crushed & dissolved in 1 qt. water), or try the honey dip (my favorite!).

 

(Honey Dip: )

**Dissolve 1 c sugar in 3 c hot water. Cool to lukewarm, then stir in 1 c honey.**

 

Peel the bananas and cut into 1/8” to 1/4” slices, removing any bruised portions

 

Dip fruit in small batches, remove with slotted spoon, and drain well before placing them on the trays.

 

Dry at 135 degrees until leathery, roughly 8 hours.

 

Eat as a snack or crumble into cookies, cakes, or cereal.

 

 

************

 

 

debbielee

04/23/04

 

I made banana chips using the honey dip and they came out like sticky hard things......did'nt like em at all.......i had more luck cutting them thinly..length wise....and doing no treatments and they came out like curly twigs but were tastier......just what i found...

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

04/24/04

 

Hmmm, debbielee, I wouldn't have ever tried them without a dip. I'll have to try it & see! Thanks!

 

Another easy thing to try:

 

ONIONS

 

Dried onions are very versatile in cooking, and require no pretreatment, which means if you can get past the initial chopping without tears, they’re *easy* to dry and good to use. They do, however reabsorb moisture more easily, so you’ll have to be careful to keep them dry. I save the food-grade silica crystal packs (they absorb moisture in the air) I find in vitamins and reuse them in things like this.

 

Dried chopped onions can be whirled dry in a food processor or blender to make a dry powder to use in cooking. You can keep it in a jar in the freezer to avoid clumping.

 

Don’t dry onions with other vegetables because of their smell and taste, which most likely would transfer somewhat to the other food.

 

You might try refrigerating (for 5-12 hours) the onions you plan to chop to dry, because some people swear they don’t cause tears as easily.

 

After you’re finished, wash your hands while rubbing a stainless steel utensil all over your hands where the onion smell is, and the smell pretty much disappears!

 

Remove the root and top, and peel off the papery outer layers. Cut the onion into 1/4 to 1/8” slices, and chop.

 

Dry at 145 degrees F until leathery.

 

 

************

 

 

Dee

04/24/04

 

OK Cat, I'm going to try the apples and onions. My MIL has the best apple tree I've ever eaten from. I eat about 4 apples a day when they're ripe but no matter how many I eat I can't eat them all! Sooo, I'm going to try drying some, they sound good. I've frozen onions but never dried them. This year I'm going to!

 

Thanks!

 

 

************

 

 

MommyofSix

04/24/04

 

Has anyone done minced onions or garlic? They're so small I can't put them on a rack. Maybe a screen? Oooh, going to talk to dh about making a screen for the oven! LOL

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

04/24/04

 

My deydrator has a fine plastic screen, but I can't always depend on things *not* falling through.

 

I keep meaning to try plastic window screening. Just have to figure out if they're *food safe*!

 

Just don't use any metal screening. It can cause problems with chemical interactions.

 

**EDITED**

 

I found this:

 

SUN DRYING:

 

Prepared foods are placed on drying trays. Stainless steel screening and thin wood lath are good materials for home-constructed drying trays. As aluminum screening reacts with acids in the fruit, it is less desirable. Do not use galvanized, copper, fiberglass, or vinyl screening.

 

Trays measuring about 14" X 24" X1" are an easy size to handle. If trays are to be used in an oven, they should be 1-1/2" smaller in length and width than oven shelves to allow air circulation.

 

Place trays of food away from dusty roads and yards. Elevate them at least 1" above the table with spools or bricks to allow good air circulation below the food.

 

Cover the food with a muslin or cheesecloth tent to protect it from insects. Dry fruits in direct sunlight; move trays periodically to assure direct sun exposure. Place vegetables in the shade to prevent excessive color loss.

 

If weather turns rainy, you will have to complete the drying process using another method.

 

To destroy insects or their eggs that may be on sun-dried foods and to remove additional moisture in thicker pieces, heat foods in a 150° oven for 30 min.

 

OVEN DRYING:

 

Either build trays as described for sun drying or convert oven racks to drying racks by stretching muslin or cheesecloth across the oven rack. Secure with

toothpicks or long sewn stitches. Alternate trays in the oven periodically to assure even drying.

 

Set oven control at its lowest setting, but not below 140-50°. If using an electric oven, wedge a potholder between oven and door to allow a 1" opening. Moisture from the drying food will vent through this opening. Close the door on a gas oven, as vent will permit moisture to escape.

 

http://www.cahe.nmsu.edu/pubs/_e/e-322.html

 

 

************

 

 

debbielee

04/24/04

 

A Great tip i was taught...from HERE i think........if you use a electric food dehydrator....like i do......go to sewing section of ANY STORE and buy the White Plastic Needlepoint/craft mesh... each sheet is around 60 cents....and all you have to do is Cut it to fit your trays....it stops the smaller foods from going through.....is washable and works like a charm.......the only thing i've found is if you do red peppers.....the color stains....but who cares right?

 

GREAT TIP about the dry absorber thingies from vitamins.....your goooooood Kitty!

I've never dried onions cuz i was afraid the house would reek of onions while they where drying....so i thought of putting the dehydrator outside....and give that a shot...you can never have enuff dried onions.

 

And Dee.....you'll lOVE the apples for snacking.....they are a real treat!

 

I've had great success drying Peppers...ya don't have to blanch them ...just cut them and dry.....some veggies/fruits you have to blanch first.....and carrots are great to use in soups especially.......they are cute when you dry them....like tons of orange toenails..hahhaha

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

04/25/04

 

I think this is from Armorer or DoubleOught (some of you remember!! ). It's more involved than just using the Teriaki sauce, but after your DH gets wind of new *recipes* for your jerky, HE'LL be buying the meat for you!

 

BEEF JERKY

 

2 c soy sauce

1/2 c water

3 Tbs Worcestershire sauce

1 Tbs liquid smoke (look near the Worcestershire sauce in the grocery)

1 Tbs garlic powder or onion powder (or, in proportion, use both if you're adventurous!)

1 Tbs ground ginger

black pepper (optional)

 

Mix well and marinate thin slices of sirloin steak 4 hours to overnight. Dry for jerky.

 

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

04/26/04

 

CORN

 

Corn begins to lose its flavor soon after picking, so process it immediately. The faster, the tastier!

 

You can use sweet corn or fresh field corn.

 

Remove the husk and the silk, then trim the end if it’s long. Steam the corn on the cob until the milk inside has “set”. Test it by cutting a few kernels, and if the milk doesn’t come out, it’s ok. (Write down the approximate time for your future reference… mine is about 4 minutes.)

 

Cut the corn of the cob, trying not to cut part of the cob with it. (I usually carefully cut off the kernels and the scrape the rest of the cob off into what will become corn for supper.)

 

Spread the corn onto the trays (these will dry small!!!) in a single layer and dry at 125 degrees F until brittle. Stir the corn several times to help it dry evenly.

 

Reconstituted, this can be used in corn fritters, soups, stews, breads, or creamed. It can be ground up dry for cornmeal.

 

 

************

 

 

MommyofSix

04/26/04

 

About potatoes...

 

We eat a LOT of potatoes, and I don't have the freezer space to freeze them. I'd prefer to buy a bunch on sale and preserve them.

 

How do you rehydrate them? Are they OK mashed? What about fried? I did some searching so now I know to blanch them and all that good stuff, but I'm still wondering about once the dehydrating is done, LOL.

 

Thanks!

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

04/26/04

 

I usually follow these general directions, but some things like corn I just throw into soups.

 

From my books:

 

Most dried vegetables are used after being rehydrated and cooked. You may rehydrate and cook at the same time, but they will be more tender & flavorful if rehydrated and then cooked.

 

Place the vegetables in a container and pour in an equal amount of water or juice. Cold water is fine, but boiling or hot liquid will shorten the rehydration time. But it will also start to cook them.

 

Soak them anywhere from 10 minutes to 2 hours, depending on the size of the pieces and temperature of the liquid. Soaking longer that 2 hours may restart bacterial action, spoiling the food.

 

Vegetables are considered rehydrated when they return to near-normal size.

 

Leafy vegetables like cabbage, chard, or spinach are fine enough to rehydrate during the cooking process; don't soak them.

 

POTATOES

 

My books say the Russet potatoes are the best for drying, and fresh is best. Old potatoes will have tough, leathery skins and may not taste fresh when rehydrated.

 

Wash potatoes well, peel if desired. Cut as desired; french-fry style in 1/4 “ pieces, or 1/4-1/8” slices, or grate.

 

Steam blanch 4-6 minutes, then rinse well in cool water (may turn black during drying if not properly pretreated).

 

Dry at 125 degrees F for 6-12 hours, until brittle and semi-transparent. Test and store carefully; any lingering moisture can cause the whole batch to mold.

 

Reconstituted, use in soups, casseroles, potato dishes. Very thin slices may be used dried as “chips” with dips.

 

I would guess that if you dried cooked potatoes as "flakes" or grind them, you could use them for mashed, but it would be difficult (IN MY OPINION) to cook and then mash the larger pieces.

 

But then nothing ventured, nothing "learned"!!!

 

 

************

 

 

Snowmom

04/27/04

 

We have never had good luck drying potatoes.

 

I have a neice who has made a lot of potato chips by drying them, they turned out real good for her.

 

Guess we will have to try it again this fall when the potatoes get dug. So, this is a print out post.

 

 

************

 

 

happygirl

04/27/04

 

Now with dehidrated foods for storage....would you have to keep extra water? If I had to choose between canning and dehidrating (right now I can't afford to buy either! ), wouldn't they both take about as much space? Because even though the dry stuff is smaller, wouldn't you need the water to reconstitute(sp?) it? just wonderin'...for when I can afford it!

 

 

************

 

 

MommyofSix

04/27/04

 

For some things yes, but...

 

That water could be used for other things, or, if the flavors wouldn't clash, you could use water you'd previously cooked/rehydrated something in. So I would think you wouldn't need a whole bunch extra per serving.

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

04/27/04

 

I'm afraid you'd probably have to think about the water. At least with canning, you *have* that extra liquid that can be used - vegetable water for soups & casseroles, fruit liquids for jello, desserts, etc.

 

So it's a consideration.

 

If you're camping or on the move, dried foods can be chewed for snacks/nutrition and carried without breakage worries, though.

 

 

 

TOMATOES

 

I’ve done tomatoes, and I like them powdered best. It’s easy to stir in the amount of powder you need for your recipe, and if you need tomato paste, you can mix just what you need instead of opening a whole can.

 

Low-acid tomatoes, which include many of the newer types, will turn black while drying. My book says to puree those in a blender, and add 1 Tbsp lemon juice or vinegar per quart to them before drying as a “leather”. Then cut into useable pieces or grind into powder. Dry using kitchen parchment paper or plastic wrap on trays.

 

Varieties with meaty walls are better for drying.

 

Wash tomatoes and core/remove stem. To remove skins, dip them first in boiling water, then immediately in cold water. The skins should slip off easily.

 

Halve cherry tomatoes, slice larger tomatoes into 1/4” slices.

 

Dry at 145 degrees F until leathery or brittle.

 

Use in soups, chili, stews, sauces, or flavoring with other vegetables. Powdered tomatoes can be used as tomato sauce, paste, or catsup.

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

04/28/04

 

Mix this as you prefer. For example, I don’t like celery taste as much, so I’d probably use less of the celery flakes & seeds.

 

 

SAVORY SEASONING MIX

 

3 Tbsp dried onion flakes

1/4 c dried parsley flakes

1 tsp powdered garlic

dash of cayenne pepper

3 tsp sea salt

1 tsp seasoned salt (Lawreys)

1 tsp ground pepper

1/4 c dried celery flakes

1/4 c celery seeds

2 tsp dill seeds

2 Tbsp paprika

1/4 c poppy seeds

2 c sesame seeds

3 c grated dried cheese (Parmesan or Romano)

 

Mix all ingredients together. Place in an airtight container & store in a cool, dry place. Makes about 1 quart.

 

Sprinkle on potatoes, casseroles, or salads.

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

04/29/04

 

STRAWBERRIES

 

Choose large berries that are intensely red, firm, and juicy, with no soft spots.

 

Wash berries, then cut off green caps and slice 1/4” to 3/8” thick.

 

Dry at 135 degrees F until leathery and crisp.

 

Use in yogurt, pies, pancakes, or plain as a snack.

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

05/01/04

 

DRIED GARLIC

 

Cover drying trays with parchment paper or plastic wrap.

 

Peel and finely chop garlic bulbs. Spread onto trays, dry at 105 degrees F until crisp.

 

Store as is or grind to a powder in a blender or mortar & pestle.

 

To make garlic salt, use 1 part garlic powder to 4 parts salt.

 

 

 

PARSLEY

 

Wash parsley lightly under cold running water. Separate clusters and throw away long or tough stems.

 

Spread over drying trays. Dry for about 1 hour at no more than 95 degrees F until crisp and papery.

 

Store in small airtight containers, and crush before using. (Store carefully, as it reabsorbs moisture easily.)

 

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

05/02/04

 

ASAPARAGUS

 

Asparagus does not store well so process as soon as possible.

 

Wash spears and break or cut off the tough end.

 

Slice remainder into 1” pieces. Blanche if desired.

 

Dry at 125 degrees F until brittle.

 

Rehydrated, serve in sauces or soups.

 

 

GREEN OR WAX BEANS

 

Stringless varieties are best for drying.

 

Wash beans and remove the pointed ends. (I don’t know why… )

 

Cut into 1” pieces or slice “French style”.

 

If desired, pretreat by blanching.

 

Dry at 125 degrees F until brittle.

 

Rehydrated, serve as a side dish cooked with pork or ham for added flavor, or combine with other vegetables in soups and casseroles.

 

 

************

 

 

debbielee

05/02/04

 

Didn’t know asparagus could be dried.....iiinteresting......

 

I laughed when i read the green beans.....cuz i did some and man....are they CUTE when they are dehydrated!!

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

05/04/04

 

Yes, debbielee... the housewives used to string them on strings and dry them up near the warm wood-stove-heated ceilings. They laughed, too, and called them "leather britches"!!

 

 

 

SWEET PEPPERS

 

Any sweet pepper can be dried - green, red, yellow, or the newer darker varieties. Choose fresh peppers with thick walls.

 

Remove stem, seeds, and white membranes, then wash and dry peppers..

 

Cut into 1/4" strips or rings, or chop in a blender.

 

Dry at 125 degrees F until leathery.

 

Use dried as flavorings as you would use fresh chopped peppers. Great in dips, casseroles, omelets, etc.

 

 

RHUBARB

 

NEVER eat rhubarb leaves… they are poisonous!

 

Wash rhubarb, trim pulled end and discard leaves.

 

Cut into 1” pieces.

 

Dry at 135 degrees F until leathery.

 

Cook dried rhubarb for sauce, add it to pies, or eat dry as a snack.

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

05/07/04

 

DEHYDRATING MEATS

 

Somewhere back in time, man learned that laying strips of meat in the sun dried it well enough to preserve it for use during the winter. Later, someone (I like to think it was a smart woman!!) found that hanging the strips in smoke (probably to keep bugs off of it!!) not only improved the flavor but also better kept it from spoiling. Salting meat and fish before drying was also found to retard spoiling and improve flavor.

 

Today we know that the chemicals in smoke inhibit bacterial growth, and the nitrates in salt do the same. We call it “curing” meats. Though you must use care while curing meat, it is still one of the most effective ways to keep meat and fish without refrigeration.

 

The two basic types of dehydrated meats are dehydrated cooked meat and jerky. Both are dried in the same ways.

 

Lean meats and low-fat fish keep well when dried, but fatty ones spoil quickly. Never dehydrate pork; use only lean parts of *cooked* ham. (Pork must be cooked to be sure it’s safe.) Higher-fat fish may be dried, but must be refrigerated and used as soon as possible. So only choose fresh lean meats and low fat fish for dehydrating.

 

Drying cooked meats is a good way to use up leftovers. It keeps meat tender and ready for use in sandwiches, soups, and casseroles.

 

Cooked meat should be lean and thoroughly cooked. If it’s been cooked in broth, drain it and chill it before dehydrating. The chilling allows you to easily remove any fat. Trim fat from the meat and cut into 1/2” inch cubes.

 

Work with small batches and use careful sanitation. Start your dehydrator at 145 degrees F (if you turn it back to 125 degrees toward the end of the drying process, your cooked meat may be more tender). Evenly spread meat on trays, then dry the cubes from 6 to 12 hours, occasionally stirring. Be sure your dehydrator runs continuously until the meat is dry. Cubes will be tough to hard when done (a cooled cube will be difficult to cut if dried). Blot off any oil before storing. To use, soak in broth or water for 30-60 minutes, then simmer until done.

 

BEEF or VENISON: Best dried as cubes for use in stews and soups.

 

HAM: may be sliced into thin slices or cubes. Be sure it is a fully cooked ham and use lean pieces, spreading only one layer deep on drying trays. Use in bean or cabbage soups, casseroles, or flavoring in meat dishes.

 

POULTRY: Never dry duck or goose because the meat is too fatty. Use chicken or turkey cubes in casseroles or soups.

 

 

MAKING JERKY

 

Jerky is one of the most interesting products you can make with your dehydrator. Jerky cures usually center around salt, but you can make up whatever recipe you choose according to your own tastes. Besides salt, you can use soy sauce, Worcestershire sauce, tomato or barbecue sauce, onion, garlic or curry powder, liquid “smoke” flavoring, seasoned salt, black or red pepper… whatever sounds good!

 

Pick a lean cut of raw meat with as little fat as possible. Or use leftover cooked meat. A meat slicer will make quick and even slices, but you can partially freeze raw meat to get nice, even slices while it’s firm. If you slice with the grain, it will be chewy; across the grain will be more tender but also more brittle. Cut meat into strips about 1” wide, about 1/4” thick, and as long as you want. Trim off any obvious fat.

 

“Dry cures” are salt and seasoning mixtures rubbed into the meat surfaces. Spread the strips in a single layer on a cutting board or other flat surface. Sprinkle the curing mixture evenly on both sides of the meat strips, then layer the strips on top of each other in a glass or plastic container and seal tightly. Refrigerate overnight.

 

“Brine cures” or marinades combine liquid with the salt and spices. Meat is soaked until the salt is absorbed, usually overnight. Use any kind of salt except rock salt, which may contain impurities. Pour the marinade over the strips, cover tightly, and place the container into the refrigerator. Stir or turn several times to ensure thorough coating.

 

Preheat your dehydrator to 145 degrees F. Shake off any excess cure and spread strips on trays in a single layer. Dry until finished, about 4-12 hours. When cooled, jerky should be like a “green stick”… pliable enough to bend but not break (although across the meat grain *might* break!).

 

BEEF: Flank, round and sirloin are the better cuts of meat to use for jerky. Lower cost cuts will make more waste & cause more work trimming the fat.

 

HAM: Use pre-cooked and processed ham for safety.

 

WILD GAME: Deer, elk, moose and bear cam all be made into jerky. Venison (deer) makes very good jerky because it is so lean. The best cuts are flank and round cuts. Before drying, wild game should be frozen for 60 days at 0 degrees F to kill any disease-carrying bacteria that may be present.

 

POULTRY: This is a great way to use up cooked leftovers! Use the same cures as you use for beef. Because poultry is more fibrous, expect it to be more brittle.

 

HAMBURGER: Start with very lean ground beef, or select a chuck roast and have it ground for you. Rather than curing, just mix the flavorings into a meatloaf-type mixture. For example: to 1 pound ground meat, add 1 tsp salt, 1 Tbsp Worcestershire sauce, and 1/4 tsp dried chopped onion.

 

Cover the dehydrator trays with parchment paper or plastic wrap, and roll out the hamburger mixture into a 1/8” layer. Dry for 4 to 6 hours at 145 degrees F. Take out the trays, blot any oil off of the meat, remove paper or plastic wrap, and return meat to trays upside-down. Dry for another 4-6 hours, until hard and leathery. Cut into strips and store.

Link to post

 

westbrook

11/23/05

 

with all this talk about dehydrators we need some recipes!

 

Zucchini Chips -Peel Zucchini, slice very thin, sprinkle with taco seasoning or ranch seasoning or garlic salt or any thing you like. Dry.

 

Apple Slices - Peel, seed and slice apples (dice them too) sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar. Dry. Eat as snacks or use in cakes and muffins.

 

 

************

 

 

Spider

11/23/05

 

I have never dehydrated anything... think I might have to buy a dehydrator now.

 

 

 

************

 

 

westbrook

11/23/05

 

Dog Training Treats

 

purchase beef liver (or any liver; chicken, rabbit, goat)

Spray with Pam

lay slices on the tray

Dry 12-18 hours depending on dehydrator

If liver is pliable, cut into bite size pieces with scissors and place in paper bag or open container for a couple of days to continue to dry.

If dried hard, break into bite size pieces or what ever you get and store in a continer.

 

Since I dry 20-40 pounds of liver at a time, I store it in giant plastic mayo containers (with lid on) and use by the pockets full for training.

 

 

************

 

 

Jo

11/23/05

 

 

Quote:

________________________________________

 

Apple Slices - Peel, seed and slice apples (dice them too) sprinkle with cinnamon and sugar. Dry. Eat as snacks or use in cakes and muffins.

________________________________________

 

 

Can you used dried apple slices in a pie, the same as fresh apples? (after soaking them or something?)

~Jo

 

 

************

 

 

Phatkat1956

11/23/05

 

Yea, they are better if soaked in apple juice. Apple pie isn't my favorite, but dried apple pies YUCK!

 

Dried Apple Pies

I loathe, abhor, detest, despise,

Abominate dried-apple pies.

I like good bread, I like good meat,

Or anything that's fit to eat;

But of all poor grub beneath the skies,

The poorest is dried apple pies.

Give me the toothache, or sore eyes,

But don't give me dried apple pies.

The farmer takes his gnarliest fruit

'Tis wormy, bitter, and hard, to boot;

He leaves the hulls to make us cough,

And don't take half the peeling off.

Then on a dirty cord 'tis strung

And in a garret window hung,

And there it serves as roost for flies,

Until it's made up into pies.

Tread on my corns, or tell me lies,

But don't pass me dried-apple pies.

---Unknown

 

 

 

************

 

 

westbrook

11/23/05

 

Here is a recipe I pulled up with a search...

 

Dried Apple Crumb Pie Recipe

Source: Preserving Fruits and Vegetables

 

Serves 6

 

You can have a dessert in an emergency if you keep one of these in the freezer.

 

 

Other necessary recipes:

Dried Apple Rings

 

 

RECIPE INGREDIENTS

 

For Filling:

 

12 oz dried apples

1 quart apple cider

3 tablespoons cornstarch

1/4 teaspoon ground nutmeg

1/3 cup sugar

9-inch shortcrust pastry pie shell

 

 

For Crumb Mixture:

 

1/2 cup sugar

3/4 cup all-purpose flour

1/3 cup butter

 

 

ice cream or whipped cream for garnish (optional)

 

 

 

RECIPE METHOD

 

Preheat the oven to 425 degrees.

 

TO MAKE FILLING: In a saucepan, simmer the dried apples in the cider until soft but not broken, about 30 minutes. Place the apples in a colander and drain, reserving 1/4 cup of the liquid. Allow the apples to cool before proceeding.

 

In a mixing bowl, combine the cornstarch, nutmeg, and sugar with the apples. Pout the reserved cooking liquid over the apple mixture and mix gently. Transfer the filling to a 9-inch unbaked pie shell or leave it off and spoon it directly into a buttered 9-inch pie dish.

 

TO MAKE CRUMB MIXTURE: In a food processor, combine the crumb mixture ingredients. Spoon the crumb mixture over the apple filling. The pie may be baked at this point, or frozen for up to 6 months. Bake the pie for about 1 hour, until golden brown. Serve with ice cream or whipped cream, as desired.

 

DO-AHEAD SUGGESTION: If you are freezing the pie, you can line the pie dish with foil and then, once frozen, you can slip the pie off the dish and re-use the dish. When you come to use the frozen pie, simply remove the foil and replace in the pie dish.

 

Nutrition Facts

 

Serves 6

Facts per Serving

Calories: 594 Fat: 18g Carbohydrates: 110g

Cholesterol: 28mg Sodium: 193mg Protein: 3g

Fiber: 6g % Cal. from Fat: 27% % Cal. from Carbs: 74%

 

 

 

************

 

 

Mother

11/28/05

 

I have four dehydators and use them a LOT. One of them can be used for making yogurt and sour cream when I want to make more than my two yogurt makers will hold.

 

The book, "Dry It, You'll Like It", by Gen MacManiman (1973)is wonderful but I'm not sure it's still in print. It's got recipes for dried cookies, crackers, and a ton more. It's even got directions for building your own dehydrator.

 

Here's one of my familie's favorites:

 

Jamie's Breakfast Cookies

 

Blend (in a blender on high speed) until smooth: 3/4th cup oil, 2/3rd cup honey, 3 or 4 large apples, unpeeled, cored and chopped, and 2 Tsp. vanilla or a small wedge of organic lemon. This is your cookie base.

 

Mix in: 3 cups rolled oats, 1 cup sunflower seed, 1 cup raisins or chopped dates. Stir well.

 

Let stand for 1/2 to 1 hour to allow the oats to soak up flavors.

 

Drop by spoonful onto parchment paper (wax paper does work too) and dry untl firm. One or two days depending on the texture you prefer. (That is if you just let them set on a counter to dry, I only dry these about a day in the dehydrator. Soft ones should be refrigerated probably to keep longest, dryer ones will keep without.)

 

Variations: Add 1/2 cup ground flax or sesame seeds; 1 cup of chopped nuts; different dried fruits, or add spices like coriander or cinnamon to cookie base.

 

Note: The versatile cooky base, above, makes a delicious and unusual fruit-salad topping. It also taste great all by itself, pudding -style, with maybe a few chopped nuts or crumbled sesame squares on top.

 

This recipe goes to show that you don't have to dry just plain fruit and veggies.

 

Here's a tip though. I buy mixed veggies when I find a really good buy on them and then dry them until crisp in my dehydrator. They store almost forever. I use them to put in soups, to reconstitute, to grind up into a powder for an instant soup base (this is good when you also add dried onion, garlic, peppers and spices or even some powdered bullion for a quick soup. Just add boiling water and let steep for a while) and my grand kids like to munch on them just as they are. Of course you can dehydrate any frozen veggies but I usually dry what I grow. It's just nice to have these all cut up in tiny pieces and already mixed together.

 

And how about "Tomato Figs" Is anyone interested in a recipe to dry sweetened small tomatoes? They really do taste like figs and the left over syrup is almost like molasses.

 

Basically, you cover small, peeled tomatoes(like grape or pear or small roma's) with dry brown sugar. (no water) About two pounds for four pounds of tomatoes, approx. start heating them on very low heat, lifting the tomatoes from time to time in the brown sugar until the brown sugar melts and the tomatoes float in the resulting syrup. Simmer them for an hour or two until the tomatoes start to look almost clear and like they have absorbed the syrup. Drain with a slotted spoon and place them on a glass plate or sheet of stiff plastic either in the sunshine (if you can keep the flies off them) or in a dehydrator. Now comes the sticky part.......turn them over at least twice a day and let them dry until they are almost dry to the touch ( but still a bit tacky or sticky). About three days in a dehydrtor, more in the sunshine. Sprinkle or dip them in powdered sugar and store between layers of waxed paper. They keep really well. The left over syrup is great over pancakes, in cookies and etc. It will keep about two months in the frig but If I have a lot of it, I can it by pouring it, boiling hot, into small jars, wipe the rims really well and cap with a hot cap. You can just turn the jar upside down for about a half hour to help it seal before turning it back and letting it cool. I've never had any of this spoil canned this way. If you are in doubt, just put the sealed jars in a hot water bath for about ten minutes.

 

Okay, now I'm ready for some more recipies from you all.

 

 

Can you tell I like to dehydrate things?

 

 

************

 

 

Mother

11/28/05

 

hey, forgot, I also put a recipe for Roasted Apple peel tea, made in a dehydrator, on the nature's prescriptions area....

 

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

dehydrating hamburger

 

MomHomeSchools4

03/20/06

 

Well I finnally took the plunge and dried some hamburger today. I had read about other people doing it, and it looked interesting so I figured why not.

 

First I cooked it like I would for taco meat or chili. After draining as well as possible I put it in my metal collinder and poured boiling water over it, trying to remove as much fat as possible. I let it sit and drain for a little while then put it in the dehydrator. On the bottom rack I put the fruit roll up tray to catch any tiny peices. It didn't take long to dry really. about 3-4 hours is all. Now I have a qt jar about 3/4 full of what used to be 2.5 pounds of hamburger! Now it looks like rat turds! Sorry, gross I know, but true.

Has anyone else ever done this, eaten it and lived? Guess I'll try it for supper tomorrow before doing any more.

 

 

 

************

 

 

Darlene

03/20/06

 

ROFL! You are too cute...

 

Nope, I'm not a big dehydrator girl...I am outta control with canning and can hamburger all the time...you'll hafta let us know how it reconstitutes...like you said, I've read here where others have done that too and said it's fine.

 

 

************

 

 

MomHomeSchools4

03/20/06

 

cute? me?

 

I have tried canning burger, but I didn't care for the texture. Maybe if I raw packed it instead?

 

I did manage to can about 25qts each of beef and pork cubes along with some extra pints of broth from both. I've been looking for a good deal on chicken to can next. Sam's wants $.79 a pound for whole chickens, who are they kidding!

 

I liked the idea of the dry burger because not only does it need no refridgeration, but its light if it has to be carried. Maybe I'll let hubby eat it first, then the next night the rest of us can taste it he has a stomach of iron anyway.

 

 

 

************

 

 

Darlene

03/20/06

 

 

Quote:

________________________________________

 

Maybe I'll let hubby eat it first, then the next night the rest of us can taste it he has a stomach of iron anyway.

________________________________________

 

 

ROFL!

 

You are SO naughty!

 

 

************

 

 

Safetylady

03/20/06

 

I use dehydrated burger all the time. I put it in chili or spaghetti. It rehydrates really well. I also use tvp all the time with the dehydrated burgeer. My food snob grandkids can't tell the difference. I usually put it in at the beginning of the cooking process.

 

 

************

 

 

MomHomeSchools4

03/21/06

 

Well I just made up a pot of chili using my rat turds, oh sorry, I mean dry burger. I have to say it cooks up wonderfully and I really can't tell that it was dried. I think this is the way we are going to store ground beef from now on. Much better than canning it IMHO. I thought the canned burger was, I don't know, "sand-y" in texture. But really I can't taste or feel any difference in this. WHOO HOOO

 

Please don't anybody tell me its bad to do this, cause I don't wanna hear it! LOL

 

 

************

 

 

Darlene

03/21/06

 

Well, I grind my own meat for hamburger so I control the grind and mine comes out NOT sand-y...so HA!

 

 

 

p.s. Oh, btw did I tell you what happened to the Smith's when they used dehydrated hamburger? Oh my gosh, you just wouldn't believe it..well see, what happened was Mrs. Smith.....oooops, forgot you didn't wanna know...oh well, you can't say I didn't warn ya!...

 

 

 

rofl

 

 

************

 

 

LivinSimple

05/15/06

 

Has anyone else tried dehydrating hamburger? I was looking for info on canning it but ran across this post. I like the idea of having things stored different ways. Sort of like not having all my eggs in one basket.

 

I'm interested in finding out if anyone else has any input on drying the hamburger.

 

 

 

************

 

 

waiting

06/03/06

 

Never tried drying hamburger before but trying to dry some today. Got about 5 more hours to go. Read a lot of posts about it and one on another site from a trail guide and took info from all. Instead of running hot water from faucet over it though, I did what the trail guide suggested and poured off the grease, then put water in pan and brought to a boil to get as much grease out of it as possible. Poured off the water and added more and brought to a boil again. Did this 3 times. (He called it "flashing".) Figured it would get out more grease since our water heater is set at 140 degrees and boiling it is 212. Don't know how all this will turn out, but it's cooking. Still don't have my dehydrating book yet but it should come in this week, hopefully.

Anyone know how you can really tell it's dry enough? Would hate to jar it and vacuum seal it and then have moisture bubbles on the inside of the jar. I guess if that happened it would be ok to put it back in the dryer to dry some more and then jar it again?

Link to post

Drying zucchini

 

Safetylady

08/01/05

 

I usually shred and dehydrate my excess zucchini. Dry until crisp. I just took a package out of the 5 gallon bucket I store baggies of vegetables in, rehydrated it, added one egg, 1/2 cup cottage cheese, 1/4 cup grated paremsan cheese, 1/2 cup flour, salt and pepper, a dash of hot sauce to zip it up and made fritters. I had about 2 cups rehydrated. Had no excess water to drain. Sauteed in hot skillet with 1 T olive oil and a small pat of butter. I do the same with carrots, beets, potatoes any hard winter vegetable. We had these with homemade salsa. They were really good. Also make the same type of fritter with spinach (fresh or frozen) just squeeze out moisture if frozen and add an extra 1/2 bread crumbs or cracker crumbs. Sometimes I dip in parmesan cheese and saute. Good with extra marinara sauce. If yu have children who are not veggie eaters, grind dried veggies until almost powder, add to meatballs, meatloaf, chili, soup, even muffins. Snuck so many veggies into grand children and they didn't even know it.

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

Dehydrating Potato's

 

Deblyn

09/17/05

 

Has anyone dehydrated potato's? I followed the directions in the Blue Book and more than 1/2 the potato's turned brown. Why???? I steam blanched them, rinsed and dehydrated.

 

 

************

 

 

goatherder

09/17/05

 

Did you soak them in a lemon juice and water solution after blanching? It sounds as if they oxidized. That is what usually turns fruits and veggies dark.

 

 

************

 

 

Deblyn

09/17/05

 

No, I didn't! It said to just rinse them with cold water after.....I will try the lemon juice water...how long should I soak them and how much lemon juice to water? Thanks!

 

 

************

 

 

westbrook

09/17/05

 

Since we don't have hard ground freeze here, potatos can stay in the ground until we are ready to use.

 

A cool, dark place also will keep potatos for a very long time. if they start to spout.. plant them!

 

 

************

 

 

goatherder

09/17/05

 

Blanch for 5 minutes then soak in a mixture of 1/2 cup lemon juice to 2 quarts cold water. Then dry as usual.

 

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

Preparing dried vegetables

 

Lois

03/27/06

 

I have made meat loaf with dried onions, green peppers and celery. It comes out well if you put the veg flakes in hot water and reconstitute before adding to meat.

Just remember that dried vegetables are basically raw and must be cooked to tenderize them.

 

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

Question Re: Dehydrating Lemons

 

Deblyn

06/07/06

 

I was wondering if you have dehydrated lemons? I read in a book about dehydrating the lemon and grinding it into powder to use in recipes. Do you dehydrate the entire lemon or only the lemon peel????????

 

 

 

************

 

 

Magpie

06/07/06

 

Well, I usually dry the peels (great to toss into tea mixes!) and when I want to preserve the lemon itself... not so much with the drying. Candying, stored in vinegar, and frozen for me. But I'd be intrigued to hear how it works out for you if you do go the whole lemon route.

 

 

************

 

 

Cat

06/07/06

 

The things I learn from you all... both in the asking *and* the finding!!

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Drying lemons

 

How do I dehydrate whole fruits, i.e. whole lemons?

 

Jay

 

 

 

Whole lemons are easy to dehydrate, although, obviously you must slice the whole lemon in order to dehydrate it. I buy them whenever I can get a good deal, then dehydrate them and make a great lemon powder that I use in a huge variety of recipes, from baked goods to Chinese food.

 

Wash the lemons with hot water to remove any insect spray or other noxious chemicals. Pat them dry, then slice about a quarter of an inch thick. Remove and discard any seeds from the lemon rounds and place the rounds in a single layer on a dehydrator screen or on a cookie sheet, if you don’t have a dehydrator. Dehydrate at about 145° F until they are dry. The oven of your gas kitchen range, with only a pilot light on, will dry your cookie sheet trays of lemons. Or you can leave them in the backseat of your car on a warm, sunny day. They dry quickly.

 

Once they are dry, the pulp is crispy and the rind tough and leathery. What I do is whiz them in the old blender that I got at the dump, until the whole lemon is a granular powder. This is excellent in pies, all baked goods, and a ton of other recipes. It is very lemony in fragrance and taste.

 

— Jackie

 

http://www.backwoodshome.com/advice/aj92.html

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

Looks like the whole thing, then powder.

 

 

************

 

 

Deblyn

06/07/06

 

Thank you! I am going to try it today with the whole lemon and see how it turns out! This will be the second thing I try with my new dehydrator. I will let you know how it does!

 

 

************

 

 

MomHomeSchools4

06/07/06

 

could this be used for lemonade?

 

 

 

************

 

 

westbrook

06/07/06

 

don't waste your time! because...

 

http://www.truelemon.com/cooking.html

 

this is awesome stuff! send me your addy (snail mail) and I will drop a couple packets in the mail... try it yourself.

 

I found it at albertsons. ... now I want the lime!

 

 

************

 

 

Deblyn

06/07/06

 

Westbrook, you are right, the True Lemon is good! I have some...and I too want to try the lime. I was given some lemons and I thought it would be fun to try and save for dessert recipes, etc that call for it. True Lemon can be expensive, although I just bought a box for .50 cents due to a sale and a coupon!

 

 

************

 

 

westbrook

06/08/06

 

how about canning lemons!

 

http://www.pickyourown.org/canningcitrus.php

 

 

************

 

 

Deblyn

06/08/06

 

Wow, I never thought about canning the lemons. I will have to try that sometime.

 

I did dehydrate the lemons and ground it into a powder. It seemed to work well. I tried the lemonade, but I think I put too much powder in it. I will have to try again. I put it away for now to save for recipes that call for lemon rind, etc.

 

 

************

 

 

Pansy

06/08/06

 

I'm with Westie - True Lemon and True Lime are wonderful! Canning the Lemons sounds absolutely wonderful, wonder if I could get DH to do this? He (as I have previously said, got burned on Y2K and doesn't want to "get carried away") Anyhow very interesting and I added the Citrus site to the favorites (boy is that getting long....)

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

Slicing Foods To Dehydrate

 

waiting

05/26/06

 

Do any of you use special equipment to slice your food to a consistant width for even dehydrating? Any tips?

 

 

************

 

 

Darlene

05/26/06

 

Yes, I use a special piece of equipment called a Mandoline...it keeps everything uniform.

 

 

************

 

 

waiting

05/26/06

 

Mandoline. Sounds like some Chinese torture device.

I'll go check them out. Thanks.

 

 

************

 

 

westbrook

05/26/06

 

I freeze my meat first and then use a meat slicer. I have a restaurant model and a hand crank model.

 

Wal-Mart carries a Rival electric for $70.00 or less

 

 

 

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

 

 

 

 

Link to post

I gave my dehydrator away last year thinking it wasn't that useful...argh!!!!

 

Now I'll have to go get me another one. I never thought about all of the different things I could dry with it. I only did the bananas and apples and that gets old after awhile.

 

THIS IS A GREAT THREAD!!!!

 

Have a Blessed Day,

B.B.

Link to post

I'm going to try and make some of doubleought's beef jerky this week end. I got some thin sliced beef the other week and wondered what I could use it for. Thanks for the ideas!

 

Q

Link to post

I am such a lucky girl! Not only did I get a pressure canner, DH also got me a new dehydrator! Did I mention that I'm married to the most wonderful man in the world?

 

I have made several batches of beef jerky with extra lean ground beef and the Nesco jerky seasining packets. It gets eaten up almost as fast as I can make it!

 

I also made dried bananas with no pre-treatment. They werent as pretty as store bought, but that didn't stop us from eating them up. I think I'll make some more this weekend with a lemon juice dip first, just to compare.

Link to post

Okay, DH is stealing pieces of jerky out of the dehydrator! Just the ones that are done. I can see right now I am going to have to make a lot more of this. It is really good!!

 

Q

Link to post

LOL!! I bagged mine up and dropped an oxygen absorber in it, but I don't think it is going to last long enough to have needed one. The guys are circling like buzzards at a fresh kill. It is very good though and I am glad I took the time out of my day to learn a new skill.

 

Q

Link to post

First off Cricket I am married to the most wonderful man in the world - 14th will be 54 years with him - he is the greatest. NOW, if you haven't tried drying your own Pineapple, you really must find time to do that. If fresh Pineapple is too expensive (and what isn't in the fruit line these days?) you can buy the unsweetened canned and just lay the slices on dryer trays - takes a bit longer as it is cut thicker than I cut the fresh but it is absolutely OUTSTANDING! You probably need to do it when the family is not home....also I never treat Bananas and as you say they aren't as pretty but they also are not dipped in whatever sweetener the store uses either! Have fun. Strawberries are also great and the leather from any of the fruits with about a tablespoon of honey to a blender full of fruit is excellent - our kids loved it when they were at home.

Link to post

Oh well geeze. I have a couple of bananas on the table I was wondering what to do with before they go bad. Now I'm going to have to fire up the dehydrator again. Pansy, I will give the pineapple a try too. It sounds great!!

 

Q

Link to post

I hadn't heard of the True Lemon and True Lime stuff - I'm going to have to look for them at the store, I love having a bit of lemon or lime in my water, but hate having to carry around the little bottle at work!

 

I'm not allowed to buy anything else until after I move, else I'd be buying this.

 

 

Link to post

True Lemon and True Lime are excellent! I love the Lemon in the bottled water and carry a ziplock snack bag in my purse with them - they have a web site also with some very good recipes. I just sprinkle it on fish when we have it as though it were fresh Lemon and honestly you really can't tell the difference. That reminds me I need to re-check their site - see ya!

Link to post
  • 6 months later...

You can use your convection oven but it will be expensive to run.

Walmart has some good basic dehydrators. The American Harvest/Nesco is usually good to start with. I suggest the 500 watt ones. Need a dehydrator with a good fan and heat source.

Otherwise it will take forever to dry and some things can mold or spoil before they dry. I have two of the American Harvest 500 watt dryers. I even bought several for gifts.

 

Link to post
  • 9 months later...

OK everyone, I'm gonna get my Excaliber Dehydrator out of storage at my stbx's and start dehydrating I don't know why it wasn't my first thought, since I am LOOKING AT PURCHASING DEHYDRATED EVERYTHING!!!! Thanks to you, I have pleanty of ideas to start with. now the only problem will be finding a place to put it in my tiny tiny house. In my old place it held court on the counter in my kitchen at all times (I ran a gourmet dog food business but it didn't do well so I closed it). Oh yes, now that I have that covered, it's def. time to get that food sealer!! Can't put it off any longer.

You are all soooo wonderful and helpful!!

Link to post
  • 2 months later...

I've recently purchased a dehydrator for my mom, and I have a question I just know one of your ladies or guys have the answer to. I have excess squash that my mom has dehydrated. How is the bet way to store it, and when are the oxygen absorbers used?

Thanks for any help you can give.

Sandy

Link to post
  • 6 months later...

Back to the top. Great tips for those new to dehydrating. I did the zuchinni chips last summer. Good stuff, low fat replacement for store bought potato chips (unless you don't like taste of zuchinni). :D

Link to post

Wash potatoes well, peel if desired. Cut as desired; french-fry style in 1/4 “ pieces, or 1/4-1/8” slices, or grate.

 

Steam blanch 4-6 minutes, then rinse well in cool water (may turn black during drying if not properly pretreated).

 

I've decided I really don't like processing potatoes. I decided to dehydrate some, and my dehydrator's booklet said 3/8ths of an inch thick. My mandolin only went to 7mm (1/4th) so I used that, but they seemed rather thick for dehydrating. Then the booklet said to steam blanch 5 min or until transparent. After 5 min they were nowhere near transparent, so I blanched and blanched and blanched some more until they were. The Husband said I should have stopped at 5 min, as he thought it was one or the other; I thought it was at least 5 min, more if that's what it takes to get them transparent. Which was it? And I realized I didn't cool them down before putting them in the dehydrator.

 

I put them in a lemon juice water bathe as I sliced them, but some are still turning dark.

 

Add this to my potato peeling disaster for canning, and I don't want to do potatoes anymore! :*(

Link to post
  • 2 years later...

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.