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Making No-Knead Bread


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I have high speed access, but I rarely click on youtube links - dunno why, just don't typically do it.

 

For years, I've made no-knead dinner rolls, which have been a staple for us. They are great when I don't have time to make bread.

 

Here's my recipe:

 

3/4 cup milk, warmed to 95 degrees F

4 tablespoons butter, melted

2 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/4 ounce dry yeast

1/2 cup warm water (110-115 degrees F)

2 + cups whole wheat flour

1 cup rolled oats

1 egg

1/2 cup chopped pecans

 

Combine the milk, butter, sugar and salt, warmed to 95 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast in the warm water, stir to dissolve. Add to the milk mixture. Add balance of ingredients. Stir well. Stir in more flour as needed until batter is stiff. Cover and let rise in a warm place until double in size, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Generously butter muffin pan. Stir down batter. Spoon batter into muffin cups, filling 2/3 full. Let rise, uncovered, in a warm place until nearly double in size (about 20-25 minutes). Bake in a pre-heated oven, 375 degrees F, until done (sound hollow when tapped), about 18 to 20 minutes in my oven. Brush with melted butter if desired. Remove to wire rack.

 

Sometimes I add cinnamon and sugar to these, which goes over very big around here!

 

These are wonderful hot or reheated.

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  • 2 months later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Heres the recipe for those that want it. I have made it a few time, but I am having trouble, as I always do, with using my stone ground red wheat flour and having my loaf stay soft after it cools.I end up with little bricks. Dose anyone have any ideas ( I don't want to add white flour or vital gluten)

 

e: No-Knead Bread

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REPRINTS

 

Published: November 8, 2006

Adapted from Jim Lahey, Sullivan Street Bakery

Time: About 1½ hours plus 14 to 20 hours’ rising

 

Related

The Minimalist: The Secret of Great Bread: Let Time Do the Work (November 8, 2006)

 

Readers’ Opinions

Forum: Cooking and Recipes

3 cups all-purpose or bread flour, more for dusting

¼ teaspoon instant yeast

1¼ teaspoons salt

Cornmeal or wheat bran as needed.

 

1. In a large bowl combine flour, yeast and salt. Add 1 5/8 cups water, and stir until blended; dough will be shaggy and sticky. Cover bowl with plastic wrap. Let dough rest at least 12 hours, preferably about 18, at warm room temperature, about 70 degrees.

 

2. Dough is ready when its surface is dotted with bubbles. Lightly flour a work surface and place dough on it; sprinkle it with a little more flour and fold it over on itself once or twice. Cover loosely with plastic wrap and let rest about 15 minutes.

 

3. Using just enough flour to keep dough from sticking to work surface or to your fingers, gently and quickly shape dough into a ball. Generously coat a cotton towel (not terry cloth) with flour, wheat bran or cornmeal; put dough seam side down on towel and dust with more flour, bran or cornmeal. Cover with another cotton towel and let rise for about 2 hours. When it is ready, dough will be more than double in size and will not readily spring back when poked with a finger.

 

4. At least a half-hour before dough is ready, heat oven to 450 degrees. Put a 6- to 8-quart heavy covered pot (cast iron, enamel, Pyrex or ceramic) in oven as it heats. When dough is ready, carefully remove pot from oven. Slide your hand under towel and turn dough over into pot, seam side up; it may look like a mess, but that is O.K. Shake pan once or twice if dough is unevenly distributed; it will straighten out as it bakes. Cover with lid and bake 30 minutes, then remove lid and bake another 15 to 30 minutes, until loaf is beautifully browned. Cool on a rack.

 

Yield: One 1½-pound loaf.

 

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  • 1 month later...

I have been making this bread and my family loves it. I love it because it is so easy! I have been making regular bread for a few months now but not as often as I would like due to the work involved. This bread takes only a couple of minutes for me to mix and it only uses 1/4 tsp of yeast! The waiting time for rising is long but it hasn't been an issue if I plan ahead.

The crust ends up being very crunchy and the inside very moist. YUMMY!

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Originally Posted By: Cowgirl
I have high speed access, but I rarely click on youtube links - dunno why, just don't typically do it.

For years, I've made no-knead dinner rolls, which have been a staple for us. They are great when I don't have time to make bread.

Here's my recipe:

3/4 cup milk, warmed to 95 degrees F
4 tablespoons butter, melted
2 tablespoons sugar
1/2 teaspoon salt
1/4 ounce dry yeast
1/2 cup warm water (110-115 degrees F)
2 + cups whole wheat flour
1 cup rolled oats
1 egg
1/2 cup chopped pecans

Combine the milk, butter, sugar and salt, warmed to 95 degrees F. Sprinkle yeast in the warm water, stir to dissolve. Add to the milk mixture. Add balance of ingredients. Stir well. Stir in more flour as needed until batter is stiff. Cover and let rise in a warm place until double in size, about 1 to 1 1/2 hours. Generously butter muffin pan. Stir down batter. Spoon batter into muffin cups, filling 2/3 full. Let rise, uncovered, in a warm place until nearly double in size (about 20-25 minutes). Bake in a pre-heated oven, 375 degrees F, until done (sound hollow when tapped), about 18 to 20 minutes in my oven. Brush with melted butter if desired. Remove to wire rack.

Sometimes I add cinnamon and sugar to these, which goes over very big around here!

These are wonderful hot or reheated.


These sound great! Thanks for sharing. smile
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  • 2 years later...

I have made this bread for several years now and it is a no brainer. I make a round loaf in a cast iron pot and I bought the long clay baker for the long french type loaf. I bought the proofing baskets with the liners also.

If you go to Breadtopia they have videos and they have all kinds of baking supplies and they have a Danish wire wisk that is the best thing in the world. The wire is thick and you can stir your dough with it with no trouble.

Also I find that the smaller the pot the better your loaf will rise----

It is a fun bread to make and it turns out pretty and your friends will not believe you made it-------

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