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CrabGrassAcres

Feeding one person for a year $112.35

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Cowgirl, right on. My mom says the ONLY way to survive is to have the best garden you can afford and to can what you aren't eating for dinner that night. Both of my parents went through the Depression. My father was a city kid, my mother a country kid. My mother says they had a cow ,a horse, and chickens and a pig and a large garden although they did rent their place. She says Grandma bartered for bushels of peaches. Two of her older brothers worked at a local farm in exchange for produce which my Grandma canned. They were able to do okay and nobody starved. All the kids had jobs. They all contributed to paying for the heat each winter.

My Dad told stories of having to dig though the bakery dumpsters where old bread and cakes were stacked to take to a local pig farm. He and his brothers would be very excited if they found a decent cake in that pile. He says they saved bottles for refunds. They ran numbers and messages for the mob for nickels because the mob was the only group who had any cash in that Italian neighborhood. They crawled into abandoned mill buildings to find old pipes to turn in for scrap metal and get a few dimes that way. They saved and scavenged every single can they could for the same reason. They haunted the edges of the railroad tracks to pick up pieces of coal that fell off the trains. They often went hungry. My grandmother got post-partum depression around this time and my father and his sister and brothers were taken by the state and put in an orphanage for about six months. Grandpa visited them every day and the place let him eat dinner there with the kids. My Dad would make him take home the rolls and butter for his mom. Grandpa often pocketed his meat to bring home.

 

People survived on very little. We don't need the big meals we often eat today. Pancake suppers were a frequent ocurrance at my house--a holdover, my mother said, from the Depression times when they had them for Sunday nights.

 

Mom says they got moth-holed sweaters from the thrift shop, unraveled them and knit them into mittens. They went out into the woods and scavenged enough butternuts (sometimes called "pig nuts" in New England) to make fudge at Christmas. They gathered bayberries to make their own scented Christmas candles. Gifts were home made. Pennies were saved. Grandma had a cast iron dime bank that when full held $10. That was a small fortune to them.

 

Big buckets of soup and home made bread would be dinner for a few days. Meat was scarce until my mom's brothers took up bow hunting. Lessons learned--make do with what you have--but if possible live in the country where you can make do with a little more.

 

Today, many people would be at a loss. We won't be worried about modified this or that or organic whatever when we are because of necessity, growing our stuff at home. For practice, I am doing it now so I get the hang of it.

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Hello Ive got me a real corn grinder had to order it through the mail.Making masa is such a big job this would be so much to do in a emergency?I got my batch of corn soaked and cooked and milled.I feel the masa is a little different than what Ive seen in some pictures mine is wet and clumpy.In the pictures it seems to be more like flour .Has anyone made masa from scratch with yellow corn from the feed store.What if water is limited all the rinsing and cleaning of the corn and time would be interesting challenge.I plan on getting better at this task and getting all the bugs out of the system .I would love to do the cooking on a fire soon.Any masa cookers around............

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I don't know if I am understanding your correctly.

 

"Masa" is Spanish for "dough". Usually it refers to cornmeal dough, I think. Although I didn't study much Spanish (dummy that I was I studied German for SIX YEARS and I never have had occasion to need it!!!!!).

 

Do you mean cornmeal? It can take three trips through the grinder to get cornmeal of a size I like, more if you want it really fine. Start really coarse the first run through. Get finer each time you go through. Not all grain mills are created equal, so whether yours will grind it as fine as you would like is an unknown. What brand did you get?

 

It will also grind easier if you "parch" it first. There's a thread around here on parching corn somewhere. Heck, maybe this thread - the thing has taken on a life of its own! LOL!

 

As for water needs, that is why you need to have lots of water stored, and a plan on how to get more.

 

 

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sounds like you have some experience great.....My corn grinder is called molina-nixtamal.I guess masa is called nixtamal The stuff I am doing is soaked with slaked lime and cooked then grounded while wet.

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Well, I can't help you. I have never tried to grind wet corn. I grind dry corn just fine, though.

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Masa is the paste or dough made from freshly ground wet hominy. You can run it through the mill a second time if you like. Masa Harina is a brand name for dry hominy flour.

 

 

If water is in short supply, the rinse water can be run through a sieve to catch the hulls and used for washing dishes. Indigenous peoples who use a lot of masa will keep a pot of corn soaking almost continuously, replenishing the pot with corn, water and lye or lime as needed.

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what makes the best tortillas wet or dry?To make the dry masa would you soak with lime grind the wet corn then dry it or dry the corn before you grind it?Im really pulled to this for some reason I believe the indigenous people are the ones to learn from where could I find the info about the corn soaking continuously they must of mastered the whole process..... its so much time prep.it was obviously worth it and saved their health.thanks again for your help

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The masa harina from the store is a bit stale but that is the only dry masa I've tried. You might want to dry some of your grains and decide how you would prefer doing it. It would probably be easier to dry the corn before grinding if you were planning to keep it a while. It is a lot of time prep but it makes a big difference in the nutrition.

 

I only saw a passing reference to the continuous soak with no details.

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It is common in famine areas to augment rice portions with plant oil. The LDS church has a starvation recipe they use in africa. Shortening is extremely valuable - I understand it was the mechanism for barter in germany during the second world war.

 

I keep a lot of crisco in my pantry. Lot of uses, shelf stable and dense. For health reasons, I prefer olive oil, but the latter doesn't keep as well. One of the things I have done is to replace my large containers with multiple smaller ones. Food is a barter item and its nice to have small change, and not just hundred dollar bills.

 

It is odd that the same foods I avoid for heath reasons in good times are the ones I'd choose in bad times.

 

Minute rice has no fiber - but it will rapidly "cook" even in cold water. This granola bar says "only 200 calories". Maybe nice if you're on a diet, but in hard times I want the one that says "over 400 calories." Same with cooking oils. The same things that make them "bad" for you, versus olive and canola, are what help them keep shelf stable for ten years.

 

 

 

 

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I keep a lot of crisco in my pantry. Lot of uses, shelf stable and dense...

 

It is odd that the same foods I avoid for heath reasons in good times are the ones I'd choose in bad times.

 

 

I'm with you on that one, Gunplumber. Note that the new formulation of Crisco, without "trans fats" is less shelf stable than the Crisco we know and love. When the new version came out, I raided the Walmart shelves and scooped up several cans of the original formulation in both the original and butter flavor.

 

I consider that somewhat of a coup. :nail:

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This is a fantastic thread, so glad it has been resurfaced! :)

 

I agree about the Crisco. I can also use it in making my biscuits instead of butter, and butter (unless you buy the shelf stable and expensive stuff) has to be kept cool.

 

The way I'm trying to compensate for the health issues is MODERATION ( a hard state to achieve).

 

I'm also starting to stock up on old fashioned Lard as an alternative.

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Rechecking prices

 

Pinto beans 50# $24.86 now 25.43 Jan 19 2008

Field corn #50 8.50 6.50

Shortening 18.68 22.49

 

So while corn has gone up, beans and shortning are actually less.

 

Buy one container liq shortening $18.68, 2 bags of beans $49.72, 6 bags of corn $51.00, Total 119.40 .

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you'll also need the pot, fuel, and water to cook it. How many cords of wood to boil a pot of water every day?

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I assume that most people are going to have pots already. You do need a grinder, like a corona. You should try to get a pressure cooker if fuel is a problem. If you heat with wood, just cook on the heating stove. Otherwise, you can use twigs or even a solar cooker.

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This will supply nearly 2,000 calories/day for one year with adequate protein and fat. If you know what wild foods to forage for greens or can grow a small patch of greens, you can provide vitamins at no additional cost. You will also need salt and will want some other seasonings. You may be able to grow or forage for fruits, nuts, peppers etc.

 

This is prob one of the more boring diets in existence, but my mother told me this is the diet that kept her family alive through the depression and WWII. They did have a garden and grew lots of collards.

 

1. Pinto beans, 50 pounds at Sams Club for 25.43 1500 cal/pound = 75,000

2. Field corn, 50 pounds at Feed Store for 6.50 1500 cal/pound = 75,000

3. Bakers liquid shortening 35 # at Sam's 22.49 3500 cal/pound = 122,500 calories

 

Buy one container liq shortening $22.49, 2 bags of beans $50.86, 6 bags of corn $39.00, Total 112.35

 

Trish, if I vac seal these in individual packs from 1 to 5 lbs, then store them in mylar sacks in 6 gal buckets (well, the corn and beans anyway), about how long might they keep assuming the seals held and the buckets were stored in a cool, dry place? And how would one store the shortening and how long would it keep? We don't use a lot of this on a daily basis and DH is now on a 6 week program to lose his middle aged middle and that's a protein specific diet - no beans/carbs, etc.

 

We've got a good supply of sprout seeds now, too, sealed in mylar bags.

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Alexis, just use the mylar in the bucket. You don't need to do the extra work or expense of making smaller bags too. Do get the O2 absorbers and put them in the buckets. Should be good for 20-30 yrs if you start with fresh beans and corn.

 

The shortening doesn't last as long and should be rotated every yr or two if at all possible unless stored in a freezer. If kept frozen it can be kept a good 10 yrs or so. If it accidentally gets thawed it can be refrozen with no problem.

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WOW! Have you seen the number of view on this thread? Awesome!

 

 

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It isn't a dumb question at all.

I had to go back and look at my post, and it was a bit ambiguous.

I meant to use a pressure cooker on a regular stove if you are conserving fuel or to cook with a regular pot in a solar cooker. I can't see that it would be easy to keep a pressure cooker regulated in a solar oven. I always treated the solar oven like a slow cooker.

 

 

Is it advisable to solar cook in a pressure cooker? Sorry if this is a dumb question.
Edited by CrabGrassAcres

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The shortening doesn't last as long and should be rotated every yr or two if at all possible unless stored in a freezer. If kept frozen it can be kept a good 10 yrs or so. If it accidentally gets thawed it can be refrozen with no problem.

 

I had no idea you could freeze shortening to extend it's life. I had stopped buying it because we weren't using it up fast enough.

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I keep coming back to this post. But can someone please tell me at least three things I can do with field corn, bakers liquid shortening and pinto beans ONLY. I know I can add wild vegetatiOn and hunt for fresh meat.

 

But, please, as a favor to me, what can I make with ONLY those three ingredients. Either all three together or two or one. Thank you.

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I keep coming back to this post. But can someone please tell me at least three things I can do with field corn, bakers liquid shortening and pinto beans ONLY. I know I can add wild vegetatiOn and hunt for fresh meat.

 

But, please, as a favor to me, what can I make with ONLY those three ingredients. Either all three together or two or one. Thank you.

Beans and corn bread. My mother grew up eating mostly beans and cornbread with greens.

Pinole.

Corn nuts.

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Just wanted to add this http://www.provident-living-today.com/Bulk-Food-Storage.html

 

One Year Supply For 1 Adult

Mormon Food Storage

 

This list is a guideline for storing the bare minimum. The picture below shows you how much food you’ll get to eat everyday if you follow this guideline. And this is all you’ll get to eat. That is why I call it survival rations. You will stay alive, but eating probably won’t still be your favorite pastime.

 

You get 1 cup Wheat, 1 cup Oatmeal, 1/2 cup Rice, 1/3 cup beans, 2 Tbs Oil, 1 glass Milk (2 T powdered milk), 1/3 cup honey, and 2 tsp salt per day. Your daily menu might look something like this:

 

Breakfast: Hot oatmeal with honey & milk

Lunch: Tortillas and Sprouted Wheat

Dinner: Rice and Beans

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