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Fortifications:Securing the home

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This is a series we plan to develop dealing with securing the home. Some things will be lower budget as well as pointing higher budget items people employ to make their homes more secure.

 

No place is foolproof, but you can do a lot to enhance your home security. From the low budget such as Locks, wood blocks and bar inserts for a sliding glass door. Extra add-on locks for windows and and chains for the front door to full scale alarm systems and motion detectors.

 

If you've had luck with some styles of security, make suggestions. If you have ideas or questions, voice them.

 

Guard dogs, bells hanging on doorknobs. What works for you, what are you interested in.

 

 

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http://www.hometips.com/cs-protected/guide...r_security.html

 

Snip...

 

Keeping would-be intruders outside is an important concern for most homeowners. Though hinged doors are relatively easy to protect with proper latches and deadbolts, windows and sliding glass doors are not as simple to secure. Windows and doors that slide can be forced open or lifted off their tracks, and glazing can be broken.

 

In addition to installing locking devices, you can enhance security by replacing all ordinary glass with tempered, laminated, or wire-reinforced glass or with plastic, as well as by installing perimeter alarm systems.

 

Several ready-made devices are available to make prying open a window and/or removing a sliding glass door from its track more difficult. The right locking device to choose will depend on whether you need to secure a sliding window or door, or a double-hung window.

 

To keep a panel from sliding, use track grips, tightened by a thumbscrew or key, or metal stops that straddle the lower track and are secured with a lever or thumbscrew that clamps them in place. Or use a spring bolt, which is screwed to the sill or base track and has a pin that snaps through a hole drilled into the edge of the lower track and bottom of the sash. Even more secure is a bar that screws to the doorjamb and swings up into a saddle on the edge of the door to lock it in place; an advantage of this type of bar is that it can be adjusted to allow the door to be partially open.The easiest way to keep an inside panel from sliding is to drop a dowel or a piece of tubing into the empty portion of the lower track. Cut it 1/4 inch shorter than the distance between the panel and the jamb.

 

Double-hung windows can be locked with wedge locks, key-operated latches, or locking pins that go through one sash and into the next.

 

(At the bottom of the article it show pictures of different window locking devices.)

 

 

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We have two sliding glass doors..both which have the "stick in the door" to keep them secure..or maybe not so secure. shrug

This could be used instead...

 

http://www.goodbarsecurity.com/Products/Patio_Door_Bars.asp

 

http://www.acehardware.com/sm-patio-door--...81.1255035.html

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Sliding-window-lock.jpg

 

From the Images DogMom suggested, These little metal clips work great if your leaving a window slightly open for ventilation.

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They say pictures can speak a thousand words.

 

 

titlephoto.jpg

 

 

car_keys_large.jpg

 

snip:Detective Constable Ian Connelly is part of the team cracking down on the criminals. He said: “Since November there have been a number of homes broken into primarily for the car keys. During the hours of darkness, the thieves are breaking or sneaking into homes which tend to have a high value car sitting in the drive. They steal the keys and then steal the car.

 

home-break-in-1.jpg

 

break.jpg

 

break2,0.jpg

 

Did I scare Ya? I hope so...if only to think.

Doing this series has pointed out my gaps I have to fill. So we're all learning together.

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We've added more to the windows/sliding glass door/ doors/garge series...

keep checking back as we update and find more ideas or PLEASE through in some of your own.

 

yeahthat

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http://www.clearpanelshutters.com/

storm-shutters-300px.jpg

Our stock sizes and prices: (All panels are 14.25" wide.)

33” $ 16.50

45” $ 22.50

57” $ 28.50

70” $ 35.00

88” $ 44.00

102” $ 51.00

240” $120.00

--

Our Clear GE Lexan Panels are: Florida Building Code Approved # 6416 & 6417

http://www.clearpanelshutters.com/faq.html http://www.clearpanelshutters.com/document...ingNo06-307.pdf

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The clear shutters look so much better than iron bars. I just wondered how you would get out in case of a fire?

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I'm betting a crow bar or flat bar hanging on the inside would be in order, or something that would quickly penetrate the plastic on at least the bottom edge so you could climb out?

Edited by The WE2's

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If you click on the pdf file number 15 says something about a hurri-out egress panels allowing for the possibility of removing the panels from the inside...results may vary....

I don't know a lot about hurricane shutters but it doesn't sound smart to put something on your windows that you can't get off quickly.... :scratchhead:

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Why not a window laminate? They do come extremely tough nowdays, can be made practically unbreakable and window remain clear. Google security window laminates, or shatterproof laminates for more info. Some of them looked very promising

Edited by kappydell

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Speaking of doors...in most of the books and magazines I've read, swap out the short 1-inch-ish screws securing the door to the house with 3-4 inch screws. As the small screws only secure to the door to the door frame while the 3-4 inch ones secure it to the stud behind the frame. Also, choose solid-core doors not hollow-core doors and don't forget the door to the attached garage, if you have one.

Edited by Cecilia

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Good points, Cecilia! My neighbor-friend called this week. Their alarm company notified her..."Your alarm is going off!!" So friend wanted me to drive by. My first response: "HAVE YOU CALLED SHERIFF?" Yes.... alarm company did...

 

So I did a drive-by. Then I went up the driveway of the vacant house next door to get a good look at the back door and all vehicles parked were theirs.

 

These dear folks have had 2 break-ins since we've all been up here. There was a real thieves ring going up here at one time. So she was understandably undone to think it might be happening again. :sassing: They've done a LOT of improving on their doors and such, including those really long screws and changing to solid doors.

 

Anyway, I was able to report that all looked ok. "....and btw, I see the sheriff dept vehicle zooming around the corner on their way to your place now!" Turned out to be the delivery guy dropped a box and it fell against the sliding glass door. They found the box leaning so figured that could certainly set off the alarm. Delivery guys can be so precise and gentle, y'know. :grinning-smiley-044:

 

 

MtRider :darth duck:

Edited by Mt_Rider

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Always consider the difference between locks and bolts on the outside and locks and bolts on the inside. One makes a shelter, but one makes a cage.

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Well said, Ambergris! The difference is so important when needing a quick exit in fire or earthquake or after the rubble of a tornado or......

 

MtRider :thumbs:

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