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Fortification Series: The Garage Door (Manual/Auto)

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Without a doubt, Garage doors can be very vunerable whether you have a manual that can be pulled off track or jacked up or an automatic whose code can be stolen, increasing your security awareness is important.

 

I do not want these guys coming by my house:

 

Security-Tips1.jpg

 

Tricks crooks use:

Corner-Pulling when criminals pull out on one of the bottom corners of an older style swingout garage door enough to gain entry

 

Code-Grabbing - when criminals duplicate the signal codes transmitted by fixed code garage door opener (GDO) remote controls to automatically open the door

 

Release-Grabbing - when criminals disengage garage doors from the GDOs by hooking and pulling (from outside the garage) the GDO's emergency release-lever, or cord attached to it, and manually open the door

 

Back-Driving - when criminals force the garage door towards the open position, to drive the GDO motor backwards and open the door

 

Fortunately, There are many styles of locking mechanisms and tricks to protect your automatic codes.

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Security for electric garage doors

Code Grabber devices can grant intruders instant access to your garage.

 

An automatic garage door opener is a terrific convenience and gives a certain sense of security as well. But modern technology has turned another convenience into a potential security risk!

 

When you last pushed the button on your remote control, who would've thought that you made it possible for an intruder to grab your frequency code with a device referred to in the industry as a Code Grabber? This electronic device stores the code and creates a golden opportunity for a thief to enter your home once you've left.

 

To stop this problem from happening, make sure that you purchase a garage door opener with rolling security codes instead of a fixed code.

 

Rolling code systems automatically change the code each time you operate your garage door. The code is selected from billions of combinations making it impossible for Code Grabbers to capture your security code in their memory.

 

For existing garage openers, you may be able to purchase an add-on device called a Code Encryptor. This device also code hops to billions of different codes stored in its memory and interfaces with most electric garage door openers.

 

If you have an older garage door opener (without rolling security codes) one way to assure that a thief won't enter while your on vacation is to unplug the unit.

 

Less sophisticated thieves can also trigger overhead garage doors if the openers have been left on the factory settings. Make sure when you purchase your electric garage door unit that you change the settings on both the garage door opener and remote.

 

To do this you must open your remote control, there'll be a series of switches inside. Change a couple of the settings making sure that you transfer these settings on the receiver as well to ensure that the garage door will open and close.

 

This procedure should always be done when purchasing a new home as well, as you never know who might have a remote to your electric garage door opener.

 

For years, garage remotes have been large and cumbersome. Because of this they are quite often left in the vehicle, usually on the visor in full view, creating an open invitation for a thief to take advantage of an opportunity.

 

Don't let this happen to you, purchase remotes that are smaller than a book of matches and small enough to place on a key chain. This way, you will be assured of having the remote with you at all times. You wouldn't leave your house keys on the seat of your car, so why leave your garage door remote on your visor?

 

Another security feature is a remote/receiver, perhaps installed in a bedroom, that indicates if the garage door is open. Everyone has driven down their street at night and seen an open door that someone has forgotten to close. This device has a flashing light indicating that your garage door is open.

 

Lighting is imperative when it comes to security. Make sure that you purchase a unit with lights. These lights automatically come on when opening or closing the door and create a safe and secure environment when entering your garage at night.

 

Many overhead door openers in apartment garages have their open delay times set too slow when entering or leaving the building. Make sure that your unit has a protective beam. This beam (when driven or walked through) prevents the door from coming down and crushing objects beneath it. When you are sure that you have this beam on your unit, make sure that the open time is not longer than five seconds. This will prevent the sneak thief from entering your building.

 

And remember, whenever you leave your home always make sure that your overhead garage door has closed completely, otherwise you might just find a few items missing when you arrive home!

 

snip

http://www.homeenvy.com/db/2/532.html

 

 

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Some more ideas:

 

Step 1: Use a Sectional Roll-Up Garage Door - If you still have an older style swingout garage door, replace it with a sectional roll-up garage door to protect against the threat of Corner-Pulling

 

 

Step 2: Only Use Rolling Code Remote Controls - If you are using fixed code remote controls, replace them with rolling code remote controls to protect against the risk of Code-Grabbing

 

Step 3: Invest in some good locks. T-Bar styles, corner bar locks, if your garage is manual look into good old fashioned long loop tumble locks to put threw the joints.

 

Garage%20Door%20Defender.gifd_237.jpg

 

If you truly intend to keep someone out you can get hurricane braces for the garage doors.

 

Just some ideas

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I like the hurricane braces, Cookie! Thanks for posting this info.

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Originally Posted By: JCK88
I like the hurricane braces, Cookie! Thanks for posting this info.


http://www.floridahurricanedepot.com/Secure%20Door.htm

Some styles of hurricane braces only take minutes to place once you drill the holes. grin

I need a smiley with a drill for the fortifications series... rofl

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moilui1.gif

 

Like this one?

 

Brilliant series, remember sometimes the most simple ways are the best.

Locked doors and windows are harder to gain entry than open ones.

Simple 'shed' alarms (battery powered screech alarms with magnetic triggers) produce around 110dB and are loud enough to make most opportunist thieves do a runner.

 

A good fence line and a squeeky gate, seriously.

 

Trimmed hedges and no dark corners, thieves don't like to be observed.

 

For more advice on home (and vehicle) security ask your local police force. They are very happy to help.

 

GW

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Originally Posted By: Greywolf UK
moilui1.gif

Like this one?

Brilliant series, remember sometimes the most simple ways are the best.
Locked doors and windows are harder to gain entry than open ones.
Simple 'shed' alarms (battery powered screech alarms with magnetic triggers) produce around 110dB and are loud enough to make most opportunist thieves do a runner.

A good fence line and a squeeky gate, seriously.

Trimmed hedges and no dark corners, thieves don't like to be observed.

For more advice on home (and vehicle) security ask your local police force. They are very happy to help.

GW


He's perfect GW!

All that you mentioned is very true. In some of the fortification series I do qoute different police/sheriff sites for the info. You can usually access your local law enforcement for ideas.

We have a television station (channel 10) that does the crime area/problem of the week to alert you to what's happening and what to be aware of danger wise.

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Security for electric garage doors

<span style="font-weight: bold">Code Grabber devices can grant intruders instant access to your garage.</span>

 

An automatic garage door opener is a terrific convenience and gives a certain sense of security as well. But modern technology has turned another convenience into a potential security risk!

 

When you last pushed the button on your remote control, who would've thought that you made it possible for an intruder to grab your frequency code with a device referred to in the industry as a Code Grabber? This electronic device stores the code and creates a golden opportunity for a thief to enter your home once you've left.

 

To stop this problem from happening, make sure that you purchase a garage door opener with rolling security codes instead of a fixed code.

 

Rolling code systems automatically change the code each time you operate your garage door. The code is selected from billions of combinations making it impossible for Code Grabbers to capture your security code in their memory.

 

For existing garage openers, you may be able to purchase an add-on device called a Code Encryptor. This device also code hops to billions of different codes stored in its memory and interfaces with most electric garage door openers.

 

If you have an older garage door opener (without rolling security codes) one way to assure that a thief won't enter while your on vacation is to unplug the unit.

 

Less sophisticated thieves can also trigger overhead garage doors if the openers have been left on the factory settings. Make sure when you purchase your electric garage door unit that you change the settings on both the garage door opener and remote.

 

To do this you must open your remote control, there'll be a series of switches inside. Change a couple of the settings making sure that you transfer these settings on the receiver as well to ensure that the garage door will open and close.

 

This procedure should always be done when purchasing a new home as well, as you never know who might have a remote to your electric garage door opener.

 

For years, garage remotes have been large and cumbersome. Because of this they are quite often left in the vehicle, usually on the visor in full view, creating an open invitation for a thief to take advantage of an opportunity.

 

Don't let this happen to you, purchase remotes that are smaller than a book of matches and small enough to place on a key chain. This way, you will be assured of having the remote with you at all times. You wouldn't leave your house keys on the seat of your car, so why leave your garage door remote on your visor?

 

Another security feature is a remote/receiver, perhaps installed in a bedroom, that indicates if the garage door is open. Everyone has driven down their street at night and seen an open door that someone has forgotten to close. This device has a flashing light indicating that your garage door is open.

 

Lighting is imperative when it comes to security. Make sure that you purchase a unit with lights. These lights automatically come on when opening or closing the door and create a safe and secure environment when entering your garage at night.

 

Many overhead door openers in apartment garages have their open delay times set too slow when entering or leaving the building. Make sure that your unit has a protective beam. This beam (when driven or walked through) prevents the door from coming down and crushing objects beneath it. When you are sure that you have this beam on your unit, make sure that the open time is not longer than five seconds. This will prevent the sneak thief from entering your building.

 

And remember, whenever you leave your home always make sure that your overhead garage door has closed completely, otherwise you might just find a few items missing when you arrive home!

 

snip

<a href="http://www.homeenvy.com/db/2/532.html" target="_blank">http://www.homeenvy.com/db/2/532.html</a>

When we had an old fashioned pull-up garage door(that only had a padlock and hasp on the outside) we put another padlock on the inside near the bottom. Katmom

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