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PureCajunSunshine

Pioneer Living - Laundry

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:008Laughing: *gasp* I'm laughing so hard at the muddy kid story that I cannot breathe! My belly hurts from laughing so much! I woke the dog up, and she thinks I have really lost it this time.

 

This 'un is so good, I'm printing it and including it in my lil' 'Bedside Reader' notebook. It's filled with precious gems I've collected over the years. Thank you for this, C4C!

Edited by PureCajunSunshine

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I used the Rapid Washer 3 times.

 

Not a fan.

 

The handle does come out, and it does rust even if you dry it- maybe if you live in an arid climate it's better, but not here.

 

For almost (or a little more than, including shipping) $20, it's a poorly made plunger, that rusts.

 

I just fill the tub, add soap and the clothes, beat 'em with my fists (very theraputic :24: ), wring, transfer to rinse water, beat 'em again :) , wring, and hang on the line.

 

the trickiest thing is learning how to wring with buttons INSIDE- I had a whole windowsill full of buttons before I got THAT down :tapfoot:

 

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I used the Rapid Washer 3 times. Not a fan. The handle does come out, and it does rust even if you dry it- maybe if you live in an arid climate it's better, but not here.

 

For almost (or a little more than, including shipping) $20, it's a poorly made plunger, that rusts.

 

 

 

the trickiest thing is learning how to wring with buttons INSIDE- I had a whole windowsill full of buttons before I got THAT down :tapfoot:

 

 

Good information. I live in a very arid climate, so as long as I wipe the Rapid Washer dry and leave it plunger side up for the air to circulate inside it doesn't rust.

So, Rapid Washer is only good for those that live in the desert - don't waste your money if you live where there is humidity. Sound about right?

 

LOL about wringing with the buttons inside. I haven't had to wring anything with buttons but I'll keep this in mind.

Edited by SlingMama

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ARGH! The handle of my Wonder Wash broke off. Tried to fix it but it's plastic on plastic so no go.

Now the old waterkettle in the washouse/barn is connected to the chimney, I can heat up water and use it for laundry, bath, waterbathcanning.

So picture yours truly bend over a steaming kettle, trying to scoop out buckets of near-boiling water for laundry. Yep, glasses steam up and me is lost in the fog.

Still the contents of buckets get chucked in the Wonder Wash (who is not so wonderful anymore) and I just turn the gadget by hand. Leave HOT HOT HOT water in WW for an hour and try to pry out laundry by then.

Ofcourse the work is slightly better when wearing think latex gloves but still no task for the fainthearted.

 

Try sterilising glass jars and fishing them out with a pair of bbq-thongs... Add steamed up specs again and... you've got the picture.

Still, as long as there is wood, there is hot water, there is a tiny tub to wash myself and the clothes in.

 

You can guess the moment I came back last saturday I dunked a whole load of laundry in the machine here :lol:

 

SNC000111.jpg

Edited by Christy

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Christy, do you have canning jar tongs? These are sized particularly for canning jars and aren't nearly as dangerous as regular BBQ tongs.

 

Also, just curious - perhaps you can rig up a pulley system for the buckets of wash water - kind of like a fireplace pot 'swinger' and a well pulley system for buckets. It might work.

 

Take care!

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Oh C4C, that pulley system is a good idea! As I'm still in the process of setting everything up, most things are half done now.

There is a hook on the other side of the barn where animals used to be hung after butchering. Will try to get one in the beam above the kettle for water as well.

 

Future plan is to tile part of the barn and make it suitable for meat processing.

Right now, I'm just lucky to have stepped out of the shower here in Holland :rolleyes: Back to the basics on monday again.

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Wow! I agree.. the cow poop mud story is a keeper! I was wondering, have any of you ever used -6 gallon buckets to wash clothes? I havent done it (yet) but I watched a video on YOU tube in which the guy showed it being done. He said to put a rock in there (with water and whatever for soap) and for agitation you could always build an improvised see saw and then attach it to the middle, or roll it in yard (actually he said get the kids to do it). Lastly, he mentioned just shaking it back and forth in your hands or taking on horse back, the back of a truck, etc.

 

This would obviously NOT work for a large volume of clothes, but I think we will easily be able to pare down our wardrobes when there is no automatic machine washer.

 

Anyone tried this? Do you think it would work?

 

One more thing. I found a site with really cheap washboard, and they have lots of different types. I noticed the metal are a no-go. Besides Glass, would you recommend any other one? I am going to get a couple a some washtubs from them as well. If anyone is interested, I can post the link to the site as well.

 

 

Maranatha!

Edited by ncnewbie

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Hey everyone!

 

The name of the company is columbus washboard. Here is the link. It is different from the last time I went there (about two months ago, and the prices have definitely GONE UP, but they are still WAY cheaper than anyone local or other internet source. They have a PDF file, download that, and then you can see pictures of all their different ones they have and match the number up with the list on the page.

 

http://www.columbuswashboard.com/products.htm

 

IS this a good deal, or does someone have another site cheaper?

 

Maranatha!

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Just wanted to sneak this in. Few days ago I received an Emergency Essentials catalog (BePrepared.com) and they are selling a Mobile Washer. Looks like the Rapid Washer only it appears the plunger is plastic (guessing from the photo) and the handle screws in. No idea of the quality but if someone purchases one then please let us all know because plastic plunger and screw-on handle would take care of the problems plaguing the Rapid Washer.

 

 

And rolling a bucket of laundry around sounds like a good idea. My kids would love to do that - for awhile anyway, until they decided it was work and not play anymore ;)

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When traveling, I sometimes use a 5 gallon bucket with a lid as a clothes washer. I throw in my dirty clothes (one day's worth at a time, per bucket), along with hot soapy water. After snugging the lid on real tight, I then strap it to the inside of my truck's tailgate.

 

Bumpety bump bump... the clothes inside the bucket get a good workout and wash themselves merrily down the road...

 

After a few hours, they are ready to go into the 'rinse cycle'. At day's end, the clothes can wrung out, and hung up in camp/motel/whatever. If it is humid out, or if I need to get a move on, I'll chuck the clothes into a commercial dryer at a laundromat..

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I saw that Emergency Essentials laundry thingy, and I love the design of the thing, and would like to test drive it! It looks like it would probably work a little better than the alternative...(I have a couple of brand new toilet plungers and five gallon buckets stashed away for emergency laundering.)

 

I don't remember if I mentioned this early on in this thread...but if you buy a toilet plunger for emergency laundering purposes, get the red rubber kind, NOT the black one. After a time the blackness will wear off onto your clothes! The red one seems much more durable.

 

ncnewbie, I'm thinking a rock in the bucket will work well, but will be extra hard on the clothes!

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Hey Christy, I love that spa / canning station / laundry room you got going there in the barn! It might be a good thing that the woodburner is in the corner...that way, if wintertime finds you still having to bathe in the barn, you can string up 'curtains' of sorts to make a smaller triangular 'room' and trap some of that fire's heat to warm yo' cold wet booty!

 

Do you think your house will be renovated enough to do indoor baths by wintertime?

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Do you think your house will be renovated enough to do indoor baths by wintertime?

 

Probably could be. Just got back from a whirlwind trip with a van filled to the brim with stuff for there. Went yesterday came back a few hour ago. Found a very old and drop dead gorgeous zinc bathtub someone donated. The handyman probably collected it and put it in the barn. It belonged to the dear old mum of neighbour's friend (no longer with us for 30 years or so so that tub is OLD).

Please keep in mind he does not want money for his work cos he knows I have nothing left.

So he scored this beautiful tub and a while back the old bathoven. Only practical work is replacing part of the bathroomfloor, place oven, connect to chimney, feed water to oven... You see, this would probably take me two years, he might pull it off before winter.

 

73 years old and as strong as an ox he is. Skinny as a rake and I am well embarrassed to have him do anything there. Just cannot afford to say no to it.

Either way, I wouldn't be fussed to bath and wash in the barn over winter.

 

 

About the plunger, got the red one and cut two splits in it. Works pretty well. Will take it with me when we leave for there on monday again.

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PCS - ingenious, washing of clothes in the car! SMART! I'm going to do it!

 

Christy - perhaps you can 'thank' this gentleman with some baking or 'city' items you can bring to the country. Many men would do just about anything for a pie or tin of cookies or a certain type of pipe tocacco and a grateful heart. :)

 

Perhaps you could also make inquiries of the neighbors and see what his favorite color is or knit him a scarf or something, with fall coming. Such things really do melt the heart and bring people together. :)

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C4C, no worries there. I buy him cakes every day cos he eats poorly.

Am taking my old electric garden pond pump as a pressie cos he tinkers with that sort of stuff.

Have paid him for laying the tiles cos that was backbreaking work and he accepted it.

Ordered tulipbulbs for him cos that is what he likes. They´ll be delivered to him in november when planting season starts.

Plus he wife has emotional issues. She is 20 years younger than he is and he knows I´d be the one to take care of her if something happens to him.

Everybody loves her but with my professional background, she enjoys hanging out a lot with me. So I pick her up often and take her shopping, to a concert (open air so free) or we just sit and talk. She´s medicated to the eyeballs but feels at ease with me so whenever he´s away, he drops her off at my place or I pick her up so she is in a safe environment. She cannot be left alone too long and he´s away whole days mostly.

And although I don´t like it, I often buy him a few packets of cigarettes. He smokes like a chimney and I´d rather not contribute to that but it´s one way to slip him something unnoticed.

 

So it´s not one way traffic fortunately :)

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Hi, everyone, I just got back from an extended vacation and only took a few minutes to run through Mrs. S. I couldn't help but add a bit to this thread.

 

We have been gone (all but a couple of day's) for over a month, most of it spent on the road or stationary at swap meets for several days at a time. Stopping at a laundromat was costing us about fifteen dollars a time so I used two buckets with lids I'd brought along in the motorhome "just in case". I filled them with water the night before being on the road and put in our dirty clothes in one with a very small amount of soap. They hold a surprising amount. Half way through the day I lightly wrung the clothes out and put them in the fresh water bucket to rinse. Sometimes I refilled the soapy water bucket with more clothes. At the end of the day of traveling I wrung them out just enough so they didn't drip as I took them outside and hung them on a line between trees or on the motorhome to drip all night. That saved a lot of wringing and by morning they were usually ready for a day on a line inside if we were traveling or just a day of sun if stationary. A couple of nights it rained but that only rinsed them with soft water and they dried wrinkle free.

 

I figure we saved about forty five dollars that way and next time we travel I will pay special attention to bringing clothes that are a bit easier to handle, say skirts and blouses instead of dresses. One down side to this is the last week of our trip it was extremely HOT and wet clothes in a motor home just was NOT the way to go. I brought the laundry home to wash in a nice friendly automatic....though I will hang them outside.

 

We also got a chance to use our solar shower more than once and were extremely grateful for it when the showers were non-existant or too far away for me to comfortably walk.

 

I can't wait to read more of what you all have been discussing.

 

Hugs everyone.

:bighug2:

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