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So, let's say your internet is going to be turned of in 24 hours...forever


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I am contemplating shutting down our internet for a while (and if it works out, maybe longer smile ), and today I was trying to think about the things I'd want to have if I didn't have access to the internet.

 

I decided I needed to order a number of seed catalogues, so I have the addresses and phone #s of the seed companies. Also order catalogues from a few of my favorite homeschooling resources for the same reason.

 

I thought about getting free newsletters from some companies so I can stay on top of what is happening to them.

 

Preparedness books and good do-it-yourself books. Gardening books. Books that teach "how to", like maybe blacksmithing and animal husbandry.

 

And I'd want to print off all the stuff that I keep in my favorites, like all the ways to used dried milk and how to preserve butter and margarine.

 

Whew! That's a lot of work.

 

Would some of you list the books you would order, catalogues, newsletters, and the stuff you would download if you found out you would only have your internet for 24 more hours?

 

That way, you might hit on some things I miss. Specifics would be nice. Especially regarding preparedness books and diy books.

 

If this is all together somewhere on this board already, could someone direct me to it?

Thanks. smile

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Download "CutePDFwriter" (it's free) and you can "print" any web page into a .pdf file saved on your computer, without the cost of ink or paper.

 

I use cutepdfwriter all the time. It's great.

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DarleneSwoon No internet!! Oh my!! ....runs to get smelling salts....

 

First thing I'd keep in mind is to try to deactivate some of my mail that I get...I hate to think of an unattended mailbox for a "while". rollingeyes

 

Secondly, I'd keep in mind that I could always go to the library and access things I realized I missed or needed.

 

Thirdly, I'd have to switch all of our accounts back to paper delivery stuff, cause we do it all online. Statements/etc.

 

And lastly, I'd be absolutely shocked at how much time I "discovered" by having no internet. whistling

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Originally Posted By: Tracie
Download "CutePDFwriter" (it's free) and you can "print" any web page into a .pdf file saved on your computer, without the cost of ink or paper.

I use cutepdfwriter all the time. It's great.


Ah-ha! I was just going to write this! I love CutePDF and use it all the time. Especially when something is a ton of pages and I don't want to print the whole thing, but I'm not sure I'll ever find it again online...

It's also great to use when you don't know if someone else has a program that you have and don't know if they will be able to open a file to look at. Just print to PDF and everyone can open the file. We also use it for our quotes for our business. Anyone can change a Word or Excel file, but you can't change an original PDF, without it being apparent.

Definitely my favorite utility program.
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Well, aside from the PDF file and one link (both which are *excellent suggestions; thank you!!), you people are not very helpful! Trying to scare me off of turning off the internet.

 

rofl

 

And do not mention not ordering off the internet. I hate shopping. I hate it so bad that...well, I hate it so bad that I can't think of anything worse to compare it to. So the internet has kept me out of stores, and that will be a terrible change.

 

But....let's just say there is a solar flare. There. That's it. Forget doing it voluntarily.

 

OK. Now. Tell me...what are you going to print or buy or make sure you have on hardcopy? (And NO hand-held wheatberry powered KOL games!!) rofl

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Honestly, I will give up the Internet ONLY when it is totally unavailable to me. I make my living via its use, telecommuting. But, here's what I can offer in terms of alternative resources:

 

I have an extensive library of reference books that I tend to refer to. I won't even try to list them all, but I'll try to hit my favorites in the homesteading, survival areas:

 

The Encyclopedia of Country Living - Carla Emery (there is a new edition out, published posthumously, that I want to get - I have a well-worn copy of the previous edition).

 

The Complete Tightwad Gazette - Amy Dacyczyn

 

Foxfire 2 (the one with spinning and weaving, as it helps me remember how to dress a loom, which somehow I always seem to need a refresher on)

 

Root Cellaring - Mike & Nancy Bubel. I used this to design and build a root cellar in a previous home, and now it will be pressed into service again at this home.

 

Build Your Own Earth Oven - Kiko Denzer. I want to build one of these, hopefully next year - too much to do this year to manage it, I'm afraid.

 

Keeping Livestock Healthy - N. Bruce Haynes, D.V.M. - pretty decent multi-species reference book.

 

Goats - I think my most used reference is stil Raising Milk Goats the Modern Way - Jerry Belanger. There are things in it (as with any of these) that I don't agree with, but there is also much wisdom there.

 

I would also print off or otherwise save much of the material on the FiasCo website: http://fiascofarm.com/goats/index.htm - she really has a great reference site!

 

I also have a book that I got through an Extension course from the University of Illinois - Lambing School. That was back in my sheep farming days. But that information was priceless, and is applicable to kidding also. If your ag college in your state puts on classes for farmers, TAKE THEM. At least in my state they are CHEAP, and you get a lot of info for very little money.

 

By the same token, I have Grazing in Illinois, which is from a course I took on management intensive grazing (how to maximize grass production on your land so as to minimize hay use). And, I have the Illinois Master Gardener Manual, which is excellent. Take that course if you can, in your state.

 

Another OUTSTANDING resource is ATTRA. They are essentially an ag extension service for sustainable agriculture practices. If it involves raising crops or livestock, they probably have an article on the topic already. If not, CALL THEM at 800-346-9140 and talk to them - they will research the issue for you and send you a packet of info, and then they will publish an article on the topic also, likely. They subsequently wrote an article, spawned by one of my questions, back when I had a farm. laughhttp://attra.ncat.org/

 

The Complete Herbal Handbook for Farm and Stable - Juliette de Bairacli Levy.

 

Medicinal Herbs in the Garden, Field, and Marketplace - Lee Sturdivant and Tim Blakley.

 

The Healing Herbs - Michael Castleman (pretty conservative, but still useful)

 

Today's Herbal Health - Louise Tenney

 

Rodale's All-New Encyclopedia of Organic Gardening

 

The Encyclopedia of Natural Insect and Disease Control - Roger Yepsen, Editor

 

The Draft Horse Primer - Maurice Telleen

 

Putting Food By - Janet Greene, et al

 

Cheesemaking Made Easy - Ricki Carroll and Robert Carroll

 

The American Woman's Cookbook - a very old cookbook with old recipes using old style methods

 

Seed to Seed - Suzanne Ashworth - a valuable reference if you want to save seed from year to year for gardening.

 

I have put together a LARGE binder on Dutch Oven Cooking from sources on the Internet. My favorite is from back in my Boy Scout leader days, LOL! It is The Geezer Cookbook - Dwayne Pritchett.

http://macscouter.com/cooking/docs/GEEZERCB.pdf

 

Gosh, then I have medical reference books, species specific veterinary books, books on knitting (patterns and such), dog training -- we have LOTS of books on that, home improvement how to do it books ... LOL! It would take too long to list them all!

 

 

But that is a start on a good home reference library.

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Order a catalog from Lehman's. If you place an order with them, they'll send you one for free. If not, it's like $3-$5...somewhere in there. They are always getting new self-sufficiency books and merchandise. I don't order anything online either, so I don't know what I'd do without my Lehman's catalog (I suppose I would have to make another trip out there)!

 

My favorite homeschool catalogs are:

 

Keepers of the Faith

Vision Forum

Nature's Workshop

Christian Book Distributers -- Homeschool catalog

Love to Learn

 

I would print as much as possible from my favorite Bible, homemaking, homeschooling and prepardness websites. I would sit in front of the computer for the day and just continuously print (make sure you have enough paper and ink first)

 

Keep a list of your favorite websites so you can still visit them at the library if that will be an option in your future.

 

 

Make sure you receive a paper hardcopy of statements from your bank and other bills since now you will need to track your accounts via phone and mail. This would be an issue for me, since I keep a very close eye on my bank account online every single day. But then again.....maybe we'll just do away with the bank too, since I don't trust banks at all.

 

I have been thinking about getting rid of internet also to continue weaning myself off modern convieniences and "worldly" influences. It's a hard one to do.

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Excellent! There are a number of things here I did not think of!

 

Thank you thank you thank you! smilesmilesmile

 

Cootie, that last is part of the reason I'm thinking of cutting it off. Not that I have the courage *yet*, but I'm working on it. As for the "worldly" part, it is really easy for me to get caught up in what everyone is saying instead of what The One has already said. I'm pitiful.

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WHAT NO KOL???

 

but I just spend 10 million meat to get a hole dug in the clan basement to find the sewers... of course it was another 1 million meat to clear the sewers to find Hobopolis!

 

new territory to explore!

 

everything else... survival stuff... it is how I live, so it is all in my head.

 

The best thing you can do is live it, learn it and then you won't need the internet. When SHTF, you won't have time for the internet.

 

Probably the best book you can get is the

The Encyclopedia of Country Living - Carla Emery

 

http://www.carlaemery.com/

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I'd print off the extension service information about canning, gardening, etc. while I could still get it.

 

Also, if you might need replacement parts for your canner, tools, well anything really, now would be the time to do the online research for tha contact/ordering information and part numbers.

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Shurleen,

 

You are NOT pitiful. It really is hard when you get so used to a convienience and learn to depend on it. I'm guilty as well. I am trying to give up internet as well, and I'm still working out the bugs. Even though many Christians advocate the use of internet, well....it just doesn't seem to fit with what we are taught in the Bible. You are doing a good thing!

 

I completely forgot about the Emergency Essentials catalog mentioned above. Absolutely a must! I love receiving my monthly sale catalog.

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The first thing that springs to mind is that you are homeschooling and thinking of turning off the Internet. That alone would stop me. There is too much research stuff available online, and while we all did just fine without it, there is now stuff that is not readily available without going online. First thing that comes to mind are encyclopedias.

 

But if you are all set on it, I'd head on over to Project Gutenberg to download tons of free public domain books. This is a great project, so if you have some time to donate to proof reading the scans, go on over to the Distributed Proofreaders site and sign up. And before you say that you can't do that kind of thing, they show you what to do and have different levels of difficulty.

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Shurleen,

 

I always get paper copies of all my catalogues, so I'm good there.

 

I do pay all my bills online and LOVE the fact I can do it in minutes with a click, rather than much longer by mail.

 

I'd have to go back to writing letters again (maybe a chance to polish up my teacher's penmanship), should we have mail service if electric goes out.

 

I think I would miss this place the most.

 

Also, I would feel like I'm thrown back 15 years with techology, for I'm corresponding with a professor(over an hour away) as I'm working on my dissertation. Thanks to the internet, my final doctoral studies are possible from home. I save on gas, long distance, on-campus housing AND library time!

 

When I did my MA 9 years ago, the internet was still fairly new. I spend scads of time at libraries, bribing the librarians with chocolate, cookies, coffee, etc. to get the resources I needed.

 

Research engines like EbscoHost, FirstSearch, etc. were BRAND NEW, and about a year behind with posting online. NOW, everything is CURRENT, up to a few weeks of publication. I've been able to literally request resources BY MYSELF from all over the world. I cannot tell you how great this is. I do still have to wait some times for hard-snail-mail copies of articles to arrive, but most of them I can click and print.

 

It would really thrust me into the dark ages, but I could still finish if we had snail mail, it would be LOTS more cumbersome, but still doable.

 

 

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Fritz,

 

Thanks so much for those sources! I LOVE reading everything on-line, as an educator, it is such an important part of learning. smile

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NO INTERNET????????????

 

eek

 

Personally, I'd sooner find alternatives for TP than for the net!!! blush Just sayin'...

 

One thing to think about...communications problems after disasters (like Katrina) are guaranteed. During the evacuation, the internet was invaluable to get info on the disaster area. It was the ONLY reliable source, in fact...few ppl have ham radios, but most do have internet access.

 

No internet??? reaction.gif

 

 

Todd.gif Hello. My name is Abigail and I am an internet junkie...LOL

 

Abigail

 

P.S. Seriously, though...thanks for the ideas and links! They're great!

 

 

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Originally Posted By: Fritz_Monroe
The first thing that springs to mind is that you are homeschooling and thinking of turning off the Internet. That alone would stop me. There is too much research stuff available online, and while we all did just fine without it, there is now stuff that is not readily available without going online. First thing that comes to mind are encyclopedias.

But if you are all set on it, I'd head on over to Project Gutenberg to download tons of free public domain books. This is a great project, so if you have some time to donate to proof reading the scans, go on over to the Distributed Proofreaders site and sign up. And before you say that you can't do that kind of thing, they show you what to do and have different levels of difficulty.


Whoo hoo! I love that kind of thing! Thanks for pointing me in that direction. smilesmilesmile
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