Jump to content
MrsSurvival Discussion Forums

How much to plant?


Recommended Posts

We had a container garden this past Summer. You can get a lot off each plant. We only had 2 plants and were able to make up a batch of Annie's Salsa to can. We also used our peppers in this as well. For me, the peppers produced much better than the tomatoes did.

 

About the only real advice I can offer is to just give it a try. Get a feel for what you can grow in your area and how much each plant produces. I've seen people grow 50 or more tomato plants all in 5 gallon buckets.

Link to post

FP, I think it depends on the variety and how you manage your garden and the weather. Some sites say plants can average 50 to 60 (20-25 lbs) over a season. That's not too bad. I found some web information for you...

http://www.gotomatogardening.com/2008/11/2...-per-plant.html

 

http://msucares.com/crops/comhort/yield.html

http://yardener.com/YardenersPlantHelper/F...tables/Tomatoes

 

http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qi...11050120AAaDpzN

 

 

 

 

 

 

Link to post

I'm a container gardener as well. For tomatoes, I find the larger the pot, the larger the yield by the end of the season. For my smaller 5gal pots, I mostly just grow the cherry tomatoes in those. My philosophy is to grow as much as I possibly can in whatever containers I can scrape up - this includes taking "freebies" out of the neighbors recycling cans! I had 28 tomato plants this year and canned 54 pints of salsa, 24 pints of Minnesota Mix, and 12 pints of stewed tomatoes. I also dehydrated 2 - 1 gallon ziploc freezer bags full. (The varieties I grow are Amish Paste, Celebrity, and Cherry) My 15 pepper plants produced really well and I didn't have to supplement any of them, but I did pick up an extra 50lbs of tomatoes at the farmer's market to supplement my own. Sorry, that's as closely as I can manage to keep records! (I really upped the salsa production this year because I gave a lot away this Christmas Season. Next year I won't make as much salsa because everyone's getting jam! Gotta use up my oranges and raspberries somehow and I also got a steal on pectin!)

 

I think that the thing to do is to figure out how much of a product you use each year and then try to grow what you need to produce that amount. I am able to grow the tomatoes, peppers, and onions necessary to produce a year's worth of salsa and stewed tomatoes as well as dehydrate enough to throw in stir fry's and salads during the winter. I cannot grow enough to produce my own spaghetti sauce - it takes something like 35 lbs of tomatoes to produce 7 quarts of the stuff. I can't do that on my 1/4 acre city lot. We easily go through 18-24 quarts of spaghetti sauce a year, this doesn't count the additional 6-12 jars I go through for pot lucks and suppers for friends who are sick or need assistance. That puts me at roughly 36 jars of spaghetti sauce a year (3 a month), divide that by 7 and thats a bit over 5 batches of spaghetti sauce I would have to make - that's an additional 175 lbs of tomatoes I would have to grow. I wish I had the room, but I don't.

 

Good luck with your planning and if you manage to keep better records than I do, I'd love to hear your results!

Link to post

Well I am sure going to try to keep records. I just planted some of my starts today, but I only planted 9 purple cherokee tomatoes, so it seems I will need to up my plantings quite a bit. I also started onions, several variates of peppers and some herbs.

 

 

Do you plant all you plants in 5 gallons or what other types of containers do you use?

Link to post

Here are pictures of my container garden from last Spring, keep in mind that by the end of summer I had to use a machete to get from one end to the other, but overall, I was really happy with my yields, including the potatoes grown in straw.

 

http://www.mrssurvival.com/forums/ubbthr...ge=3#Post204865

 

I also grow stuff in pots all the way around my yard, all over my patio, and I have stuff in the ground as much as I can. I'm slowly ripping out all of the inedible stuff and putting in lots of edibles. Just bought two more blueberries today! I even planted colorful chard instead of pansies in my window boxes on the front of the house this winter (here in Central California, I garden year round. I especially love winter because I can grow all of my salad stuff - with the exception of tomatoes which is why I dehydrate so many!)

 

Good Luck! It can be done. Just take a look at this website:

 

www.pathtofreedom.com

 

They are such an inspiration to space-challenged gardener geeks!

 

Oh, and in answer to your original question, I plant in everything - from popcorn tins to large plastic totes, to 5 gal buckets bummed off the neighbors! The large wooden planter boxes you see in the pics were made from the old fence. And as you can see, in the part of the yard, I garden on top of cement.

Link to post

Funky, try making your own earth boxes. These things work well with tomatoes, lettuce, squash, cucumbers and zuchinni.

 

http://www.instructables.com/id/Building-your-own-Earth-Box/

 

I had more squash, cucumbers, zuchinni and lettuce than I could handle(that was pre-freezer days) The tomatoes did well but the drought struck. I think I still would have had a fairly good crop if it hadn't been for those darn tomato hornworms. I had three vines and one day they were loaded with blooms and little tomatoes next day they were bare...stripped clean...darn pest.

 

But any way they boxes are not that hard to make although they are a little expensive it make watering a heck of a lot easier. Hubby said the only thing he would change is make the PVC pipe longer and angle it so it would be easier to find in the tomatoes.

 

I had 3 tomato plants per box, 2 squash per box, 2 zucchini per box and 4 cucumbers per box. The way I did the lettuce was just sow the seeds (1/4 pack) in the box, I didn't thin it but we had a salad (fed 4 adults) per night and I would take a salad for lunch. About every 5 weeks I would sow more seeds on top of what was in there and I had lettuce all through the summer. I kept it on my patio, it got the morning sun but shade the rest of the day. One pack of lettuce fed us spring, summer and fall.

Link to post
  • 1 month later...
we grow both peas and beans in containers in the greenhouse an dthe garden. Peas grow up a bamboo pole an dhte beans just grow up together. You need to keep them watered.

 

:Michael1:

 

 

Well, I figured I probably could....my Mom told me that I need to get "bush" beans so that I don't have to worry about "poling" them. We can't really build a garden out back because of the dogs so we were going to try to plant some in containers. I tried tomatos last year after I found this site....it was too late to plant but I tried anyway. It worked until my baby girl started grabbing them off the vine!!! LOL

Link to post

I'm very fond of barrel halves, because they need to be watered only once a day--even on hot, hot days. I have a friend who uses only 5-gallon and 3.5-gallon buckets, and who uses drip irrigation (meaning an old hose snaking among them, with nail holes for each bucket, and with a car's hose clamp to seal off the end).

 

Herbs, salad greens, and strawberries do well in 1.5 to 2-gallon containers, even if the containers are shallow like window boxes, but I have to keep them shaded for the afternoon (which slows growth) unless someone is around to water them.

 

I am getting flack from the county code people about my front yard's unsightly hodgepodge of planting containers. I'm considering going out there with a bucket of paint and painting them all a uniform color.

Link to post
I'm very fond of barrel halves, because they need to be watered only once a day--even on hot, hot days. I have a friend who uses only 5-gallon and 3.5-gallon buckets, and who uses drip irrigation (meaning an old hose snaking among them, with nail holes for each bucket, and with a car's hose clamp to seal off the end).

 

Herbs, salad greens, and strawberries do well in 1.5 to 2-gallon containers, even if the containers are shallow like window boxes, but I have to keep them shaded for the afternoon (which slows growth) unless someone is around to water them.

 

I am getting flack from the county code people about my front yard's unsightly hodgepodge of planting containers. I'm considering going out there with a bucket of paint and painting them all a uniform color.

Oh thats a good Idea. I just had my 12 year old drill holes in the bottom of a baby pool we're planning on planting zuchhini and cantalopes in . As soon as the drill re charges we are going to start on the buckets for upside down gardens.

Link to post

Back when my yard flooded a lot, I planted squash and other stuff in a baby pool. It worked fine. It also floated off down the street in one of the near-hurricanes, and the neighbor who got to it first dumped the contents in a ditch and busted up the pool to add to a debris pile.

Link to post

If you paint the containers green, they will blend in and hide behind the foliage very nicely.

 

 

edited to fix typos.

Edited by Leah
Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.