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texana

Prep storage in Texas

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My retreat is in the middle of Texas, as the crow flies about 20 miles from the geographical center of Texas. If anyone has been to Texas iin the summer or lives here you kknow how hot it can get. I know the cooler you can keep your food stock the longer it will last. Any suggestions on keeping food stuffs cool in Texas. I have my buckets in an out building and my canned goods in a room in the house with no A/C.

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texana, you did just fine with your first post, well done!! clap And welcome4

 

There are some really good threads about properly storing your buckets,etc.. here in this forum. Plus, there are several members who live in Texas, so I know you'll be getting lots of good answers.

 

I do know that temperature is of vital importance in storage. Here in Alabama, we also have tremendous humidity to deal with.

 

See you around the board!

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The good thing is that the soil temps are in the low 70s. How high is the water table there? Can you dig down or berm up? Have you looked at earthbags? If you can build something from earthbags or concrete (ferrocement perhaps?) and berm over it or dig out like for a storm cellar or root cellar, it should stay in a good range for storage food.

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This reminds me of a ? I have - is PVC ok to store foods in? Not directly, but bags/cans etc? If our water travels through it, I would think it would be ok right?

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Nope. Not all PVC is the same, nor is all capable of being used in the home for drinking water. Mostly it is used for the outgoing or outdoors.

 

This is especially true with those white plastic pails that people love to get for free from businesses thinking they can be used for storing food. Only food grade pails please and they are marked with the grade. Most are not food grade.

 

 

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What about putting cans of food inside the pvc? Is that harmful? I thought plastic was mainly harmful if heated up with food. I have an insane idea - pack dry goods in foodsaver bags or can items, then put into the large pvc pipes, glue/cap the ends shut, bury in the ground about 2 feet. This thread about tx heat made me think of this - I actually got this idea from a mag where a guy stored a gun this same way for something like 15 years. I was thinking if stored below ground this way, the heat wouldn't affect it like it would if it was sitting in a garage or something. If anyone has info or links where I could find out "why" this wouldn't be an option, please let me know.

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Hmmm, pvc seems pretty cheap - guess I need to go check prices first and see what size options are available. I just don't want to try it if it's hazardous to my health or something.

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What about putting cans of food inside the pvc? Is that harmful? I thought plastic was mainly harmful if heated up with food. I have an insane idea - pack dry goods in foodsaver bags or can items, then put into the large pvc pipes, glue/cap the ends shut, bury in the ground about 2 feet. This thread about tx heat made me think of this - I actually got this idea from a mag where a guy stored a gun this same way for something like 15 years. I was thinking if stored below ground this way, the heat wouldn't affect it like it would if it was sitting in a garage or something. If anyone has info or links where I could find out "why" this wouldn't be an option, please let me know.

 

3 feet deep would be better. At 3 feet deep, the temperature is about 60-degrees F.

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Nope. Not all PVC is the same, nor is all capable of being used in the home for drinking water. Mostly it is used for the outgoing or outdoors.

 

This is especially true with those white plastic pails that people love to get for free from businesses thinking they can be used for storing food. Only food grade pails please and they are marked with the grade. Most are not food grade.

 

 

 

My whole house has PVC pipe in it. The outgoing pipes are ABS pipe. Check with your building supply company to see what kind would be best. I did use some PVC pipe as a mold for soap. It turned out very well! Course I'm not gonna eat the soap! =)

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Texana:

 

I am concerned as well about heat since I am in Louisiana. Do you have a well? A "pump house"? Well water is cold and the pump house seems to be the coolest place around here in the summer with no ac.

 

We were thinking of lining the walls with sheets of styrofoam, putting in some shelves and maybe using it sort of as a root celar to store mostly root crops...

 

Just a thought.

 

If you eat what your storeand rotate your food, you shouldn't have it more than a year or 2.

 

Here is a chart for dehydrated foods.

 

Storage Life & Temperature of Dehydrated Foods

Temperature and temperature changes have the most to do with the shelf life of stored food then any other factor. The USDA states, "Each (10.08F) drop in temperature doubles the storage life of dehydrated foods ".

 

Sorry, columns wouldn't line up right.

 

Temperature Years

 

37.6 40

48.4 30

59.2 20

70.0 10

80.8 5

91.6 2.5

102.4 1.25

Edited by CoM

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