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Breastfeeding vs. Bottlefeeding


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I bottlefed breastmilk on my first. My second, was formula fed after 3-4mo when my milk dried up from being pregnant immediately...#3 was breastfed on breast for 6-8mo.

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Yet another reason to consider breastfeeding:

 

Breastfeeding reduces risk of gluten intolerance

 

Gluten intolerance, or celiac disease, has massive implications on the diet and lifestyle of those who suffer from it. They must constantly be vigilant for traces of wheat in their diet and the long-term implications of the disease can often be alarming. A new study suggests that there is a simple way to cut down on a newborn's chances of developing this disorder -- breastfeeding.
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Yet another reason to consider breastfeeding:

 

Breastfeeding reduces risk of gluten intolerance

 

You know, it irks me the way these things are worded. Breastfeeding does not reduce the risk of gluten intolerance. Formula feeding increases the risk. It might seem nitpicking, but breast milk is the default food for infants. Any "abilities" they they get from breast milk is what they should be getting. So breast milk doesn't reduce the instance of gluten intolerance or ear infections, it doesn't increase IQ. We're not supposed to have as much intolerance to gluten as we do, as many ear infections as we do, as low IQs as we do. Formula has made these intolerances and illnesses so standard, that it's now breast milk that seems to improve what has gone wrong. :(

 

ps "Low IQ" is relative, we're talking a few points, not a 30-40 drop.

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You know, it irks me the way these things are worded. Breastfeeding does not reduce the risk of gluten intolerance. Formula feeding increases the risk. It might seem nitpicking, but breast milk is the default food for infants. Any "abilities" they they get from breast milk is what they should be getting. So breast milk doesn't reduce the instance of gluten intolerance or ear infections, it doesn't increase IQ. We're not supposed to have as much intolerance to gluten as we do, as many ear infections as we do, as low IQs as we do. Formula has made these intolerances and illnesses so standard, that it's now breast milk that seems to improve what has gone wrong. :(

 

ps "Low IQ" is relative, we're talking a few points, not a 30-40 drop.

 

I think they word articles like this because a lot of "modern" mums would prefer to forumla feed because its more "now" so this is a way to get them thinking about breastfeeding not being something crazy, but rather a natural part of pregnancy and parenting. They're trying to make it less "old school" ;)

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Wow! Thank you so much for all your responses and encouragement. You have given me some things to think about.

BTW, what is bug out and SHTF?

 

Bugging out is leaving your home incase of an emergency (as opposed to bunning in)

SHTF = *crap* or "something" hitting the fan

 

^_^

Edited by PrairieGirl
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You know, it irks me the way these things are worded. Breastfeeding does not reduce the risk of gluten intolerance. Formula feeding increases the risk. It might seem nitpicking, but breast milk is the default food for infants. Any "abilities" they they get from breast milk is what they should be getting. So breast milk doesn't reduce the instance of gluten intolerance or ear infections, it doesn't increase IQ. We're not supposed to have as much intolerance to gluten as we do, as many ear infections as we do, as low IQs as we do. Formula has made these intolerances and illnesses so standard, that it's now breast milk that seems to improve what has gone wrong. :(

 

ps "Low IQ" is relative, we're talking a few points, not a 30-40 drop.

While I agree with you Josephine, I would encourage ALL OF US to remember that this thread is for one mom exploring her options. This can be a highly charged, emotional issue; let's try to stick to this mom and her questions.

 

 

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I'm probably uniquely qualified to answer this question, as I've just had my sixth child...all my children have been BOTH breastfed and bottle fed. The reason why is that for some reason, my body just doesn't produce milk well. I've tried it all...all the tricks, the herbal supplements, etc. I'm able to breast feed for about six months, then my supply drops off. My last baby was only for four months or so.

 

The amount of effort I put into it has a big impact. One baby I got to twelve months. He was a good nurser, I co-slept with him, never used pacifiers, nursed on demand, pumped sometimes, and used a lot of fenugreek supplements.

 

Most of my children were almost exclusively breastfed, then supplemented with formula once my supply started dropping off. At which point, they usually weaned themselves, preferring the easier, more ample supply from the bottle than working hard to get the meager supply from my breasts. Although I always had formula around from the beginning with each child, for emergencies, etc.

 

Here's my take on breastfeeding (some of this has already been mentioned):

 

Convenience: Having done both, breastfeeding is MUCH more convenient. There are times I think "geez, bottle feeding would be easier". But having done both, the reality is, overall, that breastfeeding is much easier.

 

Sleep: You get WAY more sleep if you nurse in bed. Baby wakes up, you pop a breast in her mouth, then go back to sleep. Why do you think God gave you those sleepy breastfeeding hormones? To put you to sleep, so you don't end up a crazy sleep deprived mom! ;-) I know some people freak out about that, but the fact is, the studies that talk about the dangers of co-sleeping are slanted. They include cases of deaths where the baby was left ALONE, unattended, on an adult bed with soft blankets and pillows around, and where the baby could fall off. That is NOT co-sleeping, that's abandoning your child in an unsafe sleep environment! Real studies show that as long as you (or your husband) are not under the influence of drugs or alcohol, co-sleeping with your child is just as safe as the baby sleeping alone in a crib. If you're a heavy sleeper worried about rolling over on the baby, get one of those co-sleeping cribs that attach to the side, or a co-sleeping "bed", that lays on the bed between you and your husband. The plastic sides on the upper part of it prevent roll-over.

 

Cost: Breastfeeding is WAY cheaper than bottle feeding. If you added up the cost of the formula, bottles, dish liquid, other supplies, etc., you'd probably freak out at what you're really spending.

 

Health: Breastmilk is created as the perfect food for babies. True, they survive just fine on formula, but it's up to you whether that's good enough for your precious baby. (And that's not to bash on bottle feeding moms at all, because sometimes you just don't have a choice, I should know.) It's kind of like comparing Chef Boyardee spaghetti to organic fruits and vegetables. Sure, our kids can eat eat that canned stuff and seem to be fine, but the organic, all natural fresh fruits and vegetables are going to be infinitely better for them. It's hard to measure what long-term effects that unnatural foods can have on us. Just something to think about.

 

Survival: As already mentioned, in a survival situation, without formula, you're in serious trouble. Imagine being trapped somewhere with no access to formula, or even ingredients to make "emergency formula". As a breastfed mom, you just need water, and eventually some food for yourself, and you're set. However, even as a breastfed mom, you should have at LEAST one can of formula for emergencies. I would suggest even a few months' supply. Even if you never need it, it would make a great barter item, or something you could use to help others. Or, if your baby is too old to need it and you're sure you'll never have another baby, you could sell the unopened cans on craigslist, if they haven't expired.

 

Comfort: Nothing soothes a sick or upset baby like breastfeeding. It almost instantly soothes them, which makes things much easier for you.

 

Bonding: This is much more important than you'd imagine, especially if you have a c-section. A lot of c-section moms experience a lack of bonding, because you don't get those hormone surges that you get from a natural birth that help in bonding, plus they often whisk the baby away while your surgery is finished up and you go to the recovery room. I've had all c-sections, and breastfeeding has been really important to me.

 

Breastfeeding doesn't always come naturally, and every child is different. I've sought out help with this baby, even though I've breastfed five babies before this, because she was born pre-term and doesn't have the best suck. With some babies, you just need help. Never be afraid to call someone, either a La Leche League leader, or a lactation consultant. They're usually helpful, but some are more helpful than others, so if you don't get the help you need, keep looking til you find the right person. With a couple of my kids, I wasn't able to get the right answers, but the problem eventually worked itself out anyway. Give it six weeks of real effort, before giving up. I think you'll be glad you did.

 

Now that's not to say it will be hard for you. For many women, it's a breeze. Like I said, it depends on the baby...and on the mom. Some of my babies were very easy, other babies, not so much.

 

As far as weaning them, it's usually not a big deal. It depends a lot, I think, on how old your child is when they wean, and how spoiled they are. I know some people might get upset that I say that, but I think it's true. If a child is used to getting what they want, and you nurse them to an older age, they are NOT going to like weaning. Most of my children, having been weaned at around six months (except one) weaned pretty easily. Only one was stubborn. That child did NOT want a bottle! What I did was use one of those really small, skinny medicine syringes that you use to give kids medicine. Wait til the baby is hungry. I would take some breastmilk or formula, stick the syringe into their mouth (might need to squeeze it in at the corner of their mouth, to get it in the back, if they fight it) and squirt a little bit back there. Wait until it's been swallowed, then repeat. The baby will hate it at first, but sooner or later, the baby will start to suck on the syringe. Then you can try to use a bottle. You probably won't have that much trouble, but if you do, that's what I'd recommend. If it's an older baby/child, you'll have to ask someone else, I don't have experience with that!

 

One thing that I'd warn you about...sometimes when you're having a bad day, you'll think about just quitting and giving the baby a bottle. When that happens, give yourself a few days or a week to think about it. I have that thought at least once a week! But I know from experience that as soon as I wean a child, I always wish I'd given it a little more time, and worked a little harder.

 

As for mastitis, I've never had it. It can usually be avoided by educating yourself on what to do to keep your breasts healthy and your milk supply going. Sore nipples, the same thing. Look for the warning signs, and treat yourself as soon as you see them. Often, prevention is the key.

 

If you have trouble with your milk supply, try mother's milk tea, or herbal supplements like Fenugreek, Milk Thistle, etc. Fenugreek should never be taken when pregnant, and can lower your blood sugar...something to be aware of if you have low blood sugar issues already. Pumping can really help. Positioning is important--make sure YOU are comfortable before you start, and use pillows to support yourself and your arms, so you are relaxed. Being relaxed is key. To encourage let down, you can use heat. I used warm, damp cloths with my first child. I kept a crockpot on "warm", with face cloths in them. Squeeze them out and apply them to your breasts for a minute, before you start. Works well.

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i bottle feed all six of my kids. my first one i tried with no luck the hospital gave her 2 bottles before i had a chance to nurse her my second i did not even try , my 3rd i tried to nurse him and he would not eat by the 4th day talked with a breast feeding specialist and she told me my baby was dehydrated to give him formula fast that there must be an underlying issue. so when the 4th one came along i did not try to even nurse. i went for my 6 week check up found out i have a thyroid problem with a thyroid problem some peoples milk never come in. so that was my case i never had no milk come in so my last 2 where bottle feed also. with my last 2 i went on line to ebay and ordered all the formula plus a little extra to last me a year. i keep some at home and at another place in case something happen and we had to leave home all my kids where on prosobee they could not handle the milk base in regular formula. all my kids are fine. my youngest had no ear infections until i but him on whole milk.

 

someone mention on here about pills she took to help her to have more of a milk supply i never heard of that wish i did i think if my milk would of come in i would of nurse my kids

 

i got the bottle liners that where made in the USA and stocked them also. and water.

 

this is just me opinion i would still got some formula to but on the shelf just to have if something should happen like your milk dried up or for other reason just to be on safe side. look on ebay look at the expiration dates and get something that will expire after the baby is one if the baby gets to be close to one you don't use it just sell it back on ebay.

 

only you can decide whats best for you. good luck

and congratulation expecting a baby is a great feeling. pray everything goes well

wish you the best of luck

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Most of the benefits have already been mentioned, but yes, breasfeeding for 2 years or more will reduce your risk of breast cancer. If you breastfeed your daughter you will lower her chances of breast cancer.

 

Breastmilk will cure pink eye and can be used on minor skin cuts.

 

Breastmilk provides antibodies that are crucial to help your little one fight infections.

 

If TEOTWAWKI occurs, most formula fed babies will not make it (lack of clean water.)

 

Breastmilk is far superior to formula in every respect.

 

I've breastfed all 3 of my children, and I nursed through pregnancy. I'm currently tadem nursing a 3 year old and my 14 month old. I work full time and had a partial mastectomy when I was 25, and I make plenty of milk.

 

Consider joining the Le Leche League, as they are a wonderful resource. Also go to http://www.kellymom.com/

 

There is a lot of information on that site! Also, breastfeeding can help reduce the effects if PPD.

 

Of course, breastfeeding is a very personal decision and only you can decide what's best for you and your baby. :)

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Hi Tina,

 

I know you've already received a lot of input, but I wanted to chime in from a "been there, done that" perspective.

 

I was not successful at nursing our first child. She was 100% bottlefed by 3 months of age because of a combination of bad advice and inexperience.

 

Our second child was born in March of 1999, with the uncertainty of Y2K looming. I was absolutely certain that I wanted to breastfeed her for at least 9 months, to get to January 1, 2000 with a reliable food source for her. I received a free can of formula from the hospital when she was born and kept it in a cupboard as part of our "Y2K preps", just in case. Of course, using it would have required a reliable water source, but I didn't feel right about getting rid of it with the uncertainty in the air. I knew that breastfeeding was the only way I could hope to be certain her food was safe.

 

You have already received a lot of input about breastfeeding compared to bottlefeeding, so I won't recap those points. I do want to say that after failing the first time around, I *did* successfully breastfeed our second child ... and our third ... and our fourth ... and our fifth ... and as I type I am nursing our sixth child. :)

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