Jump to content
MrsSurvival Discussion Forums

storing mayonnaise


Recommended Posts

Hi, I am new to prepping and to blogging. Not sure if this is the spot to ask my question...

 

I thought I had a good idea for storing mayo, and bought individual packets at Sam's club. Then I noticed an expiration date on the bottom of the case for august 09! Do you store mayo? How, and how long is it safe? Thanks! Cathy

Link to post

Thats a very good question you have about individual packets of mayo. Mayo is very sensitive to storage conditions and heat. I am hoping Violet or someone very well versed in storing mayonnaise in particular can give you definitive advice concerning this. For myself I would think that if its cool,dry storage is best, but if we lost power and you had no summer airconditioning, how hot would your kitchen or pantry get? Mayo turns bad fast in any heat, as a rule. Still, if stored properly in controlled conditions, perhaps a 2 -3 yr period might be possible. But I make no promises.

Mayo in the jar may store longer in such conditions, but many of the folks here just keep recipes handy for making their own mayo, it is mostly egg whites, in fact, so you may want to do further research on Mrs S, to find those threads in the recipes section. I really don't know about storing the individual packets in such a large quantity, as I only thought so far as to maybe have some packets of various condiments in my BOB which I tend to change seasonally anyway, so it's not set up for super long term storage of foods I would be using. Good luck in your gathering of information. Most of all, the concern is safest methods of food storage.

Link to post
Thats a very good question you have about individual packets of mayo. Mayo is very sensitive to storage conditions and heat. I am hoping Violet or someone very well versed in storing mayonnaise in particular can give you definitive advice concerning this. For myself I would think that if its cool,dry storage is best, but if we lost power and you had no summer airconditioning, how hot would your kitchen or pantry get? Mayo turns bad fast in any heat, as a rule. Still, if stored properly in controlled conditions, perhaps a 2 -3 yr period might be possible. But I make no promises.

Mayo in the jar may store longer in such conditions, but many of the folks here just keep recipes handy for making their own mayo, it is mostly egg whites, in fact, so you may want to do further research on Mrs S, to find those threads in the recipes section. I really don't know about storing the individual packets in such a large quantity, as I only thought so far as to maybe have some packets of various condiments in my BOB which I tend to change seasonally anyway, so it's not set up for super long term storage of foods I would be using. Good luck in your gathering of information. Most of all, the concern is safest methods of food storage.

 

 

Thanks! I am wary of spoiled food, and tend to err on the side of safety! This concept of long-term storage is an unchartered area for me. Cathy

Link to post

I second Arby's suggestion of just keeping the supplies on hand to make it yourself.

I wonder if it could be made with dehydrated eggs instead?

Something to ponder.

 

I do have to say that I'm suprised by the "best by" date though, from the time of purchase, how long is that? Like 6 months or something?

 

Mayonnaise as well as salad dressings are something that I keep a *very* close eye on in my food storage, because, well of the quick expiration dates.

These are really the only two items that I make sure and don't store too many of.

 

Although, I guess if you 'staggered' your puchases, so that they wouldn't all expire during the same month, that could also work?

 

Great topic!

 

 

Michelle in middle Tennessee

Edited by cheles2kids
Link to post
I second Arby's suggestion of just keeping the supplies on hand to make it yourself.

I wonder if it could be made with dehydrated eggs instead?

Something to ponder.

 

I do have to say that I'm suprised by the "best by" date though, from the time of purchase, how long is that? Like 6 months or something?

 

Mayonnaise as well as salad dressings are something that I keep a *very* close eye on in my food storage, because, well of the quick expiration dates.

These are really the only two items that I make sure and don't store too many of.

 

Although, I guess if you 'staggered' your puchases, so that they wouldn't all expire during the same month, that could also work?

 

Great topic!

 

 

Michelle in middle Tennessee

 

Link to post

If you are talking about the kind of little packets you get at fast food places, I would not use those for long term storage at all. I've had too many of those little condiment packages go bad. You know, you have extra ketchup or BBQ Sauce or Mayo packets, so you toss them in the fridge at work or at home.

 

Bleah!!! I think the packaging for the single-serve sizes degrades pretty rapidly.

 

I have no problem keeping extra jars of mayonnaise in my cool, dark pantry closet. I'm just careful to rotate them. And of course, once opened it is refridgerated.

Link to post
If you are talking about the kind of little packets you get at fast food places, I would not use those for long term storage at all. I've had too many of those little condiment packages go bad. You know, you have extra ketchup or BBQ Sauce or Mayo packets, so you toss them in the fridge at work or at home.

 

Bleah!!! I think the packaging for the single-serve sizes degrades pretty rapidly.

 

I have no problem keeping extra jars of mayonnaise in my cool, dark pantry closet. I'm just careful to rotate them. And of course, once opened it is refridgerated.

I guess I will take the mayo back! I found a site for shelf life info stilltasty.com

 

Thanks guys!

Link to post

Mayo can CERTAINLY be made with whole powdered eggs.

 

I use a milkshake whipper.

 

Put a tablespoon of lemon juice (or white vinegar) in a quart-sized mayo jar. Add as much warm water as your egg powder says one egg takes, plus an extra tablespoon of water. Swirl together. Add a pinch of red pepper, or a thick pinch of white pepper, and swirl it in. Add 1/2 teaspoon of salt and 1/2 teaspoon powdered mustard. Stick in the whipper and whip the mustard lumps out. Then put in as much powdered egg as your can says will make one egg. Whip the lumps out. If you want sugar, add a pinch of sugar. Now's the fun part, so if you're using hand power instead of electricity, line up your helpers. Using a thin drizzle, pausing the flow here and there, whip in one cup of oil. You will come pretty close to filling the jar. This isn't as thick and creamy as store-bought mayo, but it goes fine on sandwiches, potatoes, or pasta salads.

 

To make a kind of salad dressing, infuse a clove of garlic (or equivalent dried) in the oil before you beat it in, and either add some powdered milk to the egg powder or use powdered omelet mix, and use a full teaspoon of mustard instead of a half teaspoon. Then add onion powder and interesting spices while you are beating in the oil.

 

Link to post

Hi there,

 

I have had mayonnaise 'head south' on me. There was a gallon I forgot about that I got on sale and somehow got forgotten about in the back of the pantry. I found it a few months back and compared it to a new jar. The expiry date was about a year ago. I peeled back the safety seal and WHHOOOOOSH, nasty! It got pitched 'as is'.

 

Do pay attention to the USE BY dates for mayo. It's generally ok of it's a few months past, but not much more than that.

 

Yet another good reason to rotate items through the pantry and to stock ingredients for homemade mayo. :)

 

I've not seen any site for mayo in particular, but here is the info from the National Center for Food Preservation & Canning out of the University of GA. I think they are so vague because it truly depends on how your item is stored.

 

http://www.uga.edu/nchfp/how/store/ksu_cupboard.pdf

 

Hope this helps.

Link to post

The storage times are based on 70 degrees. Mayonnaise is something that is hard to store for very long. I have an extra fridge in the garage. I keep several jars of mayo in there.

If you want to make your own, you can pasteurize your eggs at home. If you want the info, let me know. Homemade only keeps safely in the fridge for 2 or 3 days, though.

Link to post

Here's two recipes for no egg mayonnaise. Never tried them, but they seem to make sense.

http://www.grouprecipes.com/14764/no-egg-r...mayonnaise.html

http://www.toytowngermany.com//forum/index...showtopic=30476

Link to post

You know, given that neither home-made mayo nor unrefrigerated opened bought mayo would stay good any length of time, it might be useful to make up a list of ways to use it before making/opening it.

 

Tuna salad.

Chicken salad.

Egg salad.

Bread spread for sandwiches (one of my babysitters used to fix white-bread-mayonnaise-cracker sandwiches)

Substitute for butter on garlic bread

Ground with cooked meat and pickled vegetables for sandwiches.

Fruit salad.

Potato salad.

Scalloped potatoes

Pasta salad.

Pasta puttanesca.

Broccoli-rice casserole

That artichoke/spinach/parmesan hot spread.

Slaw if you like it (I don't)

Chocolate cake.

Coating for fried or oven-fried items (to stick on the spiced crumbs/meal and the parmesan)

 

Yeah, it's easy to think of ways to use it up now. But when you have a load of tension and too many variables to juggle?

 

 

Link to post

We eat a lot of mayo.... but, I don't store a lot of mayo because it doesn't store long.

 

If the day comes when we don't have refrigeration, we'll just have to give it up and sub other things that don't spoil so easily. Like mustard in my tuna or on sandwiches. There are a variety of mustards, and generally it stores pretty well.

 

This is one of my favorites, called Durkee Famous Sauce - it has quite a history! Found empty bottles on covered wagon trails and served to President Abraham Lincoln at the White House. It's good stuff! :)

 

http://www.durkee.com/homeuse/spices-famous-sauce.php

Link to post
We eat a lot of mayo.... but, I don't store a lot of mayo because it doesn't store long.

 

If the day comes when we don't have refrigeration, we'll just have to give it up and sub other things that don't spoil so easily. Like mustard in my tuna or on sandwiches. There are a variety of mustards, and generally it stores pretty well.

 

This is one of my favorites, called Durkee Famous Sauce - it has quite a history! Found empty bottles on covered wagon trails and served to President Abraham Lincoln at the White House. It's good stuff! :)

 

http://www.durkee.com/homeuse/spices-famous-sauce.php

 

Thank you all for the information and links and recipes!

Link to post
If you want to make your own, you can pasteurize your eggs at home. If you want the info, let me know. Homemade only keeps safely in the fridge for 2 or 3 days, though.

 

 

Violet, I'd be very interested in that info!!

 

 

MtRider :wave:

Link to post

How to Pasteurize Eggs at Home

 

The more we learn about food safety, the higher our standards become - and, of course, the more things we find to worry about. Take raw eggs, for example. Folks used to think nothing of breaking a raw egg into their morning milkshake for extra vitamins and protein. Raw cookie dough was only a slightly guilty pleasure - like licking the bowl of cake batter. No one thought anything about the safety or lack thereof in Hollandaise or Bearnaise sauce, or homemade mayonnaise. Poached and fried eggs with runny yolks were simply a matter of preference - not a risky choice. Recipes galore call for beaten egg whites - and even whole eggs - that are never cooked. But then we found out about salmonella bacteria - and how dangerous it can be - and even the hardiest among us started to worry.

 

For the very young, the elderly, pregnant women and those with compromised immune systems, raw eggs can be quite dangerous. Even though the FDA says that only about one egg in 20,000 contains salmonella bacteria - the risk is not worth taking if you are among these groups of people - or if you are cooking for them. There is a company that produces pasteurized eggs in the shell - a fabulous solution, because the egg remains as viable as a completely uncooked egg in a recipe - but those pasteurized eggs can be very difficult to find consistently.

 

Now, a solution has come to our attention. It is possible to pasteurize eggs at home - and easily, too! Pasteurization is simply a process of heating a food to a specific temperature for a specific amount of time - designed to kill specific bacteria. It is known that salmonella bacteria are killed at temperatures of 140 degrees in about 3 1/2 minutes (or a higher temperature in less time). If a room temperature egg is held in a bowl of warm water - say, 142 degrees to be safe - for 3 1/2 minutes, the bacteria will be killed. It takes 5 minutes for extra large or jumbo eggs.

 

Place the room temperature eggs in a colander, and lower them into a pan or bowl of 142-degree water. Use an instant-read thermometer to be sure of the water temperature, and leave the thermometer in the water, to be sure that the temoerature is maintained. For medium or large eggs, leave them in the water for 3 1/2 minutes; for extra large or jumbo eggs, allow 5 minutes. Then remove the eggs, dry them, and refrigerate them, in a tightly-covered container.

 

Eggs begin to cook at about 160 degrees, and will be "scrambled eggs" at 180 - but if the 142 degree temperature is maintained, the result is a safe egg that will act like a raw egg in recipes.

 

Link to post

wow, I came here to ask this very question. I found some small bottles of Mayo at Dollar Tree today. I think they were maybe 6oz or so. The use by date was a year from now.

 

I thought they'd be great for storage since opening a big jar wouldn't be practical without electricity. But I wanted to know the real longevity of it, how it would hold up in the long term.

 

Doesn't look promising, especially here in the hot humid south. Dang.

 

I may get a few for hurricane season anyway.

Link to post

Our mayonnaise is made from fresh eggs and EVOO and raw whey, and keeps in the fridge for about 2 weeks. It MUST be made with raw whey, though, or else this doesn't work.

Take two room temperature eggs. In a blender, mixer with whip attachment or food processor, mix one yolk and one whole egg with mustard, salt, pepper, and any flavorings you want. Drizzle olive oil in slowly, between one to two cups, usually half way there is what I use. As you blend, it will become thick and light colored. At the very end, stir in the raw whey. You can use sunflower oil or light olive oil if the olive is too "olive-y" tasting.

 

The raw whey is made by taking raw cow's milk and leaving it on the counter at 60-70 degrees until it separates, usually 1-2 days. The thick part is cream cheese, the watery part is whey and is used to lacto ferment vegetables, or make dressings. The beneficial bacteria will help keep spoilage organisms at bay. I also would never make this with store bought eggs, but that's just me. If I don't know exactly where my raw food came from (i.e. my property) then I don't eat it, or I cook it.

 

 

Link to post
It MUST be made with raw whey, though, or else this doesn't work.

 

 

I'm askin' because I don't know :) Why does it need to be raw specifically?

 

I've used kefir whey made from store bought milk to lacto ferment a lot of stuff and it's worked fine.

Link to post

I guess you got me there... I'm specifically talking about the spoilage enzymes. If you were to use whey leftover from cooked cheese or something along those lines, it would be dead and therefore no more helpful than adding water. Kefir whey would be fine as the kefir has added back in beneficial yeasts and bacteria.

Link to post
I guess you got me there... I'm specifically talking about the spoilage enzymes. If you were to use whey leftover from cooked cheese or something along those lines, it would be dead and therefore no more helpful than adding water. Kefir whey would be fine as the kefir has added back in beneficial yeasts and bacteria.

 

Okie doke, thank you :)

 

 

eta: I get it, lol

Edited by Prickle
Link to post
I have bought kefir granules on eBay, but they didn't do anything. My DH loves kefir, but it's so expensive. Where did you get your start?

 

I got mine on ebay too.

 

Most recently I got them from this vendor. The ones I got from her make a really nice Kefir:

 

http://cgi.ebay.com/Fresh-Milk-Kefir-Grain...93%3A1|294%3A50

 

Did you get powdered granules or did you get wet kefir grains, that look kinda like pieces of cauliflower?

Edited by Prickle
Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.