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I got honey!


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MommaDogs was nice enough to get me set up with 2 hives late this spring when they came to visit and pick up their puppy.

 

While they were here, we met the nicest lady down at the bee store who just happened to live right down the road from me, who has stopped by a couple of times to help show me certain things. She had stopped by last week and when we opened up the super, there was a ton of honey in it.

 

Today, she taught me how to harvest honey and I'm in the process of draining the honey. I should end up with about 8 quarts of honey from the one super. Since I got started late this year, the bees weren't able to produce as much but I'm glad that it was a smaller operation this year because there's been so much to learn.

 

I'm so happy MommaDogs talked me into getting bees and helped me get set up, and I'm absolutely thrilled I have some fresh, raw honey!

 

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All I wear is the netted hat contraption. The lady that came to help me suited up in the full garb...body suit, hat/face protection and gloves. She's very allergic to the bees so that's wise that she do that...I'm just comfortable around them and haven't been bit...yet.

 

lol

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I'm creeped out just thinking about it. I haven't gotten over my encounter with yellowjackets a few years ago. I'm sure honeybees don't compare.

I am very impressed with all you people who are doing these kinds of things. You're very inspiring!

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That is very dang cool. I was talking to a fellow once who's grand dad kept bees. They had a contraption u hand crank and put the comb in the center which looked like a sieve. It slung the honey into something like a funnel and that went into buckets. It was cast iron.

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BGM, as with anything, when we get educated about something, the fear and the unknowns disappear. Sometimes you just have to keep your eye on the goal (the honey) and be willing to learn all that necessary to accomplish that goal.

 

Raising the bees isn't that difficult. Sure, there's complications that can happen, just as there is with everything, but for those that are concerned about getting stung, all you have to do is suit up and then you're fully protected.

 

Here's a site I found just doing a quick search on google...you can do some more research yourself if you'd like. Do a search on the bee clubs in your area, which will help you to meet people that are already doing it, and who will be more than willing to come over and show you the ropes. I will say that out of all the additions I've made to my farm, the bees are at the top of the list. They have increased production in my garden and they give me honey. I have experienced no negatives and like I said above, if one is concerned about getting stung, then the solution to that is to suit up, which removes that possibility, which in turn, leaves no valid fear argument to not get bees, if one can.

 

http://www.honeybee.com/beeinfo.htm

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Darned it all....Now I'm green-eyed!!

 

Brother has a hive in his back yard and harvested last week. I told him to save me a quart for Christmas present. LOL

 

I keep seeing wild bees all over our yard, so I know there's a hive nearby, but darned if I can find it. I think they are so fun to watch... Hubby, on the other hand, wants nothing to do with them. :( He's adimant that having a hive anywhere near the kids would spell disaster.

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I keep seeing wild bees all over our yard, so I know there's a hive nearby, but darned if I can find it. I think they are so fun to watch... Hubby, on the other hand, wants nothing to do with them. :( He's adimant that having a hive anywhere near the kids would spell disaster.

 

I guess the same could be firearms. Tell hubby it's probably best to remove any and all out of the house...

 

For the children's sakes, of course.

 

lol

 

I've had them for 6 months now and none of my children have gotten stung. The bees are too busy flying miles around, collecting pollen to make their honey. As with all things, education helps remove the fear of things not understood or known.

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I guess the same could be firearms. Tell hubby it's probably best to remove any and all out of the house...

 

For the children's sakes, of course.

 

lol

 

I've had them for 6 months now and none of my children have gotten stung. The bees are too busy flying miles around, collecting pollen to make their honey. As with all things, education helps remove the fear of things not understood or known.

Hmmm , An intersting analogy. I hadn't thought of that. ...but I may use it. LOL

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WOW! good job.

isn't homemade honey the BEST! I bet you were licking your fingers as you were getting the honey ready for the jars? ;)

 

*question in the 3rd photo is what looks like a strainer with sticks? is it something you bought or 'jimmyriged' to work for you? I like it!

 

And the good part is the bees are 'working' for you ! Both in helping pollinate your plants so you get better vegetables and flowers and then they thank you by giving you honey.

 

 

:AmishMichaelstraw:

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*question in the 3rd photo is what looks like a strainer with sticks? is it something you bought or 'jimmyriged' to work for you? I like it!

 

Yeah, that was something I jury rigged at the last minute when I realized my strainer was too small to hang high enough on the pot. I just took 2 bamboo skewers and slid them through the mesh like you saw, to add some width to hold the strainer up high enough to drain the honey.

 

And yes, I licked my fingers all the way through...the honey is the best I've ever had....of course, I've never had it fresh right out of the comb like that either lol.

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Yeah, that was something I jury rigged at the last minute when I realized my strainer was too small to hang high enough on the pot. I just took 2 bamboo skewers and slid them through the mesh like you saw, to add some width to hold the strainer up high enough to drain the honey.

 

There you go thinking again ;)

 

That is just what most of will have to do............. wtshtf.

 

 

 

:AmishMichaelstraw:

 

 

 

 

 

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One year I worked at the State Fair in an out door food stand we had fountain cokes the honey bees loved to get the drippings they were all over . They would be all over my hands as I poured cokes they never did bite me.

So I would never swat them away and they stayed happy and so did I.

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:cheer: CONGRADULATIONS DARLENE!!! We've had bees for years and I remember our 1st robbery. I felt so proud and satisfied with the harvest. I couldn't believe how much honey came from one super. We had a friend who had a 3 frame spinner that spun out the honey. Did you do that? Spin your honey out of the comb? It saves your foundation for the next honey flow.

 

Is there a Bee Club near you? Where in GA do you live?

 

Don't throw any thing away that comes from your hive. Save the propolus, and wax for making soap and lip balms and lotions. I use it all.

 

I'm glad you have support in helping you. Where do you get your suppies from? There is a good catalog we use here in eastern AL called Brushy Mountain Bee Farm. Their in Moravian Falls, NC. www.brushymountainbeefarm.com They have the best prices and service we have found. Plus when you get a cat., there is a calendar of what to do when that is helpful.

 

I have a good easy recipe for spun honey if you like. Spun honey is so expensive in the health food stores. It's nice to know we can make it at home.

 

Have Fun.

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WOW!!! bees are something i have thought about for awhile--just don't know anyone to teach me--i even have a cookbook where all the recipes are with honey--you are SO lucky

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Cleanheart...

 

I didn't have a spinner to extract the honey...I just cut the comb and squeezed it by hand over a wire mesh strainer and let gravity filter the honey into the pot underneath.

 

There's not a bee club immediately by me but in a couple of counties away there is. I'm up in the N. GA mountains.

 

I've saved alot of the wax and stuff but don't know what to do with it lol. I don't have a wax melter to melt it down so I've just put it in a container for now. You'll hafta share in more detail how you use the waxes.

 

I've been getting my supplies at a little shop down in Ellijay. Their daughter works there and happens to live down the road from me and has come over a couple of times to help teach me 'this or that'. I went and looked at the site you shared and they have some really kewl stuff at reasonable prices, so thanks for that link...I plan on ordering from them. I also signed up for their catalogue so I'm looking forward to that.

 

Anyway, cough up that spun honey recipe...I'm having a blast learning new things with this honey! I've never made it before and would love to learn how to do so.

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Oh that is awesome, Darlene!

 

DH and I are interested in beekeeping, and there is an active bee club in our area. We may go for it come spring time.

 

Did you know that Harriett Beecher Stowe and her sister Catherine Beecher advocated beekeeping as a way for woman to have an independent income? I have a copy of their book American Woman's Home. The book was published in 1869!

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Well, I finally had time to come back on and looky here what I see. How very cool!

 

I am most excited that you are excited and hope that your enthusiasm will catch someone else to get bees. We need all the beekeepers we can get.

 

This is what you do with your wax. First make sure you have a bunch of 1-4oz jars, I use small candle jars I got at the take it or leave it building at my dump... but they sell them cheaply enough. Lisa may be able to direct you.

 

The temperature must be exact. And be ready to pour as soon as you combine the two ingredients, it almost instantly becomes soft hand cream... it's the best I've ever used. They sell it up here for quite a bit.

 

Beeswax Handcream

Yield about 13 - 15 2 oz. containers

 

5 ounces Beeswax 16 ounces mineral oil

1-1/3 cup distilled water 2 teaspoons Borax (the soap, not the chemical)

 

Mix half of the mineral oil and beeswax in a pan on the stove stirring constantly until all of the wax is melted. Then add the rest of the mineral oil Bring this to 159 degrees F.

 

At the same time mix the Borax and distilled water in a Pyrex 4 cup glass container. Stir in the Borax and bring to 159 degrees F in the microwave.

 

When both are at 159 degrees, pour the mineral oil/wax mixture into the Pyrex container of borax and distilled water. Mix quickly and pour the compound directly into 2 oz. containers.

 

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I've always done it exactly as it specified... but recently decided to try coconut oil. Give it a shot and let us know how it turns out. If and when I do the CO I will post it also. It is a very tight tolerance recipe, which is why exactly 159 degrees. When you combine the ingredients, it instantly foams and then settles and becomes a cream. Not sure if the MO has a role in that or not.

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