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Wagons Ho Recipes


Mother

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Does cooking in aluminum foil count? You can combine potatoes, onion, carrots, any meat and any other vegetables you like along with salt, pepper and any additional seasonings and wrap in aluminum foil. They can be cooked in coals or on top of a grate. The juices from the meat help flavor the vegetables. The great part is no clean up of pans! I also do them on the grill and in the oven.

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How to make Cast Iron Pan Candy:

 

1 cup of butter

1 cup of brown sugar, packed

1 teaspoon vanilla

 

Melt butter in a cast iron pan over medium-low heat.

 

Add brown sugar.

 

Continue to cook, stirring constantly, for 15 minutes as sugar gradually blends with the butter. At this point, turn it up a little, to medium. At first it looks as if the butter is separating from the brown sugar. Keep cooking and stirring non-stop–the butter and brown sugar will meld together as the mixture thickens.

 

Be careful not to overcook and burn it–you should finish with a nice, rich caramelized color. In the last few minutes, stir in the vanilla. Butter waxed paper very lightly to prevent sticking before pouring the candy out.

 

Let the candy cool and set up. After it’s firm but before it’s completely set, cut it into pieces. Then you can shape it, roll it, twist it, whatever you want to do to pretty it up. Store in an airtight container.

 

You can also stir pecans in this and have something like a praline.

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Betty, taking that idea into the survival/wilderness mode, you can use all sorts of leaves to cook in.

 

The standard vegetable leaves like Cabbage, kale, chard, mustard, romaine, squash, pumpkin, and etc are all good for cooking in the coals. Grape leaves, either wild or domestic as long as they are not sprayed are a favorite with greek cooking.

 

Plantain, violets, and almost any edible greens with larger leaves will work and sometimes it's a good way to use older leaves. Even if the leaf is not big enough, small edible leaves can be picked in bunches on the stalk and used to wrap foods for cooking. You can often use a stalk to tie the leaves in place. Just be sure to wrap them thickly enough that as the leaves cook they don't fall apart losing your food to the fire. Sea weed works well.

 

Some trees, like birch, beech, sassafras, and citrus give us edible leaves or the inner, cambium bark layer can be peeled for use as food or wraps to cook in.

 

:bighug2:

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Wait, Mother! Please tell me more!

 

Betty, taking that idea into the survival/wilderness mode, you can use all sorts of leaves to cook in.

 

The standard vegetable leaves like Cabbage, kale, chard, mustard, romaine, squash, pumpkin, and etc are all good for cooking in the coals. Grape leaves, either wild or domestic as long as they are not sprayed are a favorite with greek cooking.

 

Plantain, violets, and almost any edible greens with larger leaves will work and sometimes it's a good way to use older leaves. Even if the leaf is not big enough, small edible leaves can be picked in bunches on the stalk and used to wrap foods for cooking. You can often use a stalk to tie the leaves in place. Just be sure to wrap them thickly enough that as the leaves cook they don't fall apart losing your food to the fire. Sea weed works well.

 

Some trees, like birch, beech, sassafras, and citrus give us edible leaves or the inner, cambium bark layer can be peeled for use as food or wraps to cook in.

 

:bighug2:

 

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Ah Boy, ambergris, that was off the top of my head but I know there are lots of places on the web that give recipes for cooking with leaves. I've experimented with all sorts of edible leaves though and some we've liked some flavored the filling too much. I often save some of the biggest cabbage leaves, blanching them and putting them in the freezer. They hold up the best in cooking in the coals though Grape leaves work well too you just have to make smaller packets and watch the coals closer. I use aleady cooked fillings like rice and potatoes and cooked meats so the time is shorter.

 

I also use fresh green edible leaves or green corn husks to line a hole dug near the edge of a fire that has been burning a while. I make sure they line the sides well so no dirt gets into the food. I place larger pieces of food on the leaves, like chunks of potatoes, carrots, meat, etc. and then cover those with more leaves. I put the lid from my cast iron pot upside down or a pie pan on the top and put a few hot coals on them but I have used green bark to do it. It acts like an oven. You have to be careful uncovering them and taking the food out but it's doable and no mess if you use bark.

Does that help a bit more???

 

:bighug2:

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Maybe I remember incorrectly (big surprise, huh?), but I think Violet said dried meat was not good because you can get sick. I THINK she said only to make beef jerky and there is a specific way to do it.

 

Definitely a risk if the meat is not properly dried.

 

USDA Info on Dried Meat:

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/FactSheets/Jerky_...afety/index.asp

Why is Temperature Important When Making Jerky? Illnesses due to Salmonella and E. coli O157:H7 from homemade jerky raise questions about the safety of traditional drying methods for making beef and venison jerky. The USDA Meat and Poultry Hotline's current recommendation for making jerky safely is to heat meat to 160 °F and poultry to 165 °F before the dehydrating process. This step assures that any bacteria present will be destroyed by wet heat. But most dehydrator instructions do not include this step, and a dehydrator may not reach temperatures high enough to heat meat to 160 °F.

 

After heating, maintain a constant dehydrator temperature of 130 to 140 °F during the drying process is important because:

the process must be fast enough to dry food before it spoils; and

it must remove enough water that microorganisms are unable to grow.

 

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  • 1 month later...

I had a pm about the 54321 sauce. I was given this recipe by my former boss from NOLA she was born in mainland China and this is one my favorite of her dishes.

 

I am saying parts in this because you can make as much or as little as you want. When I make it I usually use a 1/4 cup. My family loves this sauce.

 

5 parts soy sauce

4 parts water

3 parts sugar (you can use honey)

2 parts vinegar

1 part red wine

 

(for the vinegar and red wine I have used red wine vinegar and used just 2 parts and 1 extra part water the guys didn't complain and there were no left overs)

 

Usually mix all of this together and pour over chicken and bake it or over a roast in the crock pot. Then I serve the juice over rice. Hubby loves to eat just rice and the juice.

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Machaca

 

Machaca, which comes from the verb form machacado (pounded or crushed), is a dish that was prepared originally from dried, spiced meat (most commonly beef) that had been rehydrated and pounded to make it tender. The reconstituted meat would then be used to prepare any number of dishes. While drying meat is one of the oldest forms of preservation, the drying of beef with chiles and other native spices was developed by the ranchers and cowboys of northern Mexico.

Soaked & mashed dried jerky (or fresh/left over beef cooked until it is mush)

1 - 2 Tbs. tomato bullion

1 Tbs. dried onion

1 can diced tomato

1 Tbs. oregano

1 tsp. garlic

1 tsp. cayenne (or more if you like hot food)

1/8 cup smoked flavoring (or cook over an open fire instead)

1 tsp salt & pepper

 

Add enough water to boil for 1/2 hour until almost all of the water evaporates. Spoon into a tortilla and enjoy.

 

 

Sorry, I'm not too scientific about the recipe, I learned it from a friend. It's a hit a parties and my DH loves it when I make it either on the stove, in the pressure cooker or over the camp fire.

 

 

OMG this sounds wonderful. Since we are big fans of Tex-Mex (years spent living in Houston, TX will do that to ya) this sounds like something that will be added to the recipe book.

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  • 11 years later...
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