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Wagons Ho COMMENTS (Part 2)


Cat

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Thanks Cat. I didn't even notice how large it had grown.

 

Okay everyone. Lots of info in that last comment thread. And don't forget that Michael's IRN/UN calendar there to print out as well that will give us an idea of our dates in the Big Valley. (Um I also understand that it's available for $10 from Michael in the valley LOL)

 

:bighug2:

Edited by Mother
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That's okay Annarchy, I had her on the wrong end of that river too. Go west and you'll find her at the other end. :D Pretty bad when our nurse is hiding out in the trees. :24: (I have misplaced more people on this trip, I'm going to get fired.)

 

I'm hoping that the fresh air, sunshine, hard work, and fresh food will have me in top form before long but just in case, I wouldn't mind periodic WELLNESS checkups. We'll pay her or MrMt_R in food and comestibles and other commodities. :)

Edited by Mother
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LOOK WHAT I FOUND!

 

It is so cool . . . . . . can I say that? :thumbs:

 

 

You take the quiz adn find out if you can chop dpwn a tree!

It is a bit long but TONS of information about the safe way to cut a tree down.

SOMETHING all us wagoneers need to know how to do! and a few of you readers might like to gove it a try?

 

http://www.fieldandstream.com/quizzes/coul...p-down-tree-axe

 

*I missed 3 but #17 only had a true and the anser was false (your see it when you get there)

But it say I was in the upper 2% so I guess I am good to go. ;)

 

the best part is it gives you the answer adn tells you WHY it was the right answer-

So get over there and show us what you are made of . LOL

 

Tree chopper - :AmishMichael2:

 

 

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I'm in the top 4%. Didn't know I knew that much. Guess I've been around a lot of tree cutting over the last 45 some years that we've heated totally with wood.

 

You're right Michael, there was no winning number 17

 

That had lots of good info, thanks for posting it.

 

:bighug2:

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I am right up there with you Mother. I don't count 17 so out of 19 I got 17 correct.

 

With the new semester starting I am going to have very limited time at work and with this cold when I get home all I think about is eating and going to bed so for the next couple of weeks I will not be posting daily. But when I do post it will probably be long post.

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(((((MT3B))))) I'll be looking forward to your posts.

 

Annarchy,,,,what a SUPER idea. Adobe!

 

We've really got a variety of living quarters here. Michael with his log structure, MT3B and Q trying to resurrect existing buildings, Annarchy with the Adobe, us with caves and log combination. We're not sure what CeeGee will be working on yet and any others who join in but we've got a great start.

 

If the others are like me they are just beginning to sort out what they actually would be doing if they were building this 'homestead' in the wilderness IRL. Writing about it can be even more challenging as we try to balance trying to define our daily life of finding foods, cooking, laundry, cleaning, and etc with building, digging and plowing gardens and fields, and planting. Just like life on the trail, sometimes life becomes monotonous and seems boring yet those were the very things that our pioneer/settler ancestors wrote about in their own journals. Like theirs, ours will turn out to be chronicles of fulfillment of our dreams. In reading them we get to “see” the lives of the writers. We get to ‘live’ it with them.

 

 

I am thoroughly enjoying each post. I feel like I’m not only able to fulfill my own dream by writing but am living your dream as well. It is SUCH FUN! Keep up the good work everyone.

 

:bighug2:

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(((((MT3B))))) I'll be looking forward to your posts.

 

Annarchy,,,,what a SUPER idea. Adobe!

 

We've really got a variety of living quarters here. Michael with his log structure, MT3B and Q trying to resurrect existing buildings, Annarchy with the Adobe, us with caves and log combination. We're not sure what CeeGee will be working on yet and any others who join in but we've got a great start.

 

If the others are like me they are just beginning to sort out what they actually would be doing if they were building this 'homestead' in the wilderness IRL. Writing about it can be even more challenging as we try to balance trying to define our daily life of finding foods, cooking, laundry, cleaning, and etc with building, digging and plowing gardens and fields, and planting. Just like life on the trail, sometimes life becomes monotonous and seems boring yet those were the very things that our pioneer/settler ancestors wrote about in their own journals. Like theirs, ours will turn out to be chronicles of fulfillment of our dreams. In reading them we get to "see" the lives of the writers. We get to 'live' it with them.

 

[/size]

 

I am thoroughly enjoying each post. I feel like I'm not only able to fulfill my own dream by writing but am living your dream as well. It is SUCH FUN! Keep up the good work everyone.

 

:bighug2:

 

LOL you just gave away my whole next post in one paragraph! Shame on you! :lol::hug3:

 

Mt3b it will be nice to have you posting to the story even if life is getting hectic out your way. That makes it all the nicer to know you took time out of your very busy day to think about us all and join in with us on the story. :hug3:

 

 

I can't wait to read how Annarchy builds their place! And am really enjoying reading about how Michael and Lori are doing theirs.

 

Well off to work on my next part...

 

Q (covering her journal so Mother can't read it hehehe)

Edited by quiltys41
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:Blushing: Ummm sorry, I just happened to be walking by and just happened to look over your shoulder and well, wasn't nice of me to give it away though.

 

BUT WRITE IT ANYWAY in case I missed some of it. :D (hard to read over a shoulder with these bad eyes you know)

 

:bighug2:

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Some of us may have call for a chink recipe. This is one that I had found while we were home schooling and we were doing a pioneer project. It is from a 1975 edition of Mother Earth News.

 

I will say this it did work but we lived in Alabama and had lots of red clay around which we used. I am not sure how well it works with plain dirt. But the dog house we built using this held together just fine.

 

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Do-It-Yours...-Log-Cabin.aspx

 

I have a notebook dedicated to log cabins. We hope to one day build a one room cabin on some land in the mountains as a retirement place for me and SF. So I have been researching and collecting information. They also had an article on building a small cabin

 

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Green-Homes.../Log-Cabin.aspx

 

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Nature-Comm...uild-Cabin.aspx

 

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Modern-Home...Cost-Cabin.aspx

 

http://www.motherearthnews.com/Nature-Comm...Cost-Cabin.aspx

 

There are more but these are just a few that I have added to my notebook.

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I know you're in a valley, but the elevation is still quite high.

My recipes and mixes always have adjustments for high elevations, and I've lived at sea level for decades so would have some trouble.

Is anyone having difficulty breathing or getting water to boil/ baked goods to work correctly?

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Is anyone having difficulty breathing or getting water to boil/ baked goods to work correctly?

 

 

:laughkick: No......I've just come DOWN SIX THOUSAND FEET from where I was living in the CO Rockies. I'm breathing just fine, thanks for asking. :laughkick:

 

 

 

MtRider [ eagles for neighbors IRL up here...really! ]

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I know you're in a valley, but the elevation is still quite high.

My recipes and mixes always have adjustments for high elevations, and I've lived at sea level for decades so would have some trouble.

Is anyone having difficulty breathing or getting water to boil/ baked goods to work correctly?

 

 

We covered that in the last section when we started up hill, I posted about it. That was my thought when we started climbing the hill I am used to cooking at 150 feet elevation.

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Found it! Post 95, thanks mommato3boys. I thought there was something on the elevation, just didn't look back far enough.

Climbing to 3,000-4,000 feet.

-

Found this: ( http://allrecipes.com/HowTo/High-Altitude-...ing/Detail.aspx )

"GUIDE FOR CAKE BAKING AT HIGH ALTITUDES

Adjustment for 3000 feet:

* Reduce baking powder: for each teaspoon decrease 1/8 teaspoon.

* Reduce sugar: for each cup, decrease 0 to 1 tablespoon.

* Increase liquid: for each cup, add 1 to 2 tablespoons.

* Increase oven temperature by 25 degrees F. "

http://www.fsis.usda.gov/factsheets/high_a...afety/index.asp

-

Does that sound right to those of you used to high elevations?

Reducing the baking powder and sugar will help to stretch stored food, so that's a good thing for those who's supplies didn't reach them.

-

I hope I'm not being a pain, these are things I think about when I imagine we're there with you.

Edited by Leah
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You are NOT being a pain Leah. You are helping us to make this as authentic as we can. We can also use this in our writing. If it's going to take longer for the pot to boil we need to allow for that or,,,,well, be late with a meal. :D

 

I love these comments. They really help us think things through and after all, that's what this is all about.

 

:bighug2:

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Not a pain at ALL, hon! :grouphug: I love your participation. [i think you should arrive in your own wagon with a small group sent on after us by Jacob and Joy..... ;) ]

 

As for boiling water, one thing you have to remember about the bubbles. Now, I assume it also applies in the ...ahem, lower elevations like 3,000' but the deal is this. It will begin to bubble and roll BUT it has not reached the traditional temperature of "boiling-at-sea level". That means if you are wanting to purify water at {pssst...what temperature does boiling indicate to low landers? } ______ degrees, then bubbles are not an accurate indicator.

 

There must be some formula on this....for mountain hikers? We just let it boil away longer before putting the pasta in or whatever. It means more will evaporate, btw. And [again, not sure if this is higher like us] WHEN the pasta goes in ---- it gets all fizzy and froths right outta the pot. Unless you stir with an empty spoon and them quickly pour in the pasta or whatever, you're going to lose a LOT of your water over the sides. It took me forEVER to remember that when I moved here. Drown the stove repeatedly. ...or, drown the campfire, in our case. :campfire:

 

Many folks use those alterations but... :shrug: I never did. I'm not an all-star cook tho. :lol: When baking cookies, we use a double layer cookie sheet tho. [ or two cookie sheets on top of one another] or you burn them before they're done. AND we cover brownies/cakes etc with aluminum foil and cut out the center -- leaving about an inch covering the edges. Cuz the edges get too done before the middle is cooked.

 

 

MtRider :wave:

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OOOhhhhhh, excellent! That explains a lot! <I can't bake worth a squat using the box/recipe temperatures. Why didn't I think of that? duh>

 

We're at 3,600, in order to successfully bake anything, most of the time I have to lower the temperature 25-50 degrees and increase the time by 10-15 minutes. Countless times I've cut the edges off and used aluminum foil to cover the edges. Black bottomed biscuits and burnt pie crusts are a speciality of mine, LOL

 

Thanks Leah. You're a gem.

 

 

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I hope I'm not being a pain, these are things I think about when I imagine we're there with you.

 

Pain? NO WAY!!!! Thanks to your comments we have been able to look at some things in a different way and find answers plus you have come up with some things that we have over looked.

 

The only reason I remember about the altitude is I was posting on night and the one of the boys come through and asked if he needed to use the high altitude recipe. :o

 

And yes I have problem breathing at higher altitude. Even just changing it by 400 feet. When we went to B'ham I did a lot of walking and had to go at a slower pace because I couldn't catch my breath.

Edited by mommato3boys
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Annarchy, I've long been intrested in the adobe construction. In reading about the thermal mass I was reminded of the underground home we lived in for 18 years. It's mass of cement and underground placement made it almost too effective as thermal storage. Because it was insulated from the sun, unllike adobe, it's thermal heat was derived from the solar gain from south facing windows and the wood furnace and franklin fireplace. It would soak that heat up all day long in the winter time,then it would often be cold feeling just before bedtime despite the fire. About two in the morning it would be giving off it's stored radient heat into the rooms and we would find ourselves almost too hot but by morning, because the wood furnace would have died down in the night, it would be cold again.

 

It took us years to realize that the solar and heat gain was not well calibrated with the thermal storage power. We needed more solar gain. When the prepoured concrete slabs of the roof started to leak and we replaced the dirt with an upper frame construction story the whole picture changed. It's amazing what some building materials can do.

 

Log construction will be the same way. The thicker the logs, the more thermal storage up to a point depending on the number and size of the windows and their insulation value. The caves we are using, if closed in, would maintain a constant ground temperature all year long, usually the average annual temperature for any given area. Because the ones I'm using are neither far into the hillside nor deep into the ground it will be different but still warmer in winter and cooler in summer.

 

I know that adobe works well in hot climates that are cooler at night. Do you know if they have been used in colder climates and how they work there?

 

I'm learning so much from this thread. I've never cooked in elevated atmosphere so I had not thought about the difference in boiling or baking ability.

 

It explains why I burned so many biscuits on the trail :24: ..

 

 

Hey, everyone, be sure to stay tuned for the Sunday plowing demonstration and practice. That should be interesting, fun, and educational.

 

:bighug2:

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I hope I'm not being a pain, these are things I think about when I imagine we're there with you.

 

Pain? NO WAY!!!! Thanks to your comments we have been able to look at some things in a different way and find answers plus you have come up with some things that we have over looked.

 

The only reason I remember about the altitude is I was posting on night and the one of the boys come through and asked if he needed to use the high altitude recipe. :o

 

And yes I have problem breathing at higher altitude. Even just changing it by 400 feet. When we went to B'ham I did a lot of walking and had to go at a slower pace because I couldn't catch my breath.

 

 

I will second just about all of that! Leah, I love the comments and stuff you add! No way are you a pain! It helps jog the memory and makes us think about different things, sort of gets us out of our ruts! :happy0203:

 

Here's a link to my recipe for the biscuits I have been making in the story and IRL http://mrssurvival.com/forums/index.php?au...E=03&id=112 I put directions in there for both regular baking and for baking in a dutch oven outside for camping, etc... I think somebody asked me for it but I can't remember who it was LOL... and I am not even 50 yet, geeze.

 

Will try and post some tonight. I have been so busy though I haven't had time to write plus it was Sabbath too. I love all the posts yall made, now if I could just catch up lol.

 

Q

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