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Haiti... What have you learned from this?

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Did you see there were other earthquakes pretty much directly west/southwest of Haiti? According to these maps, the red line indicates the plate line, so they are continuing west from the Haiti quakes.

 

Tuesday, January 12 - Magnitude 7.0 - HAITI REGION

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/rec...s/10/285_20.php

 

Monday, January 18 - Magnitude 5.8 - OFFSHORE GUATEMALA

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/rec...s/10/270_15.php

 

Tuesday, January 19 (today) - Magnitude 5.8 - CAYMAN ISLANDS REGION

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/earthquakes/rec...s/10/280_20.php

 

http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/recenteqsww/

 

 

 

The New Madrid fault line sits there... waiting, waiting. What have you learned from watching the Haitian tragedy?

 

*Clean water is essential.

 

*Keep on hand food that can be eaten without much preparation - even peanut butter and crackers are better than nothing.

 

*Medical supplies on site should be easily available.

 

*Aftershocks continue and will bring down already shaky structures.

 

*Looters will take advantage of ANY situation, as will robbers. (How many of those women and children so publicly given food and water "first" were robbed on their way back to their shelters?)

 

*Would your supplies survive? Do you need an outdoor-and-crushproof emergency shelter/cache? Even an old refrigerator in an outdoor shed could hold extra supplies.

 

*Don't count on governmental help in local, state, OR national... they must first "assess and coordinate the situation" while you're hurting immediately. And they will FIRST help their own.

 

*Assume communication is cut... will your family know where to look, who to contact, where to meet up? HAVE A PLAN.

 

 

What more? Thoughts? Ideas?

 

 

 

 

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We are in N AR, close enough to the New Madrid to make me think often of the possibilities. Haiti really keeps it in the forefront. I met a couple who live at the very center of the NM, and they told me they don't really worry, what can you do anyway if it hits. I just dropped the subject.

 

Presently, I am trying to pay more attention to what gets stored where, and thinking of losing all my canning jars is too much. We sorta have a plan, all close adults will endeavor to reach only grandchild if she is at school. Meet back at our house, which is only about 3 or 4 miles from the school. Don't know how we will know if someone already has her or how that will be done if no communication. We do have bicycles in the family, and hopefully they could be used by some. How do you really plan for something that big. Just, as best we can. We will not be waiting for the gov to help, for sure.

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We are in the New Madrid area of Indiana to close for comfort. This is something I have been thinking more about the last week. Other than taking half of our things out side and storing I can't think of any other options. There are somethings like dd's med equipment that we don't have extra's of that we have to keep in the house. But having extra food, first aid kit, camping equipment, flash lights, extra copies of important papers, and water could be done pretty easy. I think we will have to make this a priority.

 

Alot of our family live within walking distance of us. The question would be can they get home assuming they are not injured. Communication will be a problem period.

 

This is another good reason to keep a bob in the vehical for everyone. I keep three days of supplies for each person in the bags plus a tent in each vehical.

 

We can only do so much for something this big but, it's good to know God is in control.

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http://quake.usgs.gov/prepare/factsheets/NewMadrid/

The Mississippi Valley-"Whole Lotta Shakin' Goin' On"

In the winter of 1811-12, the central Mississippi Valley was struck by three of the most powerful earthquakes in U.S. history. Even today, this region has more earthquakes than any other part of the United States east of the Rocky Mountains. Government agencies, universities, and private organizations are working to increase awareness of the earthquake threat and to reduce loss of life and property in future shocks.

The 400 terrified residents in the town of New Madrid (Missouri) were abruptly awakened by violent shaking and a tremendous roar. It was December 16, 1811, and a powerful earthquake had just struck. This was the first of three magnitude-8 earthquakes and thousands of aftershocks to rock the region that winter.

Survivors reported that the earthquakes caused cracks to open in the earth's surface, the ground to roll in visible waves, and large areas of land to sink or rise. The crew of the New Orleans (the first steamboat on the Mississippi, which was on her maiden voyage) reported mooring to an island only to awake in the morning and find that the island had disappeared below the waters of the Mississippi River. Damage was reported as far away as Charleston, South Carolina, and Washington, D.C.

 

These dramatic accounts clearly show that destructive earthquakes do not happen only in the western United States. In the past 20 years, scientists have learned that strong earthquakes in the central Mississippi Valley are not freak events but have occurred repeatedly in the geologic past. The area of major earthquake activity also has frequent minor shocks and is known as the New Madrid seismic zone.

 

Earthquakes in the central or eastern United States affect much larger areas than earthquakes of similar magnitude in the western United States. For example, the San Francisco, California, earthquake of 1906 (magnitude 7.8) was felt 350 miles away in the middle of Nevada, whereas the New Madrid earthquake of December 1811 (magnitude 8.0) rang church bells in Boston, Massachusetts, 1,000 miles away. Differences in geology east and west of the Rocky Mountains cause this strong contrast.

 

 

There is much more at the site above.

Well worth taking a look at.

It scares the be jeebers out of me.

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I've felt 2 minor earthquakes up here in northern Indiana in my lifetime, though more have occurred. So we certainly aren't immune to them.

 

I just want people to look at what they see in the news *today* and think about what THEY might do, and where they are and how it might affect them, should the "Big One" hit THEM.

 

 

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What have I learned? Well, it's reinforced much of what I already knew.

 

(1) The survival mentality and the will to live are the most important "things" a person can possess. Sometimes you must be willing to do the unthinkable to live and save the lives of those you love.

(2) Knowledge and skills are extremely important, more so than prep items. All the preps in your closet aren't any good if you don't know how to perform first aid, find or filter drinkable water using salvaged materials, build a fire without matches or a lighter, and other basic survival skills.

(3) Don't put all your eggs in one basket. Meaning, don't put all your preps in one place. Spread them out to increase the possibility of accessing at least one basic stash in the event of disaster

(4) Advanced first aid training is a very, very good idea. Read up on wilderness first aid and "ditch medicine". Take classes if you can.

 

One thing that I have learned is that many people don't think in advance of developing a plan to leave signs to indicate if someone is safe or if their child has been safely retrieved from school or daycare. I'm brainstorming on this one and trying to think of ways for my family to leave signs for each other that only we will understand. Maybe small cans of spray paint in each BOB to use on walls and a memorized list of symbols. Or an twist on the methods used in the wilderness of leaving signs maybe?

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The Chaos and breakdown of civilisation in the first week shown me a need to stay 'under the wire' for maybe the first 2 weeks. Have enough preps easily available to last the family 2 weks without having to put our heads above ground as it were. Also, this year our main project as part of 'forting up' is to rip the garden apart and put in raised beds (1 meter high). These will all have duplicate prep items sealed in soil pipe and burried in the beds.

 

The other thing to watch is how hordes of people are fleeing Port Au Prince to the countryside, with little or no supplies of their own. Thats something we all should keep in mind as we plan our familys security.

 

Ogre

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One thing that keeps resonating with me is that even if you have water and food stored, in an earthquake it most likely will be useless to you. If you are trapped and cannot move, it doesnt matter how much food is stored in an area that has collapsed and now off limits.

 

If you are lucky enough to survive the actual earthquake, chances are anything stored in your house will not be accessible. This means you should have storage somewhere outside of your house.. in a car, or a small shed... maybe at a friend or family members house.

 

 

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One thing that keeps resonating with me is that even if you have water and food stored, in an earthquake it most likely will be useless to you. If you are trapped and cannot move, it doesnt matter how much food is stored in an area that has collapsed and now off limits.

 

If you are lucky enough to survive the actual earthquake, chances are anything stored in your house will not be accessible. This means you should have storage somewhere outside of your house.. in a car, or a small shed... maybe at a friend or family members house.

 

This is my feeling also. But, not at a friend or family members house because ones close enough that I could access it without going very far would have the same problem. We do have a kind of open front barn that we use for storage and a basic earthquake package is going out there. It would include tools to try to access things in the house as well as things to keep us warm and fed.

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It might also be helpful to include, outside your home, a diagram of where everything is stored inside. If you aren't available, your family could benefit from knowing, for example, where the extra medical supplies should be, or where the cold-weather gear is.

 

If you store things outside in something airtight, like an old refrigerator, make sure you lock it. It could protect a curious child, as well as secure your stuff.

 

Just a thought.

 

 

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A small thing but my son has the habit (he's 8 yrs.old, homeschooled so home all the time) of wandering around the house with as little clothing on as posssible. Great for my laundry but also he is barefoot-- I talked with him a few days ago about wearing more clothing in case we had an earthquake so he is now keeping properly dressed and has socs and slippers on. It is winter here and it would be chilly to go out without much on. I've felt about 4 tremors here in the past 28 yrs and there was a small tremor felt in the Ottawa, Ontario/Quebec border just last week. I told him the earth is volataile right now and its very possible that we could experience something too. We live in the Niagara Fallls, Ont.area. I told him its important to also have shoes right at your bedside every night and know-remember where you put them in case you have to put them on in a hurry. I read on another site to keep a flashlight behind every door of your house for emergency purposes. As long as little kids or the dog doesn't run off with it, I think that is something that is worth doing.

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I live in north Mississippi, so needless to say "I'm in the AREA" of possible quakes. Two of the main things that "hit" me were my water supply and my food supply. Especially my food supply. I can ALOT.....but if a quake like that hits......well, bye-bye glass jars. I do dehydrate some, but am going to do alot more of that this year since I have a really good supply of canned items. I would think the dehydrated containers would be alot more apt to survive than canned or frozen. Like someone mentioned earlier......spread them out in different areas. I may even invest in some MRE's......just for variety. Also going to spread out some large pots and water purifying tablets in different areas in case I can't use my Big Berkey or get to my other supplies for purifying.

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The thing that is weighing heavy on my mind is shelter. I'm looking out the window at a blizzard right now. If our houses were taken out, we'd have some struggles. The tents are stored in the house. So, one question I'm pondering is how and where I could store temporary shelter. Animals get in to most everything here, so an old fridge probably wouldn't do it.

 

The other thing I'm thinking is that we need to do a unit homeschool unit on levers really soon. And also show the children where the jacks are stored and how to use them.

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I just saw scrolling across the bottom of the tv screen that the Haitian people will need lots of rice, beans, grains, and a source of purifying water when then settle down in order to live. Does this sound familiar? Is this a warning to the American people?

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*Clean water is essential.

 

*Keep on hand food that can be eaten without much preparation - even peanut butter and crackers are better than nothing.

 

*Medical supplies on site should be easily available.

 

*Aftershocks continue and will bring down already shaky structures.

 

*Looters will take advantage of ANY situation, as will robbers. (How many of those women and children so publicly given food and water "first" were robbed on their way back to their shelters?)

 

*Would your supplies survive? Do you need an outdoor-and-crushproof emergency shelter/cache? Even an old refrigerator in an outdoor shed could hold extra supplies.

 

*Don't count on governmental help in local, state, OR national... they must first "assess and coordinate the situation" while you're hurting immediately. And they will FIRST help their own.

 

*Assume communication is cut... will your family know where to look, who to contact, where to meet up? HAVE A PLAN.

 

 

Yes, yes and more Yesses. to all Your points.

I've been watching the news from Haiti.

 

The biggest thing i've "learned" is that:

 

It will be a greater, more horrific situation than Anything i can try to visualise.

 

Mental pictures when reading "One Second After" stay with me to this day. Seeing the news...reading first hand accounts from Haiti are double imprinting those pictures. When i read the news report about the nursing home residents with no-one to care for them...i cried !

 

Even so, what i hear on the news and read on-line cannot begin to show the actuality of it. Then...i look at my stash of food preps and other supplies...and think "not even a drop in the bucket !"

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To nmchick...what we did was store tents, equipment etc. in an old minivan that we have. Then its (hopefully) accessible and no animals can get into it. We are in the country though.

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Good idea Motherhen, but New Mexico mice seem to be able to get in any vehicle! I opened the trunk of my car one day and surprised one! Apparently, it rode in to town with me. Bet it had some good stories to tell. We have measures to fight this, like putting mint oil in the ventilation system, parking under a light ever night, and removing all cover from around the vehicles, but it's still a battle. (The mice say "ummm, yum, fire wal!".) But, I could consider metal boxes inside a vehicle. The vehicle would keep the bigger animals away from the boxes and the mice don't know how to chew through metal yet.

 

Do bears know how to open car doors? Might be easier to train the small children to unlock a vehicle. But training them not to lose a key could be tricky.

 

 

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Hmmm...well I don't know about mice. I think that if a bear wanted to get in, it could but we don't have bears here. For us, the van is unlocked...we rarely lock anything here except the house at night. If you needed to lock it, there should be a place where one is hidden and everyone knows where it is--maybe a few locations!----perhaps at your 'station' where everyone knows to meet up at in case of fire so you cann do a head count. For us, its our mailbox on the road which is about 30' away from where the minivan is parked. We also have our horse trailer parked there too--with dog crates/cages inside in case of evacuation.

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1. Access to drinkable water is essential. Assume your home supply will be inaccessible. (House collapsed) So have a filter stored somewhere you CAN get to it.

 

2. Food is NOT essential--useful, yes, but are you going to starve to death in a week? Not likely. If you have an extenuating medical condition requiring food--prep some chow like the water filter--ACCESSIBLE!

 

3. Learn as much first aid as you can before it happens. Stock sufficient supplies to deal with many injuries, including severe trauma. Stock topical antibiotics or other antiseptics--preferably in multiple locations.

 

4. Have a friends & family emergency contact system in place...be it ham radio, cell phones and WiFi (that probably won't work), CB radios etc. Pencil & paper for notes, spray paint to mark buildings etc.

 

5. Have some form of immediate shelter stored in a vehicle or somewhere accessible. Tarp, tent, camper etc.

 

6. Have one or more weapons to protect your family and your property. Know how to use them--whatever type of weapons they may be.

 

7. Don't forget to prep for your pets.

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1. No matter how many preps you have, you need to be able to get to them in a disaster. In an earthquake all your preps in the house may be impossible to get to right away. What I've learned? Keep more water and food in the van! Keep my survival straw filter in there as well. It's hard to store water in the winter because it freezes, but water is plentiful here in the winter, just need a way to purify it.

2. First aid and "ditch" medicine may be the only medical aid you have. - So this is on my list to review and print out to keep in the van a copy of Where there is no Doctor and Where there is no Dentist along with a better first aid kit.

3. I need a better earthquake plan that is revised for my new life = I may be in the city 15 miles away, and my husband also not home if an earthquake happens. The kids need to know what to do if we are both out of town or we can't get to them.

4. Communication is really important. And Haiti has shown us that it can stay in play in an emergency even this severe so keep those phones charged and get a small solar phone charger!

Edited by Becca_Anne

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Number 1 lesson?

 

Don't be a native of the most corrupt, backwards, cesspool of a third-world country on earth when the Big One hits.

 

Sorry, but it has to be said.

 

Due to the state of the so-called country of Haiti, the after effects of this quake are worse than we would experience from even an 8.0 happening along New Madrid.

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Number 1 lesson?

 

Don't be a native of the most corrupt, backwards, cesspool of a third-world country on earth when the Big One hits.

 

Sorry, but it has to be said.

 

Due to the state of the so-called country of Haiti, the after effects of this quake are worse than we would experience from even an 8.0 happening along New Madrid.

 

 

Sad - but I heartily agree!

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whitewolf55, my mother and grandmother taught me to put rubberbands, and/or the cut off tops of old socks around the body of canning jars to cushion against earthquakes.

A slat or bungee cord across the front of the shelves is good too, to help prevent sliding off the front.

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i've learned to keep my child WITH ME! and not give her a way to total strangers...not that that's what i'd do, but.... speaking of which...the day of the haiti earthquake at school they had a disaster preparedness workshop for the parents throughout the district. one of the things the red cross volunteer mentioned was, if you believe you will be separated from your child then mark them on their body with a marker!!! waterproof marker, too.

i did this the day before and the day i was giving birth. i marked both my arms with what my intentions were in case something happened to me during the c-section.

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i know of a friend who works at the hospital. she knows of three teams going week by week starting next week to haiti. if i could i would tell those doctors that they need to bring their own supplies. and i don't just mean medical items. they need to bring their own BOBs. they need to bring their own buckets and detergent to wash their clothes. they need to bring their own food and water. and bring food and water to hand out to their patients and families. be prepared to spend at least a dollar to pay people for helping them because of their work. in haiti the average person earns one dollar a day.

know that they aren't going to summer camp! since they work at a public general hospital with a lot of gang related gunshot wounds, etc... they have triage down. they know how ugly things can get. actually at this hospital it was reported years ago that the military sends their doctors there to train for field combat due to the gang related wounds, etc...

 

be prepared to bring your own generator!

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