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Eating From Your Food Stores


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A friend of mine sent me this blog address.

 

It's about a lovely lady, stay-at-home, homeschooling (elementary) mom of 10 who has accepted a challenge to eat from her food stores for 90 days. Now, being Mormon, she does have access to things that the 'average' person doesn't, but not a lot of her recipies are based on these things.

 

I know a few of you on Mrs S have done this - and if the Student Loan People keep being as ugly as sin, I may have to eat from food stores as well.

 

At any rate, this blog is fascinating. Do give it a read and I'd love to hear your comments.

 

 

http://3monthspreparation.blogspot.com/201...r-3-months.html

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Great, but........................................

The problem with all these great 'trails' is that they stock up first - like her buying diapers and stuff before starting?

And then you are using up all the food in the house so at the end you HAVE to go shopping to restock. So in the end did she save? I think not.

 

It would be better to design a plan to cut back on waist and also start cooking more then one meal at a time to save money on gas or whatever you cook with. Plan to eat out less and eat from you garden would save much more.

 

But hey, with 10 kids she is doing a great job.

 

:AmishMichael2:

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If she is doing it to see what she needs to do to get that family thru hard tiimes, then it is good. Daughter and I frequently go 3-4 months between grocery store visits. There is a big difference between 10 and 2 when you're stocking up though.

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I didn't like the fact that she "stacked the decks" so to speak by planning ahead and getting 3 months worth of grapefruit, formula, etc. If this had been a true crisis, she wouldn't have had that opprotunity.

 

I know if I started this today, I'd be dreadfully low on veggies - I'm almost out of home canned green beans and don't nearly have enough frozen veggies.

 

Nonetheless, it is interesting to see how she does it - with 10 kids, no less.

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We ate from our stores for 5 months last year, while paying to have our entire plumbing system replaced. We did buy milk, cheese and broccoli, though. (I could have made up the milk and cheese from dry milk stores, and used something else instead of fresh broccoli.)

 

I'll take a look at her blog and see what she did. Sounds like it might be interesting. Thanks for the link!

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Cat - I *KNOW* - I saw this and since this wasn't a 'real' crisis, there is NO reason at all why she couldn't have frozen few extra pounds of butter. A lot of people still don't know that canning dairy is potentially feeding your family botulism.

 

Like I said - I knew this would be interesting, thought provoking, and make people here think...it was definitely Mrs S 'usable' :)

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If I had ten kids, I'd be far too busy going completely and utterly insane, and wouldn't have time to think of living off my food storage. :cheeky-smiley-067:

 

I guess that an exercise like this might be a good one for rotating out aging stock...I agree, though, that for a "disaster preview" it's not totally accurate because of the pre-stocking -- however, if I had babies I don't think I'd want to deal with three months w/o diapers if I had a choice!! LOL

 

Bad bad lady for canning dairy...good good lady for having 90 days' supplies stocked for a dozen people!

 

 

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First off - she is Morman so they know how to prep.

But...............

If this was a test - she failed!

no short cuts aloud when you are really trying to see if it can be done.

HELLO:

powered milk - wouldn't kill them to drink for 90 days.

cloth diapers are what EVERYONE will be using when the time comes so she should have just done that.

stocking shelves is a no-no because if TSHTF you ain't got time to shop!

 

This is like when people tell us they are going "pioneer' for the weekend to see if they can survive if something happens.

Then they report about what they did:

But the kids HAD to watch that show and the next night the movie was good too - but THAT was all they watched so it was OK.

I planned to cook outside on the grill but it started to rain so I used the microwave and DH can't drink instant coffee so I just made one pot each day using Mr. Coffee.

And I just had to run the washing machine and seeing it rained the clothes went into the dryer. but ONLY 4 loads!

 

So you see other then that we didn't use electric all weekend long. And we just used the kitchen light most of the time - well other then when we were playing a game -then we needed more light to see so...........

 

and on and on -BUT they are so proud that they NOW KNOW they can make it if all power is off and no gas for cars and , and, and.

 

 

Sorry but NO YOU DIDN'T!!!!!!

 

I know it might be mean but it is like if you had to take a test in school but you don't like science. You can't ask the teacher if Michael and come in and help you take the test?

 

:AmishMichael2:

 

 

 

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LOL, Michael! I agree it wasn't a fair test, but if it gets people to thinking, then it is not all bad.

 

I used to think that the minute something happened and we lost the power, I'd get busy canning all the meat out of the freezer. Then I got to thinking about it and decided to go ahead and do it before it came down to do or die.

 

Which reminds me, now most of the renovating is done, I have a pig in the freezer to can so I can butcher the one in the pen. First I need a new aviary finished and a pen for the runner ducks. Those can't wait. Always something.

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The second she went out and stocked up before the test, she failed in my mind. The test was to see if she could eat only on what she had, not eat on what she had plus bought before hand. Also she ran out of formula because she's not breastfeeding enough, I don't know why shes using formula and not exclusive breast milk, but she would be in huge trouble if she ran out of formula in an emergency. In my eyes she failed the test before she started.

 

Also I'm on the fence on the milk with botulism thing because botulism is a soil born illness and if you pressure can milk there should not be an issue. Although she was canning velveeta from what I can tell, besides being gross,s that sounds like it can be very dangerous too.

Edited by FunkyPioneer
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Yep, Violet DID find out !! No, I am not happy, LOL. I will look and see if I can email her and tell her, in a nice way, of course.

If you die of botulism or a family member does, I guess I really would not consider that surviving too well !!

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If you post to her blog, you educate everyone reading, too. :bouquet:

 

 

 

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Violet, is it true that "canned" dairy can't give you botulism since it's found in the dirt? I'm so confused. Is the dairy just potentially yucky and will make you sick? Or can it have botulism?

 

Either way, I'm glad that you posted to her blog. That's why you earn the big bucks now...because you KNOW what you're talking about! ;) Way to go on passing along the knowledge that you've gained. I'm sure that if nothing else, she'll be glad to have the input.

 

FunkyPioneer, as far as the formula goes -- I don't know why she chose to bottle-feed, but I know that in my case, it was the only option I had. With both my babies, I didn't get any milk in. I tried and tried and tried -- DS lost a scary amount of weight before I finally switched him over at his doctor's insistence (when DD came along, I knew what was happening and once I realized I wasn't getting millk in, I switched her over much sooner). I was SO mad, because let me tell you -- when you've been hauling a pair of double D's around since you were twelve, you figure you should be able to nurse an entire small nation or something, and when your boobies let you down it ain't a good thing!!! *grrr* She could have had a similar experience -- either way, I think that if one is bottle-feeding, formula is an absolutely ESSENTIAL aspect of food storage. Even if one is exclusively nursing their baby, I would still stock some formula -- there is no guarantee that in a disaster or epidemic situation, Mom will survive. Sad and scary, but something we mommies need to consider.

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You can get botulism from home canned dairy. It isn't just the dirt. It is also in low acid foods. It grows in the absence of air, such as a sealed jar. The butter is not even "canned". Just heated and has the lid put on and sealed from the heat. No processing at all.

We don't have any safe way to can dairy at home, but the commercial industry does.

This information will help you understand botulism. Sure, it is rare, but if you can something improperly, the risk is still there. About a year ago we had some cases of botulism from improperly canned green beans. You will see that is it all low acid foods, not just dairy.

 

http://missourifamilies.org/features/foods...es/fdsfty60.htm

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You can get botulism from home canned dairy. It isn't just the dirt. It is also in low acid foods. It grows in the absence of air, such as a sealed jar. The butter is not even "canned". Just heated and has the lid put on and sealed from the heat. No processing at all.

We don't have any safe way to can dairy at home, but the commercial industry does.

This information will help you understand botulism. Sure, it is rare, but if you can something improperly, the risk is still there. About a year ago we had some cases of botulism from improperly canned green beans. You will see that is it all low acid foods, not just dairy.

 

http://missourifamilies.org/features/foods...es/fdsfty60.htm

 

There was a case of botulism in Utah (state next door) a couple of years ago from home-canned green beans -- the lady had water-bath canned them instead of pressure canning. I believe that mom and two kids got sick -- mom wound up on a respirator and almost died. I believe that all three survived, thank God. But they only lived because of heavy medical intervention, which wouldn't be available in a SHTF situation.

 

Violet, as long as you pressure can all of your low-acid foods and meats (properly), are you assured of not getting botulism?

 

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You can get botulism from home canned dairy. It isn't just the dirt. It is also in low acid foods. It grows in the absence of air, such as a sealed jar. The butter is not even "canned". Just heated and has the lid put on and sealed from the heat. No processing at all.

We don't have any safe way to can dairy at home, but the commercial industry does.

This information will help you understand botulism. Sure, it is rare, but if you can something improperly, the risk is still there. About a year ago we had some cases of botulism from improperly canned green beans. You will see that is it all low acid foods, not just dairy.

 

http://missourifamilies.org/features/foods...es/fdsfty60.htm

Violet, Botulism is a soil born illness.

Clostridium botulinum is a ubiquitous soil-dwelling bacteria and is found in soils throughout the US. Many infant botulism patients have been demonstrated to live near a construction site or an area of soil disturbance.
Which means that something has to come in contact with the spores from the soil to have the botulism spore contained in it. Of course it is still possible that the cow could get the spore on their udder, and it not be cleaned off during the cleaning and milking process, and still survive the pasteurization process, but that is slim. Otherwise you would see people getting botulism from milk from the grocery store which is only heated to 160 degrees.
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I don't advise taking chances with improper canning, but if people would take a hefty dose of activated charcoal at the first sign of food poisoning, they stand a much better chance of surviving it.

 

Botulism is rather slow onset and the symptoms are a result of the neurotoxins from the bacteria. Activated charcoal adsorbs these toxins and decreases or prevents the symptoms.

 

http://www.mayoclinic.com/health/botulism/...ECTION=symptoms

Symptoms

By Mayo Clinic staff

 

Signs and symptoms of food-borne botulism typically begin between 12 and 36 hours after the toxin gets into your body. If infant botulism is related to food, such as honey, problems will generally begin within this time frame, too. However, the symptoms of wound botulism typically start about 10 days after you're infected by the bacteria.

 

Food-borne and wound botulism

Signs and symptoms of food-borne and wound botulism include:

 

* Difficulty swallowing or speaking

* Facial weakness on both sides of the face

* Blurred vision

* Drooping eyelids

* Trouble breathing

* Nausea, vomiting and abdominal cramps (only in food-borne botulism)

* Paralysis

 

Infant botulism

 

* Constipation (often the first sign)

* Floppy movements due to muscle weakness, and trouble controlling the head

* Weak cry

* Irritability

* Drooling

* Drooping eyelids

* Tiredness

* Difficulty sucking or feeding

* Paralysis

 

Certain signs and symptoms usually aren't present with botulism, including no elevation in blood pressure or heart rate, no confusion and no fever. However, fever is sometimes present with wound botulism.

 

When to see a doctor

Seek urgent medical care if you suspect that you have botulism. Early treatment increases your chances of survival. Seeking medical care promptly may also serve to alert public health authorities, who can keep other people from eating contaminated food.

 

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writing.gif Note to self: add "activated charcoal" to preps...

 

 

;)

 

 

 

 

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