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Tree tapping


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CGA, Mt_Rider and I were talking about tapping trees in another thread. I decided to make a separate thread to make info easier to find in the future.

 

http://www.greendecade.org/news/news_urbansugaring.html - This one is a how to that tells how to make a spile out of a 3/4" dowel rod and how to use it.

 

http://maple.dnr.cornell.edu/ - Cornell University's website on all things sugar maple and maple syrup

 

http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_do_you_make_maple_tree_spiles - used 1/4" irrigation tubing and paraffin

 

http://www.insideinly.org/2011/upper-elementary-makes-science-stick-with-maple-syrup/ - Montessori kids learning about maple syrup

 

http://www.maplehillfarms.biz/microspiles.html - low impact harvesting with a mirco spile. looks more like for a big production, but interesting info on how long it takes the hole in the trees to heal.

 

http://tapmytrees.com/ - lots of info and have supplies to order

 

http://www.wikihow.com/Tap-a-Pine-Tree - tapping pine trees for solvents - naturally contains turpentine

 

I'm still looking for a good list of trees that are suitable for tapping. In the other thread we sycamore, poplar, aspen, birch, and cottonwood.

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Red Maple trees are the ones to 'tap' for good maple syrup!

There are other ones that will give you something to use in a pinch?

So are you saying that I should put 2 of my taps into my BOB when done tapping the trees here in the Spring?

Now THAT will get people thinking when I show them my bag. :sHa_sarcasticlol:

The world is :smiley_shitfan: BUT Michael has time to make Maple Syrup! :faint3:

:AmishMichaelstraw:

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Let'em laugh. :sHa_sarcasticlol: Then, if it comes to it, you can laugh the whole time you're tapping a tree for water. :girlneener:

 

 

 

I'd never really hear of tapping a tree for water until the 2nd Hunger Games book. One of the characters tied a spile to her belt so they could tap the trees for water, because it was the only fresh water available. I learned the word spile from the book too. Who says you can't learn from modern popular fiction. ;)

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Let'em laugh. :sHa_sarcasticlol: Then, if it comes to it, you can laugh the whole time you're tapping a tree for water. :girlneener:

 

 

 

I'd never really hear of tapping a tree for water until the 2nd Hunger Games book. One of the characters tied a spile to her belt so they could tap the trees for water, because it was the only fresh water available. I learned the word spile from the book too. Who says you can't learn from modern popular fiction. ;)

 

not all trees wil give you water - there is only one kind that I know of that does that and maybe cactus ? But it doesn't grow anywhere around the US?

Also the only time you can get a goof 'flow' is in the early spring so lets all plan to have it happen then , while we are vacation at the place that has the water trees! Oh, and has a guy who takes silver coins and gives you food would be a big help as well. :sHa_sarcasticlol:

:AmishMichaelstraw:

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There are actually several trees that you may get water from. This is the best list of trees for emergecy water that I have found so far. It's from

http://www.farm-drea...-3-water-fire-1

 

 

"Tapping trees is another emergency source of water. We normally think of maple trees when we hear the term "tapping trees," but sugar maples are scarce in my neck of the woods. Down here we have red maple, striped maple, silver maple, sycamore and box elder (ash-leaved maple). Precious liquid (sap) can be obtained from any of these, but sugar maple is clearly the best. Don't expect to hang a bucket on these other trees. More than likely, you'll be licking the sap as it oozes out. In the late Winter / early Spring experiments I've done, I simply used to knife to drill a 1 – 1 ½ inch deep hole into the tree to acquire the sap. I've read that the South facing side of trees, on sunny days are better, but honestly I'm no expert on tapping trees. I'm sure there are folks on here that know quite a bit and I invite them to contribute to the discussion. As mentioned last week…birch and hickory can provide some fluids too."

He mentioned he experimented in late winter early spring. I've read on some sites where this is the best time for obtaining sap for syrup as it flows most freely. Most of the info I've found so far doesn't mention a time of year that you can or can't get water. I'm still looking for info as I haven't found a comprehensive list of trees - if one even exsists.

 

CGA and Mt_Rider also mentioned poplar, aspen, and cottonwood as possible sources of water.

 

I wouldn't expect trees could be used as a sole source of water, but I could see where the knowledge of which trees give at least some drinkable water and how to obtain it with and without a spline could be of use, especially in a travelling on foot situation.

Edited by windmorn
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http://www.wildwoodsurvival.com/survival/water/men72/index.html

 

This article is very long and has several other emergency sources. This is the part on trees.

 

"Hardwoods: In early spring, walnut, maple, birch, and hickory trees can all serve as sources of water. To get the fluid, you simply tap the tree -- as Vermont maple-syrup makers do -- by boring a half-inch or quarter-inch hole into the trunk with a knife or sharp rock, inserting a hollow reed, and collecting the thin sap in a bark or log cup.

 

 

 

Alternatively, you can cut through the bark with diagonal slashes. Make sure that you cut into the sap wood, or cambium, that lies just under the bark and that you don't kill the tree by cutting all the way around it.

 

 

 

Since water gathered by this method contains a high concentration of sugar, drinking large amounts of it can cause an upset stomach or cramps. For the same reason, the liquid tends to spoil when it's not drunk soon. (I like to use it to brew a pre-sweetened herbal tea!)

 

 

 

Sycamore trees can be tapped in the same manner as can the hardwoods mentioned above. The water from this tree, however, can be harvested any time of year except the dead of winter and, since it doesn't contain much sugar, can be consumed in quantity or stored for a few days."

 

 

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OK, not to harp on this BUT are we talking 'water' from trees or 'sap'?

:shrug:

there is a big differance between the two.

IF you want water (and your body NEEDS water not sap) then 'tapping a tree' isn’t going to give you what you need?

and

Most trees have the most 'sap' running in the spring ( for about 2 weeks), you will have to sit and wait for a few hours (or more) to get enough to drink in other seasons, and IF you are 'on the move' this will not work very well?

Yes, good ideas but remember that you cannot go for days without water (not pop or syrupy drinks but just plain old water!) because you will dehydrate and if you are not used to walking or it is sunny out it will get you even faster than you think.

:AmishMichaelstraw:

 

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I tried to post articles on both tapping to make syrup and to get water. If it's a long term no electricity, stay in place kind of thing and there's no stores and you have the right kind and enough to tap for syrup, it would make for a really special meal if you can spare the energy/fire/gas/wood to boil it long enough. Just reading about it has made me want to go look behind our house for enough trees to try making syrup, especially the ones other than maple. I agree nothing beats a good water source, but I'm thinking of what if you can't seem to find one.:shrug: Seems like a good idea to know where you can get some.

 

 

From what I've been reading, I thought water from trees was the sap. While googling to see what the difference is I found this article http://voices.yahoo.com/guide-native-plants-midwest-5784926.html?cat=32 . It says the pioneers looked for sycamores, because if they weren't near water the sap could be used as water.

 

I also found one on water from banana trees/plants http://www.ehow.com/how_4424161_get-drinking-water-from-banana.html - for our deep south friends that are able to grow banana plants outside.

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