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Mt_Rider

Whole lotta data about Cast Iron

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The roast was amazing! I've never had a roast brown that wasn't burnt or all dried out. I was really pleased! Hubby said he really likes "carmalized" potatoes! :grinning-smiley-044: They were really good. I even made biscuits in my skillet in the oven. Yup, now I want a griddle. I was going to make beef and noodles in the dutch oven, with the leftovers, for supper, but no one was really hungry, so we just had ice cream.

 

Hubby spent the evening looking at cast iron cookware online. He decided he was going to see if he could get the pieces at the auction, sell the ones I don't want, and use the money to buy a griddle. I asked if he was excited about the prospect of another antique, or if he just really liked the dinner! :feedme: His answer, "BOTH!"

 

I've been wiping my pieces with veg. oil before I put them away. Didn't notice anything sticky. I wipe it really good with a rag afterward. Maybe that helps, or maybe I will get a sticky film after a while.

 

 

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Interestingly, there was an article in the new issue of Countryside about seasoning cast iron. Must be a topic on everyone's mind lately!

 

I had inherited my mothers old cast iron skillets when she passed, but I've lost them in various moves. :sad-smiley-012: I'm going to start haunting garage sales and Goodwill to get some pieces; if necessary I'll buy them new.

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I pulled out Dad's Griswold skillet from when he was in college. I'd torn most of the seasoning off after someone tried to put it in the dishwasher (it wasn't me!), and hadn't reseasoned it yet.

 

Used flax oil on it & seasoned it again. I'm the only one in the house who will cook with it, but yay, it's alive! Other people in the house are using nonstick, which I'm about to chunk because somebody used metal in it and scratched the crap out of the bottom.

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Non-stick....ick ick ick! Sure, eggs slither off when it's new. But they get old fast....even without using metal.

 

MtRider :grinning-smiley-044:

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Well, for a simple start, try this.

 

Do you know how to make popcorn on the stove top? Do you have a tight-fitting lid for the pan?

 

In case someone here has only done microwave popcorn...not in a pan...I'll give the details. :) Be careful of handling the HEAVY pans with hot oil! :grouphug:

 

 

 

Pour [not wipe] in enough veg oil to have a good coat on the bottom. Not depth for deep frying tho. Put in 3 kernals of popcorn, cover, and wait. Shake the pan [hang onto the lid and pan handle] back and forth on the stovetop. [tell me you don't have a glass top.. :( ] When you hear all 3 pop..or at least two if you have a dud, you know the oil is hot enough. Put in a tablespoon more of the kernals. From this, you'll be able to tell how much more your pan will hold when popped....but since this is about seasoning instead of snacks, a tablespoon will do.

 

Replace lid and continue shaking the pan/lid back and forth with frequent, jerky shakes. You have to move the kernals. Pretty soon it will sound like a machine gun inside the pan. {Must I say it for someone? DON'T OPEN THE LID! :P } Shake continually then. For a cast iron pan, shut the stove heat off well before the popping dies down. Cast iron holds heat and will get hotter even when you turn the burner off. That has to be anticipated whenever you're cooking with cast iron. ;) Hey, uses less heat energy.

 

As soon as no more has popped, carefully open the lid and pour into a bowl [one that can tolerate very hot kernals]...and watch out for that hot oil. And one more pop...just to startle you. :lol:

 

Return the well oiled pan to the stovetop and let it set there while the burner cools down. When the pan and any leftover oil is cool, pour oil off and wipe out the inside of the pan completely dry with a paper towel. [You can keep that paper towel to touch up the re-seasoning after each washing, btw]

 

OK...now feel the bottom of the pan. Is it getting glassy and black? If the paper towel was sticking to the roughness of the pan, it might take more than this. I can't say for sure...not being able to see the condition of the pan.

 

 

[is the pan grey or black, btw???]

 

Don't try cooking eggs in it till you've got it very well seasoned...which might take some more cooking in it.

 

Stir fry is good. Anything you can cook where the food is already pretty slippery. Just to keep using it and getting more layers on it. Time, rather than technique, is sometimes the answer. :shrug:

 

 

I TOASTED my fry pan recently by forgetting to turn off the burner when I only meant to dry it thoroughly. :cheeky-smiley-067: Obliterated the black and glossy surface. :sad-smiley-012: I do that WAY too frequently. But since my grsons were here watching a video....I made popcorn. Deep fat frying in such a pan is also an excellent way to get a start on that glass surface. But it's more commitment in time. Popcorn is easy!

 

 

MtRider [ :cheer: We're cheering for you! ]

 

 

:happy0203:

 

I finally found a lid that fits the pan (with a little aluminum foil creativity to fill the gap) and made the popcorn. Wiped the pan afterward, and not sticky one bit. It does look darker, but still not glassy, but I am determined to keep at it until it is :)

 

This technique is definitely much more successful than my previous attempts

 

Thanks again :bouquet:

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:cele::band2::thumbs:

 

 

I was hoping it would work for you. It does take time to get glassy. And if you roast the pan while attempting to merely dry it :whistling: , you get to start over again!

 

 

MtRider :thumbs:

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I'm putting the crappy cast iron (from Harbor Freight) we received for our wedding (y'know, a year ago) in the oven on the self-cleaning cycle to see if it is salvageable.

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It's likely the very rough, porus stuff. Do you have a decent sanding tool? Smooth it out like Gunplumber described above. Otherwise it will never be the truely lovely cast iron that we're all talking about.

 

 

MtRider :wub:

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Non-stick....ick ick ick! Sure, eggs slither off when it's new. But they get old fast....even without using metal.

 

MtRider :grinning-smiley-044:

 

Only way I get along with non-stick is to cook "very low" and "very slow"...once it breaks it's bead, it's gone! Trash!!! I won't use a non-stick with even a tiny scratch in it!

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Would seasoning with butter work out okay?

Butter has a smoking point of 250-300 degrees; canola oil has a smoking point of 400 degrees. I guess you could season with butter as long as you do it outside!

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It's likely the very rough, porus stuff. Do you have a decent sanding tool? Smooth it out like Gunplumber described above. Otherwise it will never be the truely lovely cast iron that we're all talking about.

 

 

MtRider wub.gif

 

 

"Drummel, drummel, drummel...LOL"

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I suspect that if I actually paid myself in labor and material it would have been more cost effective to buy a higher priced "finished" cast iron than to improve the finish of what I had.

 

Food sticks more aggressively to a coarse surface than a smooth. You work long and hard polishing a pan so you spend less time cleaning it over the next 50 years.

 

An angle tool - air or electric, so the sanding disc is parallel to the surface.

 

be careful around the pan walls - I gut a few nicks in the wall from the edge of the sanding disc.

 

I started with 60#, then 100#, then coarse (red?) scotchbrite, then fine (blue?).

Edited by Gunplumber

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"Drummel, drummel, drummel...LOL"

 

 

:scratchhead:

 

 

.........."Dremel"?

 

MtRider :unsure:

 

Yeah, drE...LOL

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(I mentioned this in another thread, but also wanted to add it here to keep all the cast iron info in one place.)

 

I contacted Lodge to find out if their preseasoning is Gluten Free. It is! I had plans to remove it and reseason, but since cast iron is porous, I wouldn't be comfortable using a cast iron pan that once has gluten on it, even if we did sand/burn/whatever it. I know there's sometimes a debate about that, but I don't want to take chances with my health.

 

To remove Lodge's preseasoning (which seems to be soy), they recommend:

Preheating your oven for 400 degrees and baking for 2 hours, then clean and reseason per their website. So I'm doing that. I think DH is going to have to sand some before we reseason, though.

 

http://www.lodgemfg.com/useandcare/seasoned-cast-iron

 

Refurbish Your Finish

While maintaining the seasoning should keep your Cast Iron and Carbon Steel in good condition, at some point you may need to re-season your cookware. If food sticks to the surface, or you notice a dull, gray color, repeat the seasoning process:

* Wash the cookware with hot, soapy water and a stiff brush. (It is okay to use soap this time because you are preparing to re-season the cookware).

* Rinse and dry completely.

* Apply a very thin, even coating of MELTED solid vegetable shortening (or cooking oil of your choice) to the cookware inside and out. Too much oil will result in a sticky finish.

* Place aluminum foil on the bottom rack of the oven to catch any drips.

* Set oven temperature to 350 – 400 degrees F.

* Place cookware upside down on the top rack of the oven to prevent pooling.

* Bake the cookware for at least one hour. After the hour, turn the oven off and let the cookware cool in the oven.

* Store the cookware uncovered, in a dry place when cooled.

* Repeat as necessary.

 

 

 

EDITED TO ADD: The baking for 2 hours seems to have done nothing to remove their preseasoning.

Edited by out_of_the_ordinary

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DH picked up a sanding wheel for his drill. He got 3 pans to have fairly smooth cooking surfaces. :wub:

He also realized he should be wearing a dust mask part way through the 2nd pan. :shakinghead:

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I am very fortunate to have found a man who has an almost full set of cast iron cookware. AND he uses it! Also, he can cook, survival and being outdoors in important to him. Can you say husband material? ;):cloud9:

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Bumping this up.

 

I thought I had a brilliant idea to get my cast iron off of the stovetop (some stored there) and in the oven (when not in use) for storage. I'd put it in that broiler drawer we never use. Bad, bad, bad idea. :groooansmileyf: One time of baking something in the oven ruined the seasoning on the pans stored in the broiler drawer. :sad-smiley-012: Me, not realizing this, had DH cook burgers in one for supper the next night. :yuk: DD is a year old now and teething (tooth #8). I'm an exhausted mama whose mind goes blank now when I try to remember about re-seaoning cast iron (yet I kept thinking of MrsS and MtRider!).

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Yep, MtRider LOVES cast iron cookware. :wub:

 

 

:frying pan: ......cast iron has SO many uses. :happy0203:

 

Know what I thot of this morning? Our 'outside' socks really need some hand scrubbing. I can't find my handwashing scrub board anywhere [it's here somewhere!]. So I sat and thought of what else I had with a wavy-type surface????? :scratchhead: Ah HA! I have a cast iron rectangular griddle. One surface is smooth and the opposite side has a steak-searing wavy surface. I'm just betting it would work for scrubbing sox. I'd hafta keep my knuckles off of it tho.

 

I realllly DO like multipurpose items.

 

 

So did these threads answer your questions, OOTO? :)

Edited by Mt_Rider
X3 to get smilie right

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Yep, MtRider LOVES cast iron cookware. :wub:

 

 

:frying pan: ......cast iron has SO many uses. :happy0203:

 

Know what I thot of this morning? Our 'outside' socks really need some hand scrubbing. I can't find my handwashing scrub board anywhere [it's here somewhere!]. So I sat and thought of what else I had with a wavy-type surface????? :scratchhead: Ah HA! I have a cast iron rectangular griddle. One surface is smooth and the opposite side has a steak-searing wavy surface. I'm just betting it would work for scrubbing sox. I'd hafta keep my knuckles off of it tho.

 

I realllly DO like multipurpose items.

 

 

So did these threads answer your questions, OOTO? :)

Yes, thank you!

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Roasting green coffee beans in your pan will season it nicely after a few rounds. Do it outside

 

 

I am trying to find a reasonably priced xtra large comal to use on the outdoor wood stove attached to the bread oven which I am in process of building, slowly.

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