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egg price spike coming??


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Looks like Mexico has been hit pretty hard with bird flu killing their chickens. So they are buying US eggs to supplement their egg sales until they can clean up and get more hens producing.

 

Mexico scrambles to cope with egg shortage

By MICHAEL WEISSENSTEIN | Associated Press – 12 hrs ago

 

MEXICO CITY (AP) — The Mexican government is battling an egg shortage and hoarding that have caused prices to spike in a country with the highest per-capita egg consumption on Earth.

 

A summer epidemic of bird flu in the heart of Mexico's egg industry has doubled the cost of a kilo (2.2 pounds), or about 13 eggs, to more than 40 pesos ($3), a major blow to working- and middle-class consumers in a country that consumes more than 350 eggs per person each year. That's 100 more eggs per person than in the United States.

 

Egg prices have dominated the headlines here for a week, spurring Mexico City's mayor to ship tons of cheap eggs to poor neighborhoods and the federal government to announce emergency programs to get fresh chickens to farms hit by bird flu and to restock supermarket shelves with eggs imported from the U.S. and Central America.

 

The national dismay over egg prices has revealed the unappreciated importance of a cheap, easy source of protein that's nearly as important to Mexican kitchens as tortillas, rice and beans. Added boiled to stewed chicken, raw to a fruit-juice hangover cure and in every other conceivable form to hundreds of other foods, the once-ubiquitous egg has disappeared from many street-side food stands and middle-class kitchens in recent days.

 

"Eggs, as you know, are one of Mexicans' most important foods and make up a core part of their diet, especially in the poorest regions of the country," President Felipe Calderon said Friday as he announced about $227 million in emergency financing and commercial measures to restore production and replace about 11 million chickens slaughtered after the June outbreak of bird flu.

 

Calderon said he was sending inspectors to stop speculation that he blamed for high egg prices, which have almost single-handedly driven up the national rate of inflation.

 

He said that the government had already begun large-scale importation of eggs and that about 3 million hens were being sent to farms hit by the flu outbreak.

 

The Mexico City government has sent a refrigerated trailer-truck of eggs into working-class neighborhoods over the last three days, selling kilo packets for less than half the current market price. Several thousand people lined up for about two hours Friday morning to buy eggs from the truck in southeastern Mexico City's Iztacalco neighborhood.

 

Isidro Vasquez Gonzalez, an unemployed 43-year-old cook, waited with his niece and nephew to buy three kilos of eggs that they said they would eat almost immediately in a lunch of meatballs with chopped eggs.

 

"You can make eggs with anything — scrambled eggs, with pork rinds, eggs with beans, green chiles, poached eggs, green beans with eggs, eggs with tomato sauce, " Vazquez said, with a wistful look in his eyes. "People here eat a lot of eggs. They were the cheapest, but now they're the most expensive. They're more expensive than meat."

 

The crisis began with the June detection of bird flu in the western state of Michoacan, which produces roughly half of Mexico's eggs. Some 11 million birds were killed to prevent the spread of the disease, sharply cutting into the national supply of more than 2 million tons of eggs a year.

 

Government officials blame speculators in the wholesale egg business for driving up prices beyond the hike resulting from bird flu.

 

After existing stocks of eggs ran out, prices rose sharply in August.

 

"Eggs are what we eat the most these days," said Gertrudis Rodriguez, 68. But with the higher prices, she said, "if we eat beans, we don't eat eggs, or if we eat eggs, we don't eat beans with them."

 

Mexico City's public Food Supply Center, which provides government-subsidized fresh food to low-income residents, dropped other ingredients from its truck this week in favor of eggs, and will distribute 18 tons by the time its current stocks run out Monday, director-general Raymundo Collins said.

 

Calderon said more than 150 tons of eggs had already crossed the border from the U.S. and 100 trailers carrying 500 more tons would arrive in the country over the weekend.

 

"The federal government will keep using every tool in its power to keep family's quality of life from being eroded by unfair increases in the price of eggs," the president said.

 

http://news.yahoo.com/mexico-scrambles-cope-egg-shortage-223936510--finance.html

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wow atleast their mayor and people care and are shipping eggs to neighborhoods at half price when meat has gone up ive never seen half price meat trucks in my neighborhood and i dont figure we will see it in the future good to know people care and are looking out for us lol

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Well, in some countries they give advantages to the poor to keep them from rising up and throwing their rears to the street.

 

Hmmmm... scratchhead.gif

 

 

Maybe *every* country??? :shrug:

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Well, Momo, if you put the word out that you're looking, you might get some layers for free or for *cheep* ( :sHa_sarcasticlol: ) . People can't afford to feed more than they need. :shrug:

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Uh oh... lots of people's breakfasts are going to get disrupted. Many down there don't bother refrigerating the eggs- they go through them fast enough. When I did study abroad students down there would just stick the carton on the bookshelf. That gave me a bit of a shock, given American-style rules for food safety.

 

But I have fond memories of dormitory breakfasts of scrambled eggs, refried beans, and a bit of crema agria and salsa :feedme: Good eggs, too! Flavorful unlike the ones you get in the grocery stores here. I think the Mexicans are going to be ticked to get ours.

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My co-worker just returned from Mexico and she said eggs are now over $4.00 a kilo. They are getting eggs from Canada too. She said no one is eating chicken and to buy imported chicken is extremely expensive.

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Unfortunately, I'm afraid to calculate what my duck eggs cost...what with the cost of the day-old ducklings, baby feed, bedding - LOTS of bedding!, feed throughout their life at these prices.... :0327: Plus I'm taking care of them, watering them, getting their silly little selves off the pond every night so my investment doesn't get eaten. :banghead: Don't even think of all the cleaning up after the baby ducks - yuk! Labor-intensive till they can be free range on pond for the summer.

 

We're down to two egg layers [occasionally a third egg from an older duck] until the four young ones begin. We're hoping for them to start laying before the winter gets really cold/dark and they all quit for a couple months. But in spring, we'll have around 6 a day.

 

Is it worth it? For freshness [knowing what feed goes into the birds], and constant egg supply without a store? Yes. But for cost? I don't know. Depends on how high the store cost goes up....and how high the feed price goes up.

 

 

MtRider :shrug:

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  • 4 weeks later...

This is no surprise here...if corn seed goes sky high (which I believe it will because we're burning all of it in fuel, plus adding the drought) this spring...guess what? Chickens eat corn! That's one reason we had to hunt for corn seed at the end of August...none of the stores had it! Paid nearly $5 a scoop...but bought some any way.

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