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Repackage large containers or buy smaller?


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Ok, I haven't had any luck finding an answer to my question, so I'll just ask.

 

I've been thinking about getting some dehydrated and/or freeze-dried items to store, more to keep handy than for everyday use. Things like powdered milk, eggs, celery, etc. The best deal appears to be purchasing in the large #10 cans. Problem is, I'm single. And I would hate to open a #10 can of powdered eggs for an emergency and then have to toss the can months later because I couldn't use it up.

 

I've recently discovered that I can get these items in #2.5 cans, but they're not carried everywhere. Would I be better off (and is it even possible?) to buy the large cans and repackage (with what?) into smaller portions? That way I have less to use up and the majority of the purchase would still be good if I did have to get rid of some that spoiled. Or should I stick with the smaller cans since they can probably package better than I can at home? If so, does anyone know the best place to purchase stuff in the #2.5 cans?

 

And of course, if posted in the wrong area, feel free to move!

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A lot of people, including me a long time ago, believe buying in bulk is a money saver. It can be, if you use it in bulk, but for the rest of us it can be an expensive waste of money. You cannot "re-can" into smaller containers. Once a container is opened it must be considered fresh and be consumed as such. Stick with buying smaller containers.

 

I once got a good deal on a #10 can of Bamboo Shoots. 7 years later I still have it and frustrated now on if I will ever be able to use it for something. On the other hand, I acquired some #10 cans of Diced Tomatoes and those I use for making/canning salsa from the mixes sold by Ball® and Mrs. Wages®

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You can repackage many dry items in the seal-a-meal bags. Just do it immediately after opening the can. Put what you will use pretty quickly into a small glass jar. You can also repackage into canning jars with the appropriate attachment for the vacuum sealer.

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I store food mainly for the purpose of job layoffs and getting snowed in during the winter and I have just recently started buying #10 cans if I have to open them during the winter when I'm done with it temporarily I plan to vacuum seal into bags or glass jars.

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Research "dry canning" and look at Chef Tess. She's got a book out, based on a method in which you open the big cans, use them as ingredients for a mix, and re-seal the ingredients in quart canning jars with an oxygen absorber.

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First look at the price difference. If you will spend as much repackaging (seal-a-meal bags, etc)as you would buying the smaller container, why not just buy the smaller container. All other things being equal, for instance your time.

 

As for me, I would repackage. Right now, I have refrigerator and freezer and so an opened can of dry item (say, powdered buttermilk) would have the lid put on and put into the refrigerator.

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My plan is a mixture of both plans. It is just my son and I, so I am careful about buying bulk packages.

 

Every time there is a Walton order, I get a few of the small cans. Mostly dairy products like FD cheeses and such. Things that I consider luxury items, and would only open as a treat (we are MAJOR cheese lovers, and velveeta would NOT satisfy).

 

The stuff like egg powder, etc, I just plan to seal into smaller containers when I open it. In a long-term, no-power scenario, I assume that the stuff would be used up anyway.

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I repackage dry things using canning jars and oxygen absorbers. Seems to work great for me.

Hey if Violet says it is OK..................................

then go ahead and do it!

I would just make sure you put in oxygen absorbers like she (and others) have said. :thumbs:

 

 

Well, when I saw Violet said to do it that way, I knew it was ok!! LOL

 

Thanks, y'all. I was thinking that doing either the seal-a-meal/vacuum or canning jar/oxygen absorber should work (and was leaning toward the jar/oxygen option, but I just couldn't find anything about it. I'll probably try to stick with the smaller containers where possible, but if not, it's good to know I won't have to lose a big container of expensive supplies just because I need a little bit.

 

I'm just starting into what I consider long term storage-everything up to now has been regular store-bought food-and there's so much to learn!

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