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kappydell

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Well, today our new pup, Dodger had his first obedience training session. Just 10 min, he is only about 4 months old, and it was bewildering to him, but he took it well. Lots of praise and kisses. I trained dogs as a child thru 4-H, one dog made it up to reserve champion, so I think I will use the same training techniques with this one. I talked with my room-mate and we both agreed that along with basic obedience (sit, come, heel, stay, down, drop on recall, and carry) we might try to teach the little fellow to track as well, and I'd like to teach him the hand signals, and to bark (and be quiet) on command. However, we will start small.

 

Lesson #1 - Heel, Sit and Come.

I use a choker collar, so he cannot slip out of it; but it is worn only for training so I don't teel it will be dangerous. I know some folks don't like chokers, but I consider it more humane than other techniques I have learned about using shock collars.

 

So put on the choker collar (the right way, so it releases immediately with you loosen the leash).

Now we walk, "Dodger, Heel" and pat the left leg. Walk slowly a short distance. You might have to repeat the command and give the leash a little pull (NOT A YANK) to get his attention and get him moving in the right direction. Release the pull right away so you don't hurt him. Repeat the gentle tugs as needed, and give lots of verbal encouragement (and praise when he does it) as you go.

 

Now stop. If he keeps going, pull him with sharp gentle pulls beside you on the left. Dodger sat down right away when I said 'sit'. If your dog does not sit right away, then push his butt down, while pulling the leash upward, saying "(name of dog), Sit". The name comes first (to get the dogs' attention), then the command, preferably one word to avoid confusion. Release immediately upon compliance and praise generously. The goal is to have to dog walk beside you, and sit when you stop. (Later on you can vary the speed and direction you walk, or even run.)

 

Then again, "(name of dog) Heel" and repeat 3-4 times, keeping the walking times short. Praise heartily.

 

For 'Come" it is more predictable. While the dog is sitting from his heeling, walk a little ways away without saying anything. Then turn, and call "(name of dog), Come". If you prefer, you can use "Here" instead of come, but I find 'come' has a more urgent feel to it, more like 'come right now' versus 'come here and get a trea treat' which can be more leisurely. So I use "Dodger, COME". Then gently reel him in. Some dogs will sit automatically when they are in front of you, others need reminding to sit when they get to you.

Praise generously. Repeat a couple more times.

 

OK, the first training session, about 5 minutes of heel-sit and 5 min of come-sit, are all done. Play for 5 min as a reward, and to make the dog look forward to "work" times.

 

I was taught (and found it to be true) that a dogs attention span is not all that long - 15 min or so. I got my best results with two 15-min sessions a day. It does not take all that long, and the rewards are wonderful. Since some folks are afraid of German Shepherds, I think training Dodger is a must, so he will be a good neighbor as well as a good pal.

 

Once he masters these, we will move on, to 'Down' and start on 'Stay'.

 

We do 'quiet' all the time - simply saying "Dodger, QUIET" and gently holding his mouth closed (taking care not to sqeeze his nose too hard). He is picking that up slowly but surely. The problem is that all the other dogs have NOT been trained to be quiet, and it is hard for him to be the only one 'shutting up' when everybody else is 'sounding off'. But he does seem to be getting it.

 

Once he 'gets' the command, then we will start using the hand signal along with the command, and eventually he should learn to obey using just hand signals. I am still debating what to use as an 'attention' signal to get his attention so I don't have to say his name out loud - either a certain noise I make orally, or maybe a hand-clicker. I haven't decided yet which one would suit the needs of stealth.

 

Has anyone else trained their dog stealth-mode obedience? What worked for you?

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The very first word I taught Koa was "MINE"! At 3 months old, she liked lots of stuff to pull out and usually chew/destroy. But it was surprising how fast she knew what that meant and usually let me have my way. LOL Still use it to tell her to stop chasing the kitty....MINE! I emphasize the word so it's almost two syllables. My'-yeen! It also meant that if it was in her mouth, she needed to drop it. Finding out that SO MANY THINGS ARE MINE, she easily gives up anything to us. Sometimes it's just to see what she's got in her mouth. She rolls rocks in her mouth...not chewing...rolling. Bitty rocks the size of a half a pea or less. Would go thru her GI tract if she ever swallowed one so I let her have it. Brings them in from outside, drops them, we step on them...... Weird habit. :rolleyes: But she'll always spit them out for my inspection. She also like metal [staples, small screws, steel wool, bits of things] which I DON'T let her have! That's why I always check. She's as good as a metal detector...and we keep the property pretty picked up! "Yikes, My'-yeen! Gimme that!"

 

Conversely, I don't think she's really connected the opposite..."yours". I think "OK" is a better release word for her. Like...it was MINE and now you can have it. :shrug:

 

I always do hand signals for dogs too....cuz I talk with my hands and inadvertently teach hand signals even without being aware of it. ;) One of my early dogs had to tell me that.

 

My weirdest command word? "Tortilla" It means 'tortilla wrap' ...as in while on long retractable leash: "Koa, you're wrapped up around the [tree, fencepost, whatever] so go back the other way." I like to use words that are not too common in usage as much as possible and this one just kinda stuck. Both Big Dog and Koa have learned it and usually can get untangled by following my directions. Since we're talking steep hillsides that I DON'T want to climb up or down to undo them.....this is a goooood one!

 

DH's name has been "IS HE HERE?" thru the past two dogs too. Since it's when we hear his vehicle coming up the driveway...HIS, not any other vehicle and they know the engine sound. Of course our guinea pig in Maui could distinguish which engine was DH's and would start chirping "TREAT! TREAT! TREAT!" (guess who spoils the critters in this household?)

 

MtRider ....even the ducks have a 'come in for supper' signal.

Edited by Mt_Rider
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I agree about the choke chains. IF used PROPERLY for training they are a good tool. I hate the shock collars.

 

I don't know about 'stealth' training but I watch a pro train Great Dane dogs for service dogs nearly everyday. One of the first lessons she teaches is their name and to wait. She starts this when they are first weaned. She gets a small can of dog food and calls their name and give them a little bite with a spoon. Then she trains them to wait (they usually sit) for a bite. It's adorable to watch a 6 week old litter of puppies learn this. They don't get a bite unless they wait for it...no jumping around. And then when they are waiting nicely she calls their name and they know it's their turn to get a bite. Jumping around = no food. This is for a snack not their regular meal. This teaches their name and then to wait and to share. A spoon is one of the first things in her dogs mouth other than it's mother. She has hidden a lot of medicine in those spoons of food and the dogs are used to it thinking it's a special treat.

 

For leash training she has a small can of food and a spoon. She lets the dog pull on the leash for a few seconds and then while the dog is pulling away she offers a bite of the food. The dog comes to her to get the bite. Then she takes a few steps away and while the dog pulls away she offers another bite of food. The dog comes and gets it. Before you know it, the dog is walking beside her knowing in a few steps it will get a bite of food. After a few bites the dog forgets all about the leash and is focused on the food. She has a video of that but I couldn't find it. I'll look some more though.

 

Here is a couple of videos of her staff doing training. Ethel (1st. video) is the love of my life!

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I found the video on the leash training but it is chopped up into 4 short segments each about a half a minute. I'm not sure how it will post here but they are on page 2 on the site all the way at the bottom. Numbers 526, 527, 528 and 556.

https://servicedogproject.shutterfly.com/pictures/6

 

 

Edited to say there is audio on the videos

Edited by Jeepers
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Abby's been a handful from day one, but she's been smart as a tack in learning her commands. We took her to puppy classes when she was 3 months old & she got her certificate! LOL She knows "sit" and does it extremely well. Her "down" command she does with protest. For her "quiet" works very well also. She patiently "waits" for us to finish putting her dog food in her bowl & never charges the bowl, and we can reach in and take a morsel out and pretend to nibble on it for ourselves. If she's someplace she's not supposed to be we say "back up" and she literally does just that. "Where you supposed to be?" puts her immediately behind us when we go through doors. "Up" loads her into our pickup's back seat. "Inside" brings her in the house or in one of the RV's. "Wanna Hug?" gives her permission to come to us for a chest rub, a shoulder massage or a kiss (by her mommy) on the top of her head. "No lick" means stop that right now! "Leave It" is our drop it command, but she also responds to drop it. MrWE2 has fished a lot of "things" out of her mouth and she never bites...may tried to cheek it though! LOL "Toy" is her frisbee which she adores...it's the ultimate toy that she only gets to play with when we decide to. She also enjoys her "Greenie" which is an nearly indestructible green ball that we roll across the floor for her to fetch and return to us. Then...there's her "bone" which is her huge nylabone. The vet told us to pitch all those other crappy things that can be swallowed & swell in their gut and kill them, and that "snickers" must be an ultimate "treat". We buy the horse treats at the tractor supply; oats & carrots and oats & apples. Which brings us to our most difficult command ... her recall. She'll come pretty good to "Abby come" but the ultimate is "Abby, Treat" and she'll usually come to a screetching halt...and we HAVE to give her a treat. The only things that really give us trouble are rabbits, squirrels, cats, other dogs and people. She thinks other people should just adore her and that other dogs should want to play too. The rest of the animals...not sure what she'd do if she could catch them. We use a prong collar which only pinches (if put on properly, sized properly and used properly) when we walk her on leash. At 90# she's too big for me to hold her if she decides to make a run for it. I usually only have to give a tiny tug and she immediately "sits" and gives me a look as if asking "what do you want?" This is a wonderful topic here and I really appreciate all the info being shared. Even though she's 3 years old this month, we truly believe all dogs can learn at any age. We're fortunate that she's almost entirely "food" motivated (have to be careful or she's weigh far too much!) so teaching her something with a small treat is easy.

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Wow! All the replies have been inspiring, to say the least. The bigger the dog the more critical it is to teach them to get along with others (critters AND folks). Petey and Max (the aussies) already know come, heel, and fetch. Shake-paw is always done before dinner.

 

I learned to teach the hand signals in 4-H as well - my mom's German Shepherd liked nothing better than to show off her tricks, all with hand signals, the most dramatic trick being the 'drop on recall' which is to call the dog, then command them to stop and drop down as they return. The 4-H dog trainers taught it as a safety measure and there were many anecdotes about the dog comming in response to a call and not seeing a vehicle approaching;and the sudden 'down' command stopping them from crossing in front of it and getting killed. It's also the most dramatic as was the 'over the hurdle to fetch' command and always was saved as the finale to each dog obedience exhibition. I swear Mom's dog used to just strut when she heard applause!

 

Its raining, so we are working indoors on come and sit for our 2nd session tonight.

 

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Wow! All the replies have been inspiring, to say the least. The bigger the dog the more critical it is to teach them to get along with others (critters AND folks). Petey and Max (the aussies) already know come, heel, and fetch. Shake-paw is always done before dinner.

 

I learned to teach the hand signals in 4-H as well - my mom's German Shepherd liked nothing better than to show off her tricks, all with hand signals, the most dramatic trick being the 'drop on recall' which is to call the dog, then command them to stop and drop down as they return. The 4-H dog trainers taught it as a safety measure and there were many anecdotes about the dog comming in response to a call and not seeing a vehicle approaching;and the sudden 'down' command stopping them from crossing in front of it and getting killed. It's also the most dramatic as was the 'over the hurdle to fetch' command and always was saved as the finale to each dog obedience exhibition. I swear Mom's dog used to just strut when she heard applause!

 

Its raining, so we are working indoors on come and sit for our 2nd session tonight.

 

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Wow! All the replies have been inspiring, to say the least. The bigger the dog the more critical it is to teach them to get along with others (critters AND folks). Petey and Max (the aussies) already know come, heel, and fetch. Shake-paw is always done before dinner.

 

I learned to teach the hand signals in 4-H as well - my mom's German Shepherd liked nothing better than to show off her tricks, all with hand signals, the most dramatic trick being the 'drop on recall' which is to call the dog, then command them to stop and drop down as they return. The 4-H dog trainers taught it as a safety measure and there were many anecdotes about the dog comming in response to a call and not seeing a vehicle approaching;and the sudden 'down' command stopping them from crossing in front of it and getting killed. It's also the most dramatic as was the 'over the hurdle to fetch' command and always was saved as the finale to each dog obedience exhibition. I swear Mom's dog used to just strut when she heard applause!

 

Its raining, so we are working indoors on come and sit for our 2nd session tonight.

 

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I know you aren't service dog training but that is the only and best reference I have right now. These dogs are huge so they have to be taught manners right away! Another thing they are taught is when they have their little service vest on they are working and there is no playing around. Ever. Vest off is their time. Vest on is working. These dogs are trained to be with their person 24/7 mostly for mobility issues. They are taught early, to "achieve boredom". That means when their person is shopping or at a restaurant, the dog is either sitting still or lying down.

 

I always think of Mt. Rider and Koa when I see these dogs training and what wonderful lives they give their people. A lot of them go to vets who have post traumatic stress problems too. I love dogs!

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I know you aren't service dog training but that is the only and best reference I have right now. These dogs are huge so they have to be taught manners right away! Another thing they are taught is when they have their little service vest on they are working and there is no playing around. Ever. Vest off is their time. Vest on is working. These dogs are trained to be with their person 24/7 mostly for mobility issues. They are taught early, to "achieve boredom". That means when their person is shopping or at a restaurant, the dog is either sitting still or lying down.

 

I always think of Mt. Rider and Koa when I see these dogs training and what wonderful lives they give their people. A lot of them go to vets who have post traumatic stress problems too. I love dogs!

 

Abby-girl has her backpack that she wears when we're hiking or at large gatherings (pet friendly events) and when people make a comment about her "working" we simply say "if she eats and drinks she can carry her own" :-) We nearly always gat an applause! LOL She also wears her life vest when she swims. She'd prefer not to wear either but it's not her choice! LOL

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I use eyebrow training as well as commands of wait, back, or back up, go(away)

slow and easy. The eyebrow gets quicker response<G>

 

It really makes a difference as to what kind of dog you have as to training.

 

Eyebrow? Hmmm.....I have a pretty effective glower/disapproval stare. ;)

 

 

Yes, yes, and yes! I've met so many trainers that are naive enough to think EVERY dog will fall under the spell of THEIR PARTICULAR no-fail method of training. And if not....IT'S THE OWNER'S FAULT! [many owners are pathetic about being consistent or even observant with their pets [& children] but truly, that attitude is such a lame, no-fail excuse to fall back on.] Clicker-training people are particularly enthusiastic....without enough broad knowledge of such a variety in dog breeds. ....not to mention individual differences. Like horse people trying to train donkeys without making the adaption for an entirely different equine. [Lead a horse/drive a donkey....etc.]

 

The Livestock Guardian breeds are very specific dogs. For them....clicker? Puleeeze! They are thinking dogs and work WITH their humans. Their goals are different and with such specific breeding for those goals, ya gotta work with that. Yes, Koa learned 'shake'. But with purpose. With shake, she brings up one front paw at a time....and steps into her body harness. Good girl! Or gives paw for me to see if she has an owie.

 

I've had two dogs that simply did not even play. You could put a tennis ball into their open mouth ....and there wasn't even a response to bite down. The ball simply rolled out of their mouth and dog looks at you like....What do I what that in my mouth for? It isn't tasty; not food. Ptooey! Only one of the two was Lifestock Guardian. Koa does play but not in the way most other breeds/mixes that we've had. Ball is best enjoyed chewed to pieces. She'll chase and return in the house...but outside she's not much into chase. :shrug: She loves to play a Calvin&Hobbs version of Keep-Away Soccer using a plastic soda bottle on the icy packed snow of our parking area. Leap upon it with both front feet and sli-i-i-iding is one of the fun maneuvers for her. Not as interested in the dusty summer conditions.

 

Best is if you know what you have in general...as a breed. Then get to know the individual pup/dog. Always a challenge...and more so with certain breeds that simply do not have the PLEASE LET ME ADORE YOU attitude.

 

MtRider :wub:

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When Abby-girl was in puppy classes, they told us "Australian Shepherd; intelligent, wonderful family dogs and energetic...Labrador Retriever; intelligent, wonderful family dogs and energetic...unfortunately, putting them together into one dog? You have a puppy on crack"...and we've had to deal with it from our first day with her. One day she thinks she's supposed to "herd" us and the next day she things she's supposed to "retrieve" is :-( One of the most effective methods of training that we've found (and we've looked at several & just didn't agree with) were Jan Fennell. She's a loving but disciplined dog trainer. When Abby-girl gets "testy" (and sometimes that often!) we first totally ignore her...no looking, no speaking, nothing. If she persists (and sometimes she does) we take her by the collar (under much protect, believe me!) and lead her to the bedroom and put up our "gate of isolation". It takes a lot of self disclipline for US to stay with it until she "remembers" that her behavior is not acceptable, and decides to go "settle" like she was asked to do. They always tell us "oh, labs start to settle down in their 2nd year"...hasn't really happened. Other's say "labs settle down in their 3rd year ... or 5th year" ... we're still waiting :-) Maybe it's because we keep her thin & fit, but at 3 she can jump high enough (and she weighgs 90#) to look MrWE2 right in the eye (he's 6') when she's playing frisbie.

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For my beloved Turk, best LDG ever (may she RIP) she wanted at times to play

with plastic jugs. I tried to make sure she had several and left her to them.

I loved to watch her and perhaps for her it was practice as she could throw them

a good distance. But she brought them back to a particular place when she was

done with them.

I saw her in action one morning......a coyote was headed for the neighbors dairy cows.

She flew down our hill , under the gate, across the road ,under the fence and across the

neighbors pasture. She was on that coyote before it knew she was around. The coyote

went sailing through the air,(like the plastic jug) landed with a thump , picked its self up

and fled.

To start with the neighbor did not like her , but one day he saw her in action and from that

day forth he never said a word about her in his pasture.

His land was on two sides of our lower property so she kept a close watch .

Later he told me he had never lost another calf....

Turk passed away in her sleep this fall.

Edited by Twilight
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Yes, breeds do make a difference. Most of my beagles brains were in her nose. She couldn't help it. That's just the way beagles are. They are so scent driven that that is all that matters at the time. It didn't matter if it was bacon or a squirrel. Beagles must investigate. Their cuteness makes up for it though! :wub:

 

Edited for spelling. Sigh

Edited by Jeepers
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Jeepers, my dad raised beagles! To this day there is nothing I like to hear better than them 'bugle-ing' when they get all excited on a scent. I tried to train the beagles. One was not 'into' obedience training. She obeyed just fine, IF she felt like it. My dad said beagles were stubborn...a good trait for scent trailing, not for obedience training though!) Another beagle was more into obedience training and human companionship, and was less of a hunter. So it does matter about the breed and even the bloodline within the breed.

 

There were many different breeds in the classes, and I noticed the Golden Retrievers were more into socializing than obeying commands. (A good trait if you need a friendly dog who does not scare folks.) The poodles were quick to learn, almost obsessive about executing their commands. They were excellent at ignoring all distractions. The German Shepherds were calmer about it, and seemed to enjoy the human partnership angle. Collies seemed rather air-headed, but that was at the time that the breed was having trouble with over-breeding for the pointy noses and looks to the exclusion of any other traits. Im told they have more brains now, and calmer temperaments, since the craze for collies has died down some.

 

Dodger shows signs of enjoying working with humans, and seems to be a serious fellow. Definitely an obedience training candidate and a partner style relationship. Now Petie (100% aussie) learns quick, but has a much more cheerful and energetic demeanor, so he will need a different training style and emphasis. I think he would excel more in agility training, personally. Each has his strengths, and it should be fun working with them both. But ALL of the dogs (we also have Chihuahuas) are expected to learn/know/practice the basics - come, sit, stay, play nice with others. The rest is gravy. Heck, even our cats will come, sit and stay, but they work for treats, not praise. I works with what I gets...its all good clean fun!

Edited by kappydell
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Y'all dog lovers might want to pray for a loose dog trailing a leash in our neighborhood. For the past several days we've been sighting this dog. And we've had constant coyote sightings too. I shoot near the coyotes [can only shoot to kill on my own land and it's hard to get a good angle]. Koa announces both dog and coyote. Today was the first time I've had a good look at it.

 

It's going up and down our road. We left two little piles of dog food and hope it's the dog that finds it first. Fairly large and can move out quick. We met it on the road. I got out with a sample bag of dog food. I crouched down and did my best :wub: "C'mere, baby". But it's too frightened. It turned back for a second when I rattled the bag and poured a bit onto the snowy road. But then it ran again.

 

It's trailed all over our place ....you can see it's tracks and the 'snake line' where the leash is making a mark in the snow...snow .that keeps falling. Poor thing. Animal Control, which we keep updating with messages, is out for the holiday. If it's stayed away from coyotes so far, I hope it continues. Somebody didn't mean to lose this one. No one dumps a dog with a leash. :(

 

MtRider :pray:

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You're right Mt_R ... hopefully, nobody would dump a dog with a leash attached. If it's too frightened to come to someone who's friendly and feeing it (it can smell you on the food) I'm not sure animal control could get near it either, and will probably use a live trap :-( Sometimes that's the only way and it's very traumatic (at first) for the animal. :pray:

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Im praying hard for that poor scared pup...keep feeding him, maybe it will over-ride its fear...

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People do some rather unkind things to dogs.. it maybe trying to find its owner

because it was dumped in your area- more or less waiting for the owner to

come back. It may have been riding in the back of the truck and jumped/fell

out.... To be so nervous sounds like it has been mistreated or either out for a long time?

 

Reason I say this...... one winter when we were working on the neighbors farm

we saw a dog beside the road lying on a coat. We drove slowly by and saw he

was not hurt but decided that the owner would pick him up and we went on to

work. Still there that evening, the next morning , evening, the next morning,

we had been taking extra for lunch and if any was left over from breakfast we

would give it to him as we went by. That evening we stopped and took him home ,

as the weather was fixing to turn bad.

 

As far as we could tell he was beagle/ dachshund too long for a beagle to short

for a doxie. He was a wonderful dog and when my aunt and uncle came up from

La they fell in love with him and begged us to give him to them. 2 years later he

gave his life for my aunt attacking 4 big dogs all by himself to keep them off her.....

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Off topic, but...

The vet is closed for the weekend. My dog has been antisocial for a few days. When I finally noticed he was not eating, I called him inside and took a good look at him. His upper lips are badly swollen. His entire face is somewhat swollen. He has white mucus in his eyes and nostrils. He is somewhat lethargic but not extremely so. Do you think benadryl would help? He slurped up a little chicken broth, but seemed to drool it all out in thick ropes over the next several seconds. He is not having any apparent trouble breathing.

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Poor little guy. Wonder if he got bit or stung by something. Pray it wasn't a poisoning!! Benadryl is safe for dogs and it probably wouldn't hurt. Here is the dosage chart:

 

http://benadrylfordogs.info/benadryl-dosage-for-dogs/

 

 

Edited because:

I tried to copy/paste the chart from the site and it didn't work.

Edited by Jeepers
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