Jump to content

DIY Dog Training


kappydell

Recommended Posts

  • Replies 59
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

Top Posters In This Topic

Posted Images

Yikes, I just noticed that was ForwardThinker's first post. So.....

WELCOME, WELCOME, WELCOME!!!

 

I'm printing it out and putting it in my 'animal' file too and bookmarking it. It's easy to understand, 1mg per pound, but in a stressful situation I'd never remember. I probably won't even remember tomorrow.

Link to comment

Printed this out and saved it on my thumb drive for future reference. We've given Abby otc generic benadryl many times. When she was spayed, the vet told us to give her 3 caps twice a day to help keep her calm. Her spay was a laser surgery so no stitches, so she had to remain calm. She (the vet) told us "forget human dosages...for dogs it doesn't apply". When Abby starts her Labrador-trait of ear allergies (not mites) we clean her ears out with baby wipes and then use gentian (sp?) violet mixed with some witch hazel and a pinch of "something" (borax or boric acid?) will have to look up the recipe! in her ears, and then the benadry in a pill pocket. She's fine in a day or less. Have used this method for several years...after paying almost $50 for the vet's ear wash and prescription ear drops :-(

Link to comment

We keep benadryl for our dogs too. The training phase is just about completed now for all of them.

 

Dodger (the german shepherd/malinois...we think....) has calmed down after being 'fixed'. He is a great favorite here at the campground we are wintering at - friendly and gentle as can be. He even cares tenderly for our 'special needs' cats who love him dearly, snuggling with him to sleep. He has decided he likes to play fetch, so now he and Petie play tag-team catch. We call out one of their names as we throw the ball, both chase it, then the designee brings it back, escorted by the other dog.

He also dearly loves to just lay out in the 'yard' (as he thinks of our spot here in the campground) and watch the world go by,but barks to alert us to anyone entering 'his' area. We are more impressed than ever with him. He is our 'thinking' dog that considers us partners, not masters. He would rather die than let us down.

 

Petie (the mini aussie) can be hyper, but considers his job is herding the cats. When they get into something we squirt them with a spray of water to get them to stop, and Petie sees us pick up the squirt bottle and starts looking excitedly for the miscreant so he can chase it away from the no-no zone. They run into a hidey hole and he struts back as if to say 'there, I took care of it!' He too loves the 'special' kitties, and often grooms them and they groom him back. The other cats like him too, unless he is chasing them in response to the sound of the squirt bottle!

 

Max is the other aussie, he is 'mellow-man-max' and never gets excited unless he sees someone he knows. Then he wags his whole rear end in glee and greets them with gentle kisses. He never jumps up, but will paw you or kiss you to get your attention.

Everybody loves his calm, serious demeanor.

 

The Chihuahuas (Snickers & CIndi) are both alarm dogs - barking and acting fierce until you take a step toward them; then they run out of range and start barking again. They are our alarm dogs - it is impossible to sleep with their insistent barking and bouncing around on the bed!

 

All have learned to sit, stay and walk nicely on a leash without pulling, which is a real asset when we travel. They all beg for food, in their own ways....from the steely stare of the aussies (while they 'will' you to give them treats) to the cute sitting up of the chihuahuas, and the offering of the paw from the Shep-Malinois they are all (finally) pretty well trained to suit. Each had to be trained in his own way though, as his temperament demanded.

Link to comment

What a cool report, Kappy!!!! Fun to read about your hard-won success in melding your cat/dog/human family. :wub: They all sound amazing!

 

Regarding your largest dog....

 

Each had to be trained in his own way though, as his temperament demanded.

 

ABSOLUTELY. Never saw that so much as with Big Dog and Koa. The Livestock Guardian Breeds .....the "thinking dog" breeds are vastly different. I describe interaction with them as with a "precocious 4 yr old child". {BigDog was a precocious 4 yr old child with autistic tendancies! What a challenge she was!!!} They have to see the reason of what you're doing/asking of them. They understand and remember things in different ways than ....well frankly, dogs with smaller brain mass? Perhaps the larger brain mass means more complexity potential? Dunno...probably overgeneralizing. But they are different.

 

Kappy mentions "....considers us partners, not masters." Yesssss on that too. You can be -and need to be - the head honcho of the pack. But .....that still means some ..."discussion".... may occur about a command. "Are we realllly sure that's the best thing for me to be doing right now???" A four year old will "discuss" a lot too. A precocious one will demand to know why....prove it's what needs to be done.

 

And....they like patterns! A thinking dog will recognize and anticipate patterns. Even more subtle ones that you don't know you're doing. Other dogs like these too, of course. I actually try hard to break up patterns that I might have a hard time keeping. Things as simple as putting Koa in either side of the truck is a good idea. If a time would come where she must enter the driver's side.....a delay to convince her that it's the same as the other door :rolleyes: might actually be a danger. So I try to keep some inconsequential patterns broken up a bit. But going in doors and down stairs BEHIND ME...is one I like to keep. Because she's a GUARDian dog....on walks she precedes me. Or rather, she's all around me on her XL retractable leash. It's her time to explore/check out/sniff/dig/whatever. But then, I'll change it up so she walks beside me. Cuz like the other night, I need her as my walking-assist. We developed a pattern for both modes. She likes her free-range time better.... :lol: ....but will comply to help me too. Finally found a position she's comfortable with to assist me on our steep stairs.

 

 

I laughed at Kappy's description of the dog assisting with the cat's misbehavior. From the day I brought little Koa puppy home, my old, senior cat has taken on the job of putting in her two cents [a loud, emphatic hisssssss!] to scold Koa if I'm correcting her. It certainly intimidated Koa pup! {wail....EVERYbody is mad at me!} Cat still appears but there is rarely something I'm correcting Koa on now. EXCEPT for one thing......playfully bouncing after the cat. Koa is just TOO BIG to be playing that game. Ya wonder if she's still getting her back???? Or...keeping the cat prisoner in the bathroom or kitchen. Koa innocently lays across the door ways...... :engel-smilies-10-1: so cat can't come out. Sheesh! Those two have their very own relationship!

 

MtRider .....furry friends enhance our lives so much! :happy0203:

Edited by Mt_Rider
Link to comment

We keep benadryl for our dogs too. The training phase is just about completed now for all of them.

 

Dodger (the german shepherd/malinois...we think....) has calmed down after being 'fixed'. He is a great favorite here at the campground we are wintering at - friendly and gentle as can be. He even cares tenderly for our 'special needs' cats who love him dearly, snuggling with him to sleep. He has decided he likes to play fetch, so now he and Petie play tag-team catch. We call out one of their names as we throw the ball, both chase it, then the designee brings it back, escorted by the other dog.

He also dearly loves to just lay out in the 'yard' (as he thinks of our spot here in the campground) and watch the world go by,but barks to alert us to anyone entering 'his' area. We are more impressed than ever with him. He is our 'thinking' dog that considers us partners, not masters. He would rather die than let us down.

 

Petie (the mini aussie) can be hyper, but considers his job is herding the cats. When they get into something we squirt them with a spray of water to get them to stop, and Petie sees us pick up the squirt bottle and starts looking excitedly for the miscreant so he can chase it away from the no-no zone. They run into a hidey hole and he struts back as if to say 'there, I took care of it!' He too loves the 'special' kitties, and often grooms them and they groom him back. The other cats like him too, unless he is chasing them in response to the sound of the squirt bottle!

 

Max is the other aussie, he is 'mellow-man-max' and never gets excited unless he sees someone he knows. Then he wags his whole rear end in glee and greets them with gentle kisses. He never jumps up, but will paw you or kiss you to get your attention.

Everybody loves his calm, serious demeanor.

 

The Chihuahuas (Snickers & CIndi) are both alarm dogs - barking and acting fierce until you take a step toward them; then they run out of range and start barking again. They are our alarm dogs - it is impossible to sleep with their insistent barking and bouncing around on the bed!

 

All have learned to sit, stay and walk nicely on a leash without pulling, which is a real asset when we travel. They all beg for food, in their own ways....from the steely stare of the aussies (while they 'will' you to give them treats) to the cute sitting up of the chihuahuas, and the offering of the paw from the Shep-Malinois they are all (finally) pretty well trained to suit. Each had to be trained in his own way though, as his temperament demanded.

 

:thumbs:

Link to comment

Had to chuckle when Kappie posted how the Aussie's had that "stare"! I get it all the time. Abby-girl sits at my knees and stares, so I'm thinking I'm getting the same treatment Kappie! LOL And the Aussie part of her wants to herd us :-( She's just the right height to put her nose where she shouldn't in her effort to "identify" and herd :-( So she gets some sharp voice corrections when she does that. Loved reading your post kappie!

Link to comment
  • 5 months later...

oh Lordy! Dodger (shep-mal) is also the right size to put his nose in the most personal areas.....i think there is a little mischief in that trick! The herding instincts in both aussies and Dodger are very noticeable - they love to push on us to try to 'herd' us over to the food dishes when we are carrying something that smells good, LOL.

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.