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Mt_Rider

Elderly, disabled, special needs.....RURR?

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http://beprepared.com/blog/18453/6-ways-prepare-people-special-needs-disabilities/?utm_source=Sailthru&utm_medium=email&utm_term=Master%20-%20Promotions&utm_campaign=emer0709%20-%20INEM3231&sc=EMAIL&oc=INEM3231

 

Emergency Essentials has a whole archive of articles. Here is one about prepping for disabilities/elderly/etc.

 

It starts with a story of a 'special needs' 10 yr old. How her family comes to realize a little bit more how SHE hears the world around her. I can Soooooooooo relate. I also have earplugs with me at all times. I can easily be completely overwhelmed with NOISE :imoksmiley:...yes! To the point of falling down. Sound that other folks don't even notice as bothersome. [sometimes they even call it "music" argh! ] :band:

 

 

If things get rough, these are the populations that will 'crater' first. If you or a loved one has 'special needs'....this is the time to make sure you REALIZE what their needs are. Like this family, you might think you know but.......you might be surprised. Some disabled folks can't even express their needs....or if they do, NO ONE TAKES THEM SERIOUSLY! Many newly diagnosed still haven't figured out what they need and what might help. Press them to think outside the box for solutions/equipment that will work in any type of Hooey Hits Fan scenario. [most certainly plan for lack of electricity and for possible evac]

 

The above article has links to FEMA, etc who have suggested lists that might be a good starting point. One link seems to be broken tho??

 

MtRider ....in local disasters or regional crisis...not so bad. But major Hooey...do the best you can. :shrug:

Edited by Mt_Rider

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Not to be blunt but those dependent on meds, oxygen, dialyses... You know what I am going to say right?

As awful as it is, there is no chance for them to survive.

Less severe disabled, perhaps with a good family and knowledge of plants, herbs and old skool meds.

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Well the very tech-dependent folks....yes. We all know that. :(:pray:

 

But there are a whole slew of the rest of us....between just special needs of some sort to disabled and older folks.

 

eyeglasses.... [two is one and one is none]

sunglasses ..for those of us that find glare absolutely BLINDING

binoculars?

magnifying lens

 

hearing aids/lots of batteries

ear plugs [for those of us who can be easily overstimulated]

 

mobility aids: scooter with battery charger [solar], wheelchairs, canes, walkers, hiking sticks,

braces: for all joints that might get a sprain/strain

Splints: for those that need that [like over night use]

 

special shoes/arch supports

 

OTC meds...pain relievers for the simple stuff that can be debilitating, etc.

 

Bowel support products: pills for regulation, washable diaper products,

 

Sleep aid pills

Other things to aid sleep: pillow, extra warmth [down quilt], light mask, etc

 

cooling devices

hot packs

 

Camp chair comfortable for the affected person

 

Special diets.....that's ANY age.

 

 

Lets move the parameters out a bit. We MUST KEEP IN MIND that ANY weak point physically [or mentally/emotionally] for anyone, will be exacerbated by harsh circumstances. Anything outside of "normal" routines. If ANYone has trouble with anything occasionally, you can be pretty sure it will occur during some crisis.

 

 

Example: DH has had knee trouble off and on thru the years. During our EVAC, yep, he pulled the durned thing on Day 2. Where was his brace? Back at the evacuated cabin...inaccessible.

 

 

MtRider ....mostly, this description just struck me as important. Important to really KNOW what your loved one is experiencing, so you can adapt around it.

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Interesting thoughts.

 

I'be been thinking what I would have to do with MIL. She has prescription meds that are necessary, and they won't allow her to 'stock up'. Would she be able to survive without them? IDK.

 

 

 

Most who see me, have no clue I am disabled. Those who know me, can only imagine what it is like. :imoksmiley:

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We have to make sure our support folks around us KNOW how to support us. That's a bit different from the usual, "stiff upper lip" that we'll normally portray. But you can see that won't work once our normal routines are blasted outta the water by drastic change in circumstances. Prepping includes an honest revelation of our 'stuff'. Yeah?

 

And we can prepare our own equipment and supplies. But our support folks need to know when, how.....if we aren't able to handle our 'stuff' by ourselves in a post-hooey world.

 

 

MtRider :shrug: Choose support folks that will have compassion to want to help without being sappy. The intelligence to understand what is truly needed. And the discernment to know when to let you make your own choices.

Edited by Mt_Rider

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I find it is VERY difficult to get 'normal' people to understand about how dangerous high temps can be to anyone who cannot regulate their body temps well. At only 80* I am in serious danger of dehydrating if I put forth any effort at all since I cannot take in enough liquids to keep up with perspiration. I literally ithave puddles of sweat dripping off bare skin and totally saturated garments and hair. Even sitting still I am perspiring freely. In an emergency situation where I am forced into activity at high temps I become not just dehydrated but overheated and my body temperature rises several degrees.

 

I try to do all my work in the early morning but when anyone is coming to do work at my place they ALWAYs come after it gets hot. Invariably I end up running around outside in the heat before the work is finished and have migraines and dehydration to deal with before it is over.

 

What I'm trying to say is, please take people seriously when they say that they can't handle the heat or other conditions that you, yourself don't have a problem with other than minor discomfort.

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People with life-threatening allergies have that problem too. Food or other exposure reallllllly CAN kill some people ....and rather quickly. Yes, even a small bite [oh, it won't hurt you!] can send them to the ER. Fortunately the general public is slowly coming into this knowledge. But sometimes families are THE WORST about getting on board with these things.

 

Why IS that?

 

Denial.....no, my child is fine; doesn't have bee sting allergy that can kill him. Not my precious boy! I won't hear of it!

 

Jealous of the "special" status......oh you're just trying to get attention. Eating shellfish is just fine. Shut up and quit making a fuss.

 

Lazy......I'm not going to buy all that special food for you. You'll eat what I cook and that's that's the end of this nonsense!

 

 

 

......we've all heard versions of these. <_< So as adults we can cover ourselves...to a certain degree.

 

I'm saying there is more than that. Look especially to your elderly people. THEY usually are not up to speed with the changes they begin to experience. They also have denial and lack of knowledge or motivation for their own increasing difficulties. I'm constantly trying to keep my [now-elderly] folks informed on how they can deal with new "CAN'T DO's" But then, they've heard it all from me for a couple decades. "Oh now I know what you were talking about..." I've made sure they have "walking sticks" for moving around their mountain property. My dad inherited one of my canes. This is the time they are needing stuff I've used for a long time. We need to keep an eye on our older loved ones....to see if they are making the adaptions that keep them safe and more active. AND make sure you or they prep for this.

 

MtRider :wub:

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My dh doesn't "get it", he will work in the heat, complain, and then continue to work in the heat. If you ask/tell him to come in before he gets sick, he then tells you it is not that bad......changes shirts, feels poorly and complains some more!!!!!!!!!!

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:coffeescreen:

 

 

:busted:

 

 

I really don't wanna say how many months YEARS it took me to finally GET IT about MS. But I have to say that the aging issues that are coming on now....piece of cake! :cakeslice: MS is sometimes called "Premature Aging" because so many symptoms follow the aging process. Including more heat and cold sensitivity. But EVENTUALLY I got the insight that doing this ------> :banghead: ........ was stoooopid. Quit doing things that I KNEW would cause a pay-back I didn't like. Everyone chooses...... :shrug:

 

 

MtRider .....having the same life issues as my mother......BEFORE my mother has them. :wacko:

Edited by Mt_Rider

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I hear and relate so much to what all of you have said. I certainly sweat a lot and now i am putting a V8 juice bottle of water beside me when I sit down after my morning coffee on most days here because when the humidity goes up and heat, even though its not really been as hot as the last few summers, I sweat all over and my head is dripping, I guzzle that water, in fact, along with decaf tea and toss in V8 juice if i have it. It is very difficult for me to work in the heat , as I learned now with the labor of moving myself. I had to really pace myself. It sure is not what I used to be able to do. So if I have to vamoose, I am going to be very careful about my projects. Yes, work early and before dusk, break and rest after lunch time. Have enough food that its easy to eat , cold maybe, for supper time. Obviously if the stuff hits the fan and I am around a fishing area, i will be doing primitive fishing methods, fish traps likely I can just go check on periodically and harvest fish, move them a bit, etc, now and then, because I won't have time to stand on a stream's edge mostly, and waste that time needed to do other stuff at the pace I can handle. I can smoke or dry the fish after its clean and I eat a fresh portion for the next meal, preserve the rest. Traps for meat. I have other things to acquire meat with , but need to be conservative about it , and they are bulky items. Noticeable to others as well, and that may not be easy to manage, depending on who might come around.

 

( I can make a primitive spring house with all these creeks around here for refrigeration needs. So that will help with food preservation and ready to eat stuff, too. ) Root Cellar, or dug caches.

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One of the things I learned was from a trappers book, an old classic. You set up your traplines in wagon wheel fashion from a central hub point. Ok, consider the lay of the land. Any obstacles may cut out a percentage of that circle but one might find a spot where that is basically useful. Different areas to do different things. Some of the European ancient farmers used to set up their farms in a circle shape like that , divided like pie from their farm house.

Even in a mountain, slope and valley area like my area here, I can still do this, and it actually can work with the weather considerations and wind patterns as well.

 

Practice in your mind , in the region you are in, how you could use an area that is round or oblong in shape. Move that circle around on a topo map if you have one of your area, see where it might fit and what benefits that portion gives you, or if you have land..... whats useful about it if there are no more utilities.

 

Besides the hours in each day, if you have things segmented, you can begin to envision the work, maybe at different times of the year and coordinate mentally the amount of tasks, you would have , what your manpower is ( some of us are just a couple or even single and we are getting older or have health conditions..... what can we do to simplify and make it so it doesn't hurt us or be too much to manage? )

 

Some of us may end up doing more living off the land if we have an extended emergency if we have not been able to prepare or used up preps already do to our own situations over the past several years.

 

I figure the circle idea is helpful in not letting me get lost out there. I have been living mostly in a box for too long, literally. An apartment is a box. So, it's going to take some exploring. The weather is finally getting drier more than saturated and saturating and its verdant out there now. I am recuperating enough that I can handle some rides and walks on some deer trails or in the preserves areas in the next few weeks ahead. Getting familiar is very important, with my actual surroundings.

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Setting up your physical area and/or necessary chores so that it takes the least amount of energy, steps, fine-motor coordination....that is an excellent addition to this topic! Any of that, thought out ahead of time....put into use ahead of time, will be excellent.

 

For Shelter In Place.....start it now. Fine tune things like having tools at point-of-use....even if you have to buy more hammers, shovels, etc. [i don that!] Make the chores go in a logical progression so you don't have to redo steps.

 

One thing I see immediately with the wagon wheel spokes.......you never get too far from your shelter-safety-supplies. :thumbs: Even if you have to crawl back to base camp.

 

 

For a Bug Out ...keep this in mind as well.

 

 

MtRider .....hmmm, thinking on this. I've fine tuned my chores thru the years but the physical layout if not good to start. Don't have much to work with on this rented property tho.

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My D-ex never quite got it that I can not tolerate heat the way he can. He never really said anything, but I could feel it and see it in the attitude. Maybe it was just me feeling guilty. I donno. I do know that I can not do heat for very long, like 10 minutes, without passing out or getting very nauseous.

I can do pretty good in the heat as long as I have a fan. I used to sit out in the garage while son mowed the grass...with a fan on me. He understood and when I'd get up to do something he'd tell me to go sit down. It's so hard for me to sit and watch someone else work. Very hard. I feel lazy. But for him, it was enough that I was just out there with him.

That is one reason I'd like to have some sort of generator. I don't need or want a big one. Just enough power to run a small dorm size refrigerator, a fan and maybe juice up the Kindle, cell phone or perhaps the computer from time to time. If I have a fan going I can sleep better too. I love fans.

I bought some of those cheap folding hand type fans and have them all over the place. I have them in the garage, in the car, my purse, beside the bed, beside the chair...well you get it. They came a dozen to a pack and are cheap enough that if they don't last I'm not out much. About 33 cents each. Especially good for 'power surges' too.

http://www.orientaltrading.com/asian-folding-fan-assortment-a2-9_84.fltr?prodCatId=551689

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Ah yes, I was thinking about my SIL who had a devastating accident last year. Broke his neck, shattered vertebrea and on meds to keep his heart going. Paralysed from armpits down.

He, frankly, doesn't stand a chance.

 

Less severe cases, there are ways around. Fortunately.

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I don't think we should underestimate the effect this would have on all of us. If EMP or something that did shut down electric for a lengthy period of time...... There would be a horrific number that die within the first few days to a week.

 

How do we handle that? Would we be too strained in trying to adapt ourselves to be able to process it....at that time? We'd all probably know someone who really needs modern means to stay alive for very long. Whether the most severe who would die within minutes or hours.....to those who need sustaining meds which would eventually run out.....

 

 

MtRider ....sorry to hear of your SIL, Christy. :(

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