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Mt_Rider

Local grown...implications for PostHooey

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No walking to anything around here. If I can't grow it in the back yard we will do without. So I am researching small animals like chickens, rabbits and doves or quail for a meat source. Stocking what I can that we can't get and hubby can't live without aka coffee and chocolate. But most of all scraping the 10 year plan and starting over.

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What high calorie foods can you grow there, Mommato3? Like grains, taters, etc?

 

MtRider :lois:

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Ok who ate my post? I want it back LOL :24:

 

Mt. Rider, I probably can grow red potatoes. We are on the edge of the dust bowl. The farmers around here grow corn, millet and cotton. They pump tons of water to grow these crops only to sale to the feed lots for cattle. The veggie gardens are further south like 2 hours away. We are hoping the oil field booms again soon so the housing market will take off and we can sale and move south. Until there I will be ordering lots of stuff.

Edited by mommato3boys

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Good point, Mommato3! We need to remember the implications of mandatory irrigation for the current crops. Post-Hooey-Hits-Fan....doubt there would be much wide-sale irrigation possible.

 

MtRider :yar:

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That's for sure, Ambergris. Sooooo many tips we learn here!

 

MtRider :pc_coffee:

 

Mt Rider and Ambergris.

I have learned so much here.

There are not very many people i know who prep.

So this is my place to come when i need help.

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We used to have a lot more of this particular kind of information under discussion. The group's focus has changed, especially with the loss of Westlake and CGA, and with others having drifted away.

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We used to have a lot more of this particular kind of information under discussion. The group's focus has changed, especially with the loss of Westlake and CGA, and with others having drifted away.

 

:sigh: I miss them too..... and all their info... I'll use the search feature and find the info, but they are generally old threads.

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Back to topic: Around here, greens are abundant ten months of the year, and are so easy to grow that kindergarteners do it. Protein can be had. Carbohydrates are easy to grow en masse, but difficult to produce in a normal suburban garden. I've tried growing rice in a five gallon bucket and got dismal returns. I've scattered rice along the edge of the pond and delighted no one but the wild geese. The same effort put into a butternut squash or seminole squash on a hog-panel trellis would have paid me back in vastly more fiber-dense, vitamin-dense, carb-rich food.

 

The limiters here are 1) usable, defensible growspace, which most everyone these days can identify with, 2) storage--things go bad fast, and we have an abundance of hungry bugs--and 3) that three- to nine-week period every summer when it's so hot and humid that rabbits die in the deep shade with fans on them, plants stop producing, everything spoils, the fish won't bite, and only the pests breed.

 

So I guess what I need to be looking for is a food-partner who has the room to grow field corn.

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I've scattered rice along the edge of the pond and delighted no one but the wild geese.
:coffeescreen:

 

"Food Partner" ......now that's an interesting concept! Hmmm....

 

I have heard about that Seminole squash. Is it true it last quite a while if part of the stem is still attached? 'Tis way out of our climate range for such as that type tho.

 

Our only real carb is taters. And they always begin to sprout about March. [stupid things...spring isn't until the last week in April!] Even in our very cool and mostly dark basement. Only light is when we turn one on to do laundry or get something. You can keep knocking the sprouts off and using them but the sprouting is taking some of the nutrient from the potato. We'd probably have to migrate after our stored carbs ran low.

 

We'd have to rely on sprouting seeds for nutrient and fresh food enzymes [for digestion] during most of our frigid year. DH has taken up this project and is in the trial/error [stinks when there is error] stage. He's learning to watch the trays carefully and use them quickly. He's trying a lot of different seeds. Make the errors now while we can still restock.

 

We're trying greens in a large pot....again. Sometimes the stupid squirrels get everything before it has a chance to grow..as it's growing.

 

:darth duck: ....course, post-Hooey situation, the squirrels and other small meat animals would take a dive in their populations! Same with Ambergris' wild geese! :feedme:

 

We're hoping for the time/energy to put up a greenhouse. We've had the pole structure in use elsewhere but, given some energy, I can switch that and free it up for use as greenhouse. I have the plastic for exterior. It's way past time to begin trial-error in that method.

 

MtRider .....not really sure why THAT idea didn't dawn on my brain a couple years ago. :wacko:

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There are a few different things that are called seminole squash. They could all be the same thing that diverged as different seed reacted to different microclimates or people chose seed for what they wanted instead of what they had, or there could be completely different origins with people just all calling what they had seminole squash. (Or seminole pumpkin.) Sugar level, shape, and color vary, but they're clearly all moschatas. They substitute for butternut or for pie pumpkin in recipes. I have not tried to store seminole squash, but my buddies who have say they get a lot sweeter over the course of the first month on the shelf, and then stay good for five to seven months. My first ex mother in law grew butternut squash, a very similar moschata, and stored them on the floor of her large utility room, or on the shelves of the laundry room. They got sweeter after the first three to four weeks in storage. We had them in pie at Christmas every year. We had them in soup at Valentine's, too. We usually had one or two left when it was time to start seeds for the spring planting.

 

MdRider, if the idea had dawned on you a few years ago, the plastic would be weather-torn to bits by now.

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Interesting about the squash. Sounds like a good resource tho.

 

Naw....I've collected rather a lot of plastic cuz UV destroys it fairly quick at this altitude. I covered the cukes/zukes/yellow summer squash in the garden one year with this thing. Trying to grow warm weather crops. Had wonderful huge plants in that hot greenhouse. But effort was still wasted by blossom end rot (or some such). Never did solve that problem. :scratchhead: Would see deer laying down, sprawled against the warm sides on the chilly mornings.... :rolleyes: HEY!

 

This idea is to grow some things that...with a good start, could survive thru the fall frosts....early winter... inside there. Different than trying to get warm weather crops to grow - always a chancy deal up here. This would keep plants known to be viable-in-our-climate alive longer. And some micro-growing in succession. Like small lettuce and keep planting and harvesting til the season gave up.

 

But to have things like chard, collards, spinach to survive the colder fall, they have to get growing now. Once it's that chilly, they stay alive and fresh, but don't put on new growth. Oddly, part of our problem is too many cloudy hours in a day. If we set up this greenhouse close to the house, we could run some lights too. Trying to decide where we can squeeze it in. THAT's a problem cuz one cannot walk 10' feet in any direction without beginning to go severely UP or DOWN hill. Even out our back door....about 7' to the UP hillside. Then....think of a deluge of rain some days.....

All planting up here on our hill has to be in pots/containers. There is zero 'soil' up here tho there is down near creek/pond. Merely crushed granite. Adding 'soil' on top doesn't work long cuz the soil percolates down thru the rock too fast. Raised table top beds would help the gardening effort for 'old folks' anyway. Humidity is saved inside there too.

 

This is why I should have been experimenting before this....when the voles and drought all but shut us down. .....Hmmm, :shakinghead: haven't seen voles this year? Mebbe they migrated again...outta here? I sure hope so.

 

MtRider ...can't get more local than your own back yard... :lois:

Edited by Mt_Rider

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Have you ever talked to your local home extension agri. folks? They know the who, what, when, where, why and how. Plus they have already done the success/failure experiments. Might be a good place to ask.

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Here is an article about food shortages in Venezuela. So they got ambitious and began to grow their own gardens to supplement.

 

YET.....the last statement reflects what we're talking about here:

 

http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2016/07/04/hunger-on-rise-amid-venezuela-economic-crisis-some-turn-to-urban-gardens-for/?intcmp=hplnws

 

 

 

Francisco Salazar, head of a community council that works in Caracas slums, says he and his neighbors are growing beets, black beans, lettuce and dozens of other vegetables in a large community garden.

But he worries it won't be enough.

"We don't have flour, we don't have pasta, we don't have rice," he said. "What we have is a Band-Aid that's not going to really solve the problem."

 

 

MtRider :lois:

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