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Scheduling and Organizing


Daylily

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I like to look at organizing blogs to get ideas. I'm trying to declutter and get organized plus do better at scheduling gardening and other homestead tasks. So many of the blogs are for suburbanites who really don't do the things I need to do, or from moms with small children. Do any of you folks have any good tips and ideas for scheduling home and garden tasks, etc?

 

I learned from this blog good ideas for setting up an easy file system. I'm still looking for the ultimate system!

 

http://lifeyourway.net/creating-a-file-system-that-works-the-ultimate-guide/

 

I just found this one too.

 

http://timewarpwife.com/house-cleaning-schedule/

 

Can you recommend some good blogs?

 

 

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Hi Daylily, how big or how many garden spaces will you be doing in 2017?

As for scheduling, funny you should mention that. I am working on fixing my sleep and waking routine. It is getting better and that consistency helps me with everything else as it is fundamental.

I do my breakfast and dishes after about half an hour allotted to coffee first. This is an ongoing learn-a-new-habit for me. I find I waste up to two hours in the morning if I don't. ( I discclean, defrag and restart my laptop which is old and slow during breakfast prep.)

Then its definitely time to get dressed in whatever clothes I need for what I will do for chores, and do all that nifty stuff gals will do to be publically presentable. For some if you have other folks at home, you may change this time frame according to your needs.

 

Once that is done, when it comes to garden chores, watering in the morning if it is needed, is best from all I read --- it has been a long time since I grew a garden. But I plan on doing watering when I step outside in the mornings if it needs it, or weeding and mulching and stuff like that.

While it remains cool and the winds here have not picked up yet.

 

Getting the other plots ready for warmer planting schedules, or earliest stuff---- working with seedlings inside, before I can plant outside, just do that at that time of day too. That way it is done and I can make sure my cat did not get into any of it or mess it up and if she did then I can straighten that out and clean it up before anyone comes over, for one thing.

 

After watering, weeding, then bush trimming, and digging plots, heavier work for a while.

Then it would be close to lunch or I need to get bread dough made to rise for baking later, stuff like that I would do and it gives me a break inside the house.

I could have other chores to do and work on my writing to do, or errands and this is a good time to get those done unless I do it earlier occasionally.

 

Dinner prep could be anything depending on whats for dinner , and any amount of time from short to two hours time or so, so that adjusts per day too, but I often don't feel like eating til 8 pm so I have time to go out and work the garden in the early evenings, too.

 

Of course, cool weather crops would be harvested morning time and cleaned for the frig as time goes on. Warm weather crops are more adjustable and onions and potatoes ---- as I will grow them need daytime drying outside for first bit of prep for storage purposes unless some get canned.

 

 

In the past several days I wrote out a rough sketch, of my garden areas I want to have. Since I have to start from scratch in this yard and I am not sturdy like I was in my twenties, working sections , one at a time to get them established works for me, and for one area some top soil needs to be delivered before I could do anything with it as that is where the sewer drain line area was dug up and it wreaked havoc on how level things are now, but there are other areas I can do stuff with even if that got delayed a few weeks , besides its for long summer crops anyway , that area.

 

The areas I do not garden in need grass reseeded and serious edging work too, so that will be implemented too , in spring of 2017. This poor yard was neglected a very long time and what lawn is still around is sadly neglected even for an average yard.

 

I do not know of any blogs.

 

Here are some websites that may give you good info and ideas.

 

Take into account where you get sun, partial sun and shade in your growing months. If you can do spring, summer and fall crop , you can probably keep yourself in a good variety of produce for most of the year if you have enough space. With compost and adding back decent nutrients you will feed your soil and can improve it and produce much more and healthier plants. Even do gardening very intensely if you figure it out, and plant closer because you are feeding it, plus it provides mulching affect by shading more soil so less weeds grow once the plants start to mature and fill out.

 

A lot of folks deal with soil amendments, things like blue berries and potatoes you can amend the soil directly where they are, it is not stuff that needs to go throughout your garden.

 

Study your vegetables you like, figure out if they are bush type, partial vining, vining and figure out your sunlight generally. Minimum is 6 hours sunlight but I would go to minimum 8 for warm weather crops just to be safe or you wasted space as you won't get much produce, to begin with.

Figure out what they need, and feed the soil with things that are good for it and the plants.

Potatoes grow great in simple mulches, as well, and those felt like grow bags look great for many container type style garden efforts, which I was going to invest in some.

 

They talk about companion planting and bug, worm resistant flowers , but also consider plants that might help some ,but are the nemesis to others and sort it out. I found it out from a square foot gardening book on Kindle but I need to go locate the title for you.

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Look what I just found!!

 

http://www.reformationacres.com/2013/12/yearly-homestead-schedule.html

 

Thanks for the input Sass! We have 5 garden plots that total about 30,000 sq ft. This does not include the orchard, blueberry patch, blackberry patch, the grape and kiwi arbors, gooseberry patches and soon to be raspberry and strawberry patches. I am trying to come up with a schedule similar to the one linked to above but more applicable to us,. We don't have any livestock to worry about. We used to have bees but a big bear got them. I have several flower beds and borders in various stages of disrepair. We also have the usual piles of junk and spare lawn equipment for parts. My dream is to have it all organized (after we de-junk!) where we can find what we need and actually use it! And it looks better!

 

I also want to set up a pruning, organic spraying, planting, seed-sowing etc. schedule so everything gets done in a timely manner. I would like to have a schedule of when harmful and beneficial insects emerge here. This is something that requires taking notes every year for several years which I haven't done consistently. I know getting this together will be a tone of work and I wish I had done it years ago!!

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We have 5 garden plots that total about 30,000 sq ft. This does not include the orchard, blueberry patch, blackberry patch, the grape and kiwi arbors, gooseberry patches and soon to be raspberry and strawberry patches.

 

:sigh: I am SOOOOO envious, Daylily! But so much work. I can see why you need to be organized! That's big enough to warrant a full on business plan!

 

 

MtRider ....saved that link...in case I ever get my big garden, orchard, etc. :lois:

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Those are good websites Daylily. I bookmarked them.

 

The only thing I know from experience is to not plant everything at one time. You'll probably want to stagger it by a couple of weeks. If you plan on canning or freezing, you won't want it to all come in at the same time unless you have help or plan on giving some of it away. My potatoes, tomatoes and green beans came on at the same time and I had all I could do to get them all canned. Not a happy summer for me that year.

 

Also, my first garden, I planted my cucumbers in one day. I had a bumper crop for a couple of weeks and I couldn't hardly eat them all as they became too big and watery toward the end. Then I didn't have any for the rest of the summer. I can make a meal out of cukes, onion, tomato with Italian dressing...or I could have. Same thing with green onions. They all came up at once and then they were done. I should have planted rows every 1-2 weeks so I could have had some fresh veggies through the summer.

 

It also took longer for my bell peppers to turn red than I thought too. When you plan your garden be sure to check about how long it takes each variety to ripen. Some things you might want to come close together and some you might want to come later.

 

 

Edited: I forgot to mention I always heard marigolds were supposed to help repel pests because of their strong smell. Don't know how true that is though.

Edited by Jeepers
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Totally true, Jeepers. Marigolds have Pyrethrum..... Tho I'm not sure their smell has anything to do with that chemical. :shrug: Mebbe?

 

SNIP

 

 

PYRETHRUM Overview Information

Pyrethrum is a plant (Chrysanthemum cinerariifolium). Pyrethrum is also the name of the crude extract obtained from flowers of this plant.

Be careful not to confuse pyrethrum with pyrethrin. Pyrethrin refers to a more refined extract of pyrethrum. Pyrethrin is in body lice medicines such as A-200 Pyrinate, Barc, Lice-Enz, Licetrol, Pronto, R and C, RID, Tisit, Tisit Blue, and Triple X.

People apply pyrethrum directly to the skin as an insecticide, particularly for head lice, crab lice and their nits, and mites (scabies).

How does it work?

The active chemicals, the pyrethrins, are toxic to insect nervous systems.

 

<ENLARGE is mine>

 

 

Whole article: http://www.webmd.com/vitamins-supplements/ingredientmono-387-PYRETHRUM.aspx?activeIngredientId=387&activeIngredientName=PYRETHRUM

 

MtRider :lois:

Edited by Mt_Rider
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Jeepers, we learned that about cucumbers too...lol! Now we plant them about 3 weeks apart and do the same with zucchini and yellow summer squash. Just about the time the first ones are done, the second ones are starting to come in. This summer we never did get around to planting that second batch. That's why I want a planting calendar! We keep saying, "We need to plant those cucumbers!" but never did get it done. I want a calendar so I can look at it every week and say, "OK, this week we need to plant this and feed that and harvest this, etc."

 

Harvest dates are another thing I want to put on the calendar every summer. Say I plant some green beans and they are supposed to be ready in 70 days. I want to count 70 days forward on the calendar and write "harvest green beans" so I know to plan for it at least one day that week. Every summer we're like, "Oh no! The green beans are ready and I promised to do this and help with that and can't get them picked!" Then we're all in a panic because we're over-committed and we need those green beans! It makes for a very stressful life and a few simple things like writing down projected harvest dates would help so much. Yet we have never done it. Except DS and his different corn (meal, flour, popcorn, etc.). He's got that down pat.

 

Mt Rider, yes, it is a lot of work and we could make it so much easier by better planning and writing things down. We DO plan the gardens in January, DS makes maps and we write all that down...where everything will go. Then we inventory our seeds and order what we need for that year. We are saving most of our own seeds now but always need to order a few things. But then our organization breaks down when it comes to keeping notes on what happens when and insect emergence times. DS does write down when he top dresses anything, etc. He's more organized than the rest of us!

 

Thanks for the article on pyrethins and pyrethrum. Pyrethin gives me chemical bronchitis so i avoid it.

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I was trying to edit that post I made above with websites I had found on gardening and thought I lost the whole post.... but it lost the websites I had already added to the edit, weird.

Okay...... this is good, although some replies to questions are very dryly put.

 

http://www.almanac.com/vegetable-garden-planning-for-beginners

 

I just got online. I need to search my kindle library for the square foot gardening book that had lots more companion and ally plants and their enemies, including more for particular garden pests.

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Your garden sounded just like my first garden Daylily. All or nothing.

 

Having it all written down is the way "real" farmers and their wife do things. My aunt and uncle farmed for a living and I remember my aunt telling my grandma (her mother) about her garden and what was coming up next or what had to be done. She had her farm journal too. Uncles was more elaborate with costs and per acres and machinery etc. I remember an old time calculator sitting on his desk. My gosh, I'm going back over 50 years now.

 

One thing that might help you is to use a white board aka dry erase board. AFTER you have it in your computer and printed out. You can get all sizes now and even ones that have the months of a year already printed on them. I have a couple of the smaller ones (about 11x14) and they really help me a lot. They keep me focused on what I want to accomplish in a month or week or during summer or over the winter. I can just smudge off what gets accomplished or add something to it. A big plus is it's visible and staring at me...all the time. Out of sight out of mind is an issue with me plus I really need lists to help remember things.

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Sass, very good gardening information for beginning gardeners. I have the Square Foot Garden book too! DD1 uses that for her raised bed gardens. She grows an amazing amount of food in a pretty small space.

 

Jeepers, I like the whiteboard idea. I really need lists to remember things too. I will explore the whiteboard concept. :) DD2 has often told me, "If I knew just what needed to be done, I could do it when I have a few free minutes". I can spend so much time just ambling around wondering what I should do until my time to do it is used up!

 

You are right about "real" farmers keeping good records. We definitely need to do better because I'm getting too old for everything to be ready to harvest at the same time LOL! I was impressed with the Reformation Acres sight because of the records they kept. For the past few years, we have been recording the food we put up, which is nice to have too.

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Look what I just found!!

 

http://www.reformationacres.com/2013/12/yearly-homestead-schedule.html

 

Thanks for the input Sass! We have 5 garden plots that total about 30,000 sq ft. This does not include the orchard, blueberry patch, blackberry patch, the grape and kiwi arbors, gooseberry patches and soon to be raspberry and strawberry patches. I am trying to come up with a schedule similar to the one linked to above but more applicable to us,. We don't have any livestock to worry about. We used to have bees but a big bear got them. I have several flower beds and borders in various stages of disrepair. We also have the usual piles of junk and spare lawn equipment for parts. My dream is to have it all organized (after we de-junk!) where we can find what we need and actually use it! And it looks better!

 

I also want to set up a pruning, organic spraying, planting, seed-sowing etc. schedule so everything gets done in a timely manner. I would like to have a schedule of when harmful and beneficial insects emerge here. This is something that requires taking notes every year for several years which I haven't done consistently. I know getting this together will be a tone of work and I wish I had done it years ago!!

:0327:

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