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Prepping for the “Golden Years”

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The only other thing I can think of at this time, is, I always ask the cashiers to bag my stuff lightly, and if I have heavy stuff, I ask for assistance. There’s no vanity here, when it comes to having someone else do what I can’t. 

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I've had to ask for help at the hardware type stores plenty of times. I've always found them more than happy to help. Especially those young stock boys. They can hoss stuff around and not think anything about it.

 

I really need to get over not asking for help more often though. I'm not embarrassed to ask but if I get help then I think I'm perceived as lazy. I hate that. I think it's a carry over from my growing up days when I heard the family talking about so-and-so being lazy. Sigh. And all of the women in my family took such pride in the care of their house and yard. Except for one aunt. She was the "lazy" one. Bless her heart.

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I keep telling my parents:  If you forget to tell them to bag stuff lightly, carry extra bags in your truck and redo it before carrying them up your stairs to kitchen from garage!  They buy a lot of liquids....milk, tiny soda cans, juice, etc.  Those are HEAVY!!  And we surely all have plenty of extra grocery bags....

 

As for that "lazy...good-for-nothin'" label inside our heads......  :sassing:   It's in the genetic code of all the German-ancestry folk in the community I grew up with.   Er, well...95% of them!   It was EVER SO HARD for me to become disabled young... [sit - around - not - working - doing - nothin' - wantin' - to - have - my - life  - back - and - still - BE - SOMEBODY!!!]                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 'Course by the time I've reached the "older" category...pffft, piece of cake.  Already BTDT and have the tangled thots/emotions straightened out.  Illegitimate/illogical thot patterns have been shown the door.  [ahem, ...mostly]   I certainly DO understand that train of thot but please begin to recognize what it is....illegitimate.  Oh, it DOES legitimately fit some folks.  Seems like too many folks in this era.  But here's my rule that I've shared with many other disabled folks:  

 

If you're worried that maybe you're just bein' LAZY......You.  Are.  Not.   Cuz truly LAZY folks certainly don't worry about it.  Right?

 

And as for what others may think......  :shrug:  Not sure most would notice or care. 

 

  :dusting:    :dishes:    :shopping:   :clothesline:      :canning:    :lois:    :cook:   

 

MtRider  ....got way more folks around here guilty of 'OVERWORKING' than 'lazy' on this board, for sure  :grouphug:  

 

 

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On 5/18/2018 at 3:37 PM, Mt_Rider said:

....chucks pads....waterproof bed protectors  [also for anyone who's sick]

 

To be "thrifty," buy puppy training pads from discount/dollar stores. :lol:

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On 5/19/2018 at 8:21 AM, Deb2of9 said:

my younger daughter. She doesn't drive,

You need to teach her HOW. Getting a license isn't really necessary, but she really needs to know how to drive in case of an emergency!  :wacko:

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14 hours ago, Jeepers said:

A little wagon would be cute but it would be harder to manage the steps and it would take up more room for storage.

 

Who said you have to bring the wagon to the groceries instead of taking the groceries to the wagon.  :misc-smiley-231:  

Keep the wagon at the top of the steps and make short trips up with the grocery bags and load it. Once all your groceries are in it, THEN take it inside. :P

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Hee-hee. I meant storing the wagon when not in use would take up more storage area than one of those carts.

 

I've seen those two wheel carts with triangle wheels meant for going up steps. That would be nice if you just have to go up a couple of steps from garage to house or front door to house.

 

I Googled. They are calling them utility carts. I figured 'grocery cart' was the wrong description. Sigh.

 

Looks like you can use this one as a dolly too.

 

Wheels.png

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That one looks sturdy, Jeepers.   I don't have any of the triangular wheeled ones...yet...  ;)

But I have a large one with good basket capacity and larger wheels.  It rides in my truck.  Purpose:  If I ever have to EVAC and then have to walk....it carries E-stuff from truck.  Have had tooooo many close calls with wildfire EVAC. 

 

I also have 2 of the small, versatile two-wheel dolly things.  I use for moving stuff around the garage.  VERY helpful. 

 

I have a tiny dolly too....have my town Just/in/Case bag on that.  In lieu of a rolling backpack. 

 

None of them do our stairs well, but it would help with getting home....or evac. 

 

MtRider  :shopping: 

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I saw that one on the Sears web site. I have a little dolly that folds flat. It wouldn't carry very much though. Maybe about 4 cases of water or a couple of full trash bags to the curb.

 

 

I needed some big garbage bags awhile back. I bought some of those contractor bags. Wow, those things are huge. I had no idea. No way could I fill them even 1/3 way full and lift them. Not sure what I was thinking. Those things are nearly 5 foot long.

 

But they made really good covers for 5 gallon buckets. Put 2 side by side and stack them 3-4 buckets high and they are perfect. They keep the light out and dust off of the buckets. They also hide them!  I wouldn't have bought them for that but since I already had them, I use them to cover (hide) my buckets.

 

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I tried covering a stack of buckets in the basement/garage with black trash bags ....keep dust off.  Unfortunately the mice decided it was a cozy place to hide, chew, poo....  :motz_6:  So now I'm trying to figure out a different method of dust covers.  Maybe taped down so they can't get up underneath? 

 

MtRider :pc_coffee: 

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I can no longer lift most 5 gallon buckets once they are packed, much less the six-gallon ones.  So that leaves the 2-3 gallon size for home packing, or the cases of 1-gallon cans for bought.  Cycling through has changed drastically.

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I can't hardly lift them either. Especially since they are in the basement.

 

I'm changing out most of my 5 gal. buckets to 4 gal. square ones a little at a time. I found some on sale a couple of years ago. I like the size and square ones stack nicely using less room. I also got some 2 gal. square ones that I just love! They are a perfect size for prepping for one or dividing up a bigger bucket like rice or beans. I can lift a 2 gal. bucket full of rice with no problem if I need to.

 

Being square means you can't use those screw on/off lids (can't think of the name of them :gaah: ) but the lids are hinged. 

 

 

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Moving buckets and such is one of my main uses for the small 2-wheel dolly.  The buckets snug right up ....rounded part fitting between the two vertical supports and off I go.  'Course getting them from Circus Tent to back of garage area means bumping over the metal bar on the bottom of dog-kennel door.  Across a short distance of Colorado dirt/grit....  AND over the small plastic pipe that drains the whatever-fluid from the furnace.  [Happens to be right in the way.  I put a flattened cardboard box over pipe to kind 'ramp' it...]  But the garage floor is smooth concrete so it zings along well there.  I am [usually...still nursing this danged back strain right now...]  able to do single HOIST motions.  ...then rest a minute.   I think the "UN-HOIST" motion is more difficult.....trying to take the third bucket down from a stack.  You kinda have to unhook them cuz they 'seat' together.  And I'm short!

 

3 buckets is as high as I stack the heavy ones.  But I have a lot of things in buckets so they're MUCH lighter and I stack 2 more light ones....up to 5 high.  3 high with the super-pails is a little iffy.....so I put super pails on the bottom and can switch over to 5 gal or less for the 3rd one.  Uniformity is not strong in my stash. I have all sizes.  I loaded many of the odd shaped buckets myself....whatever I could get from restaurants/bakeries/etc.  Still have a source of square ..2? gallon ones.  But they're not sealed well.  Duct tape helps but....  :shrug:  I like the rubber gasket!

 

I've been collecting 'user-friendly' equipment for more than 2 decades from Thrift Stores and garage sales.  Now that I really don't get out much....I'm glad I got the stuff like the small dollies when I did. 

 

MtRider  :pc_coffee:

Edited by Mt_Rider
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I stored my buckets in the basement when I was younger and healthier. Now they are a burden. Getting them up 13 wooden steps is not going to be easy. Nearly all of my preps are stored down there. Nice and cool and dark but pretty inaccessible most of the time.

 

At the time I got my buckets they were done as a group sale so I got a better deal on them. They no longer feature it. Wish I had gotten more.

 

Here are a couple of links I found:

 

6 pack sets for $36.00

https://www.bayteccontainers.com/2-gal--square-ez-stor-pail-w-handle.html#gsc.tab=0

 

All different sizes sold without lids

https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=124444&catid=818

 

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On 5/29/2018 at 11:58 AM, Jeepers said:

I stored my buckets in the basement when I was younger and healthier. Now they are a burden. Getting them up 13 wooden steps is not going to be easy. Nearly all of my preps are stored down there. Nice and cool and dark but pretty inaccessible most of the time.

 

At the time I got my buckets they were done as a group sale so I got a better deal on them. They no longer feature it. Wish I had gotten more.

 

Here are a couple of links I found:

 

6 pack sets for $36.00

https://www.bayteccontainers.com/2-gal--square-ez-stor-pail-w-handle.html#gsc.tab=0

 

All different sizes sold without lids

https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=124444&catid=818

 

 

Several years ago we were able to buy several of those square buckets from our local WM bakery.  A;bby-girl even has one for her very own doggie food! LOL

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On 5/29/2018 at 11:58 AM, Jeepers said:

I stored my buckets in the basement when I was younger and healthier. Now they are a burden. Getting them up 13 wooden steps is not going to be easy. Nearly all of my preps are stored down there. Nice and cool and dark but pretty inaccessible most of the time.

 

At the time I got my buckets they were done as a group sale so I got a better deal on them. They no longer feature it. Wish I had gotten more.

 

Here are a couple of links I found:

 

6 pack sets for $36.00

https://www.bayteccontainers.com/2-gal--square-ez-stor-pail-w-handle.html#gsc.tab=0

 

All different sizes sold without lids

https://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.aspx?itemid=124444&catid=818

 

When we started arranging things at the homestead house, we turned one of the bedrooms into a pantry because it's just off the kitchen area.  No steps!  We had previously thought we'd put the pantry in the upstairs bedroom...NOT!  A few trips up those steep steps to turn the kitchen into my new spice/herb/essential oil room made me change my mind real quick!

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I'll probably end up using a spare bedroom for a pantry too. I keep the house about the same temperature year around anyway. I'll just cover over the windows. My upstairs is very hot in the summer unless I crank up the air. A whole house attic fan is a beautiful thing for cooling down the house fast but it also brings in the humidity.

 

One story houses are hard to find where I want to go. They are way more expensive too. I read an article the other day about it getting worse as all of we baby boomers are trying to scale down and avoid as many stairs as possible. I believe it.

 

Ranches in....McMansions out.

I do like tri-levels though.

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Yeah...and don't put the one-level on TOP of the garage like this one is....

 

MtRider :(

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Good post and Grrrrreat ideas!!. 

1.  I have a folding commode in my preps (well, somewhere around, since I moved, LOL). 

2.  I never got rid of DH's' wheelchair (it folds, too).

3.   I buy canes at the thrift shop whenever I see them, and they are all over the place because I, too, keep leaving my cane 'somewhere' around the house. 

4.  I kept my walker - I keep it in the car because there is nothing so nice when you are shopping, touristing, checking the 'flea markets' that are all over the area, or fishing, as having a chair at hand.  The little pouch carrier on the bottom has a handy zip pocket, too.  For fishing it is 'da bomb' - it carries all my gear, my poles, helps me navigate, AND I can sit on it instead of on the ground. 

5.  I am "allowed" replacement parts for my apap every 3 months - I get them even if the old parts are still OK, and set them aside for emergency use.  Since (apparently) CPAPA and the like are no longer made with a 6-volt DC plug, I also picked up a converter, so I can run it off a car battery or the generator.  (Sleeping is kinda critical, ya know?)  A converter is cheap, so are trickle chargers; the deep cycle battery costed some, but I have two, so I can charge one and use the other.  Yes, I have a way to charge them off the genny.

6.  Speaking of 6V appliances, check with a semi-truckers catalog - you can get everything from coffeemakers and crockpots, to pizza ovens and electric fry pans and electric blankets all made to work off 6V DC power.  So my batteries will be very useful in terms of comfort items.  PS, get a small dolly for the batteries, they are far easier to roll than lift!

7.  Get the book by Hesperian Press on 'helping disabled village children' it has many excellent ideas, plans and tools for coping with disabilities without a power grid and for little outlay.  Another book if you can find it (It was at my library) is "Aids to Make You Able" written in England.  It has creative and DIY changes to help with disabled living.  Work smarter, not harder!

8.  I am starting to prep more and more dehydrated items - easier and lighter - saving the canning for things I do not like dehydrated.  I can in pints primarily now. And I bought an aluminum pressure canner to use instead of the heavier stainless steel one.  A HUGE improvement.

9.  I discovered I can fit quite a mini-bob inside an aluminum cane!  Darn near all the comforts of home, LOL.

 

Aside from those things, here are some things I changed in the house as I got closer to retirement - 

1.  When the toilet needed replacing I got the ADA version - higher & easier to get on and off  Plus I put in some handrails (you can get free-standing ones, too). 

2.  'Replaced shower heads with hand-held sprayers (the massage is a nice plus) and put a plastic chair from the thrift shop ($5) in the tub.  

3.  Hard flooring trumps carpet.  Although carpet supposedly provides better footing as it does not get slippery, it is easier to clean hard floors, and if you have or develop allergies the hard floors do not hold mold and other allergens in them.  I prefer to use area rugs (washable) in places I feel I NEED one - a nonskid one by the tub and the bed, for example.  

4.  Kitchen appliances are still non-electric whenever possible, but mechanical ones with larger handles are nice.  

5.  Chairs WITH ARMRESTS are easier to lever yourself into and out of.  Foot-rests & ottomans are easier than a recliner to operate, and provide extra seating and a place (underneath the upholstery) to hide a weapon for kick-it-over-and-draw applications (home invasions are becoming increasingly common in many areas).  Plus it is easier to get up from a chair than the recliner in a hurry.  

6.  Anything designed for arthritics or other disabilities I find at the thrift shops is automatically considered.  I found a 'dressing stick' and it has been sooooo handy, not for dressing, but for mounting Christmas lights in high places (LOL).  Medicine dividers are given out free by many drugstores in my area for advertising.  The fancy 'sock puller-onner' they sold me when I got my hip replaced does not work as well as that simple dressing stick.  

7.  Canes with crook handles versus the pistol grip are easier to hold for me, and work nicely to hook items off the higher shelves at Wal-mart.  You will expire before the items on the shelf does if you have to wait for a clerk.  They also hang off doorknobs and wall hooks much more securely for keeping them handy.

8.  Smaller sized pots & pans, crockpots, etc are lighter and easier to handle; melamine dishes for arthritic hands are lighter and less breakable if they slip.  Many are donated to thrift stores because they are 'too small' for family use, but they are just right for one or two people. 

9.  I have a stool in the kitchen that I cut down to a comfortable size (I hate legs hanging down, I want my feet on the floor) that is excellent in the kitchen.  I can sit and cook, wash dishes, etc; and I have a lap-size cutting board to ease food preparation. 

10.  SHARP knives are easier to use - I have a sharpener that rolls back and forth to keep things sharp.  

11.  I store my storage foods in smaller pails now - the hardware store has 2 gallon ones that are made the same as the 5 gal ones, and they are less heavy to handle.  

12.  I research and try to incorporate older non-electric techniques for making physical work easier - mechanical engineering has largely been replace by electrical engineering, leaving one helpless if one loses power.  (Not me, though....heh-heh-heh!)  Fly swatters are easier on those with breathing problems than bug sprays.  Yu can make a fly or wasp trap from a 2 liter bottle that wont result in poisoned air.  

13.  Yes the Amish have excellent dryers.  My favorites were the wall mounted one that folded out like an accordion into the room when needed; and the one that was hung from the ceiling that was lowered by pulleys when wanted (I'd need higher ceilings though for that one).  I look for Amish items for prepping whenever possible.

 

I could go on and on but this is getting pretty long 

Edited by kappydell
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Love your post Kappy. Always good to have some new thoughts to consider. I hadn't heard of the two books mentioned but I will definitely go searching for them. I'm sure there are a ton of devices out there I'm unaware of.

 

I plan to make a Lehmans haul before I leave this area. It's an easy day trip now but an exhausting one, maybe even an over nighter, when I move. Plus hit all of the bulk food stores they have there. I should start a running list now!

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On ‎5‎/‎19‎/‎2018 at 5:05 PM, Jeepers said:

 

I massage my feet often. I'm not sure about (what's the word for pressure points? Not acupressure or reiki...sigh) but it sure feels good.

 

*SNIP*

 

Twenty-two days later....reflexology. The word is reflexology. I didn't remember it. I just saw it online. I don't even remember the context now. But the word is reflexology.   :banghead:

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Howdy all. I haven’t stopped by in quite awhile. This is a good thread for our age, so it got my attention. I have read all your contributions with interest.

 

My prepping has definitely changed. If my health holds out I expect to retire in a decade. DH is older than me and will likely retire sooner. We no longer do some of the things we used to do, and this has affected prepping.

 

Like other have said, bugging in is our focus. It was always our main focus. But realistically now, bugging out would likely not go well for us.

 

We bought a homestead with a little more land but a one story house and half the square footage of the old place. My old knee injury appreciates no stairs! It is easier to keep it up, to heat, to cool, etc. It should be a good home to age in place.

 

We are down to one horse. DH’s health doesn’t allow him to ride. Thus the idea of bugging out on horseback in the event roads are impassable or cars won’t run is no longer remotely possible. We are staying here absent the most dire necessity. Then we will head for relatives. We are prepping for the possibility of kids and grandkids bugging out to our place also. 

 

I have begun building raised beds for the garden. I do not try to grow our own grains any longer. Raised beds are easier on me now.

 

I planted dwarf fruit trees here. Easier to maintain from the ground - I don’t want to have to climb ladders. We have LOTS of fruit growing here, over a long season of production.

 

We have focused on bugging in, so we have done some things to harden our place. It is completely fenced. The fencing is covered with thorns - climbing roses that produce hips, raspberries, hawthorns, etc. Inside the fence are our dogs (BIG). Our place is not an inviting target.

 

We have set up water cachement just in case we are not able to get our well water. 

 

Still raise chickens. Grow some of their feed. Ferment their purchased feed (thrifty -makes it healthier and you feed less, so there is less to store (or what is stored will last longer).

 

As others have mentioned, we stock up on medications. We also picked up some handicapped aid items at auction - bathtub transfer bench, walker, canes, wheelchair, etc. just in case.

 

Still store food, of course. And the food stored has not changed much, except I mostly store organic now.

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