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mommato3boys

Disappointed in Commerical Emergency Packed Foods.

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So we are finally back to a point where I can restock our used storage food and I though while I was making my list I would look at some of the 72 hour buckets for the kids. Well in my opinion they suck. You get a 3 day supply of food in one bag so you have to guess how much it takes to feed you for the day. Heaven forbid that you fix the whole bag because you have no way to keep it until it is time to eat it again. Yes I know it will cost more to package one meal per package but I am looking at it from a sheeple point of view. Here you crossed over and bought a bucket and you think alright my family will have food but you have no clue how to fix it so you prepare the whole bag. Now you have cooked 3 days worth of food and have no way to store it. Geeze think of the food poisoning. So I have scratched the buckets off my list for the kids. Yes they would know how to fix them but really milk shakes for the first 24 hours then Spanish rice the next two day for lunch and chicken noodle soup for dinner. I will just buy them backpacking boxes from Harmony House and be done with it. At least they will have a variety.

 

Also we are talking about the lack of variety on another thread but I think I seeing changes in the storage food arena also...how about you are you seeing changes?

Edited by mommato3boys
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Yes.  Quality is down, prices are up.  Too much sugar & salt. Selection is limited to what they want to sell, not what I want to purchase (I hate freeze dried, for example, it takes up too much space for too little product.  And TVP?  I have to avoid soy.  So that is out, too.)

 

It was well worth getting a dehydrator, and googling the backpacking  sites to find out how to dry down my own recipes.  Dehydrated home made chili is amazing!  Pre cooked rice turns into home-made "Minuit Rice" and is seasoned to suit my taste buds.  And cooked beans can be dehydrated so they take less than 30 min to prepare.  To be honest, I prefer my home dehydrated foods to anything that I can buy.  The dehydrate2store.com site has terrific instructions and recipes.  I can my meats, usually in the autumn when the farmers harvest their chickens & hogs to they don't have to overwinter large flocks/herds.    I only purchase a few things commercially, like cheese powder, or dried eggs, that I do not want to do at home.

 

Harmony House is one of my favorite places for dehydrated stuff that I do buy.  Their variety is wonderful.  

Barry Farms (www.barryfarm.com) has a good supply of bulk dried goods, with lots of unusual specialties, well priced, but not packed for long storage.  (I repack in jars with oxy absorbers).  I like their cheese powders, colored lentils & rices, and vegetables for selection as well.  And if you need xanthan gum or citric or ascorbic acid, well, they have those, too.

Edited by kappydell
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Kappy said everything I was thinking. I like my own dehydrated foods too. You can seal the portion size you want in a Food Saver bag or cut down some Mylar bags to the size you want. Or do both. I like Harmony House. I've ordered quite a lot of stuff from them over the past years and have never been disappointed. I do repackage it into glass canning jars though. I buy cheese powder and egg crystals too. And some powdered sour cream. I put the meals in jars in bags though. They take up less room.

 

Google "Meals in a jar" and a lot of sites will come up. Here is an example of just one:

https://momwithaprep.com/101-meals-in-a-jar-recipes/

 

Chef Tess is good at meals in a jar too. Remember you don't have to use their products.

http://cheftessbakeresse.blogspot.com/p/52-method-recipe.html

 

Youtube has some good ideas also. And maybe Pinterest.

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Good idea TheCG. I have her book but soon after it came out, all of her recipes appeared on her website. :rolleyes:

 

I haven't tried any of them but they sound good. An old Youtuber (Perbain) has some of the meals in a jar too. 

 

Someone has a recipe for Olive Garden's Zuppa Toscana...like. It might be Tess. I don't remember.  Dried sausage, potatoes, onion, kale etc. in a cream base. 

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Glad to know I am not the only one frustrated by all of this and have found ways around the "commercial" processed stuff. I do love Chef Tess' recipes. I have used some of hers when we have gone camping. Thanks so much for the link. I will definitely look her up.

Edited by mommato3boys
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If one studies the caloric count in most of those buckets, they'll sadly find that they will not sustain a person with the necessary calories needed in a real emergency.  Make up your own buckets with food you'll eat.  We bought bulk bags of individual peanut bags when one of our mennonite stores had them.  Also small cans of chili with beans, foil wrapped crackers, cheese crackers, small packs of kool aid with sugar, a bottle of water, instant oat meal packetts, a package of instant milk, chewing gum, toothpaste and toothbrush, hair brush, extra pair of readers, individual bags of potato chips or fritos, bandaides and bandages, anticeptic ointment, anti-itch cream, anti-dirhreah meds, travel sickness pills, fish meds, baby wipes, hand wipes, toilet paper, aspirin, ibuprofen, allergy tabs, and lots of other things we'd want, like mustard, ketchup, relish and salsa...available when you eat at McD's or Taco Bell.  A 5 gallon bucket for each of us...grab and go stuff if we absolutely had to leave our homestead for a week.

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30 minutes ago, The WE2's said:

If one studies the caloric count in most of those buckets, they'll sadly find that they will not sustain a person with the necessary calories needed in a real emergency. 

 

Definitely, WE2.  I'd have to double the "serving size"  ....even if it included sides.  DH...if he was working hard, as everyone would be doing in a Post-Hooey.....would have to X4.  If your emergency consists of sitting in your car on a mild day till they can tow it, fine.  Otherwise, take a good second look at the actual calories, protein, and nutrition.  Not weight or "servings".

 

That's a tip that CGA gave us all years ago.  I spent a few months comparing ALL the data.  Commercially packaged stuff has it's uses.  Having beef stew MRE's with self-heaters in the car is good for such vehicle emergencies, especially in winter.  But we couldn't carry more than a couple.  That's what the Ebars are for. 

 

One issue is that "LIFEBOAT RATIONS" were designed to keep folks alive as they floated on the water at sea.  The caloric counts are different if you're being more active in an emergency.

 

.....and someone tell me why Mr.Quote Box suddenly appeared below my typing?  :scratchhead: 

MtRider  :cook:  

 

Quote

 

 

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1 hour ago, The WE2's said:

If one studies the caloric count in most of those buckets, they'll sadly find that they will not sustain a person with the necessary calories needed in a real emergency.  

 

I have no desire to buy them. I was just thinking this would kick start the kids into prepping but your are correct. The calories are only like 1600, that is what I am eating to loose weight, worse yet they are not really high in protein. I am sorry if you are working hard yes you need the carbs but you also need the protein to carry you further. You will burn through those carbs fast doing manual labor.

 

We have a tote with our supply of food and a case of water to go along with it. I have bought the packages of tuna and salmon. There are peanut butter crackers, dried fruit, shelf stable milk that will change out every three months (even through it has a longer shelf life) and to hubby's surprise cereal. We have a box of breakfast bars, protein bars, jerky, trail mix and drink mix. I did splurge and buy two MREs each and put in there but I was picky and asked our military son's which ones were best and bought those. There are also two camping meals that I have made and put in Mylar bags. All we have to do is add hot water and then eat it. I have a little kettle in there along with a metal coffee can that has sterno in so we can heat water. There are plastic ware in there a well as a roll of paper towels. This is just for 72 hours. We have two back packs also that have all of personal items in it along with a sleeping bag and sleeping pad in case we have to sleep on the ground of the floor.

 

 

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That's great Mommato3boys. A multi vitamin might not be a bad idea too.

 

BTW, every time I see your username I see "tomato".  :D

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:scratchhead:  I've always done that too, Jeepers.  Weird ...cuz it's backwards, kinda. 

 

MtRider  :rolleyes: 

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On 7/14/2019 at 10:46 AM, Jeepers said:

Good idea TheCG. I have her book but soon after it came out, all of her recipes appeared on her website. :rolleyes:

 

I haven't tried any of them but they sound good. An old Youtuber (Perbain) has some of the meals in a jar too. 

 

Someone has a recipe for Olive Garden's Zuppa Toscana...like. It might be Tess. I don't remember.  Dried sausage, potatoes, onion, kale etc. in a cream base. 

 

This one? 

 

SAUSAGE ZUPPA TOSCANA

1  c instant Pinto beans                                                                      2 ½ c dry potato chunks

1 c freeze dry sausage                                                                         ¼ c freeze dry onions

½ c sour cream powder                                                                      1 TB chicken bouillon

½ tsp crushed red pepper                                                                  ½ tsp freeze dried garlic

½ c freeze dried chopped spinach

Add to 8 c water in crock pot.  Cook on low 4 hrs.  serve with grated parmesan & breadcrumbs

 

I just ran across it last night & it looked yummy.  I'm collecting all the dehydrated food recipes I have collected into one place, and I saw this one on pinterest.....

Would the freeze dry sausage store longer term than DIY dehydrated sausage crumbles?  Usually fat is a limiting factor.  Nonetheless, this looks good.

 

I'm also putting in some of my go-to recipes, like my mothers' master baking mix.  She said aluminum in baking powders tasted bitter, so she never liked Bisquick or any commercial mixes.  It dates from the late 1940's and comes with recipes for twenty two items, plus variations, that you can make with it...far more than I find nowdays.  PLUS it has directions for using different kinds of fat (lard, oil, shortening) which makes it more versatile.  

I'm thinking it would make a good addition to our collection of Mrs S recipes?  Is our survival cookbook still around?

Edited by kappydell
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3 hours ago, kappydell said:

 

I'm thinking it would make a good addition to our collection of Mrs S recipes?  Is our survival cookbook still around?

 

I was trying to work on it.  Got overwhelmed, looking in ancient threads, remembering people, long gone, distracted, and such.  Duplicates, trying to make sure I gave credit to those who posted the recipes, then, no one seemed interested and I put it aside.  It’s still on my computer......  sigh...

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Guest Anosepressedtotheglass

Remember the rule of three. 

 

Three days of "normal" food you can open and eat, like the Pop Tarts and cans of Chef BoyarDee I used to pack for my kids when hurricane season loomed, or the MREs the late DX loved, or the retorts of Indian food I still squirrel away.  This would include convenience food in your freezer because--face it--that stuff isn't going bad the instant the electricity goes out.  College kids have three days of food, even if it's a package of hot dogs, a couple of frozen burritos, a box of cold cereal, a helmet full stale popcorn, a jar of peanut butter, and half a loaf of bread. It has to be known food.  It also has to be food that they have to be able to eat it with zero preparation, straight from the can if need be, and that it has calories.  But for this thread, focus on the fact it's known.  You know how many calories your ordinary lazy-times food has in it.  You know how long it will last you if you are lounging on the sofa, if you are puttering about inside, and if you are sweating buckets outside.  (The challenge can be keeping it on hand.  I used to have to padlock the chest I kept hurricane food in, or the guys would start sneaking treats out of it the minute I turned my back.)  By the way, add in three days of drinks.  Your normal fluid intake, rounded up, plus twice that much water.  Shelf stable whole milk is a lot cheaper and tastier than it used to be.

 

Once you have three days in hand, identified and if necessary locked down, then think of three weeks of processed ingredients.  Biscuit mix, whether bought or home made.  Peanut butter.  Jelly.  Crackers (which stay good longer than bread).  Salad dressing.  Condiments.  Cut up, measured, and sometimes cooked vegetables, starches, meats, sauces.  Here are your soups, your spaghetti sauces.  To make instant or hurricane food, you'd need to pre-cook your pasta and dehydrate it so it would rehydrate very quickly with a minimum of water.  If this were for say a potential layoff, you might want to leave the pasta packaged because your family might find it more acceptable in that form.  Three weeks of processed food costs more than three days of junk food, and takes up a lot more room to store.  You still need it.  For the three days, focus very hard on the ingredients of known food, simple food, comfort food.  Food your kids will eat.  Food you know you can digest well.  Food you know how long will last you while puttering about, while hiding from zombies, while sweating buckets cleaning up behind the storm.  And keep it simple.  But then most comfort food is simple.

 

Once you have that in hand, look at three months of very basic ingredients.  Wheat berries.  Flour.  Corn.  Barley.  Oats.  Raisins.  Baking soda.  Powdered milk.  Instant potatoes.  Rice.  Beans/peas.  Salt.  Sugar.  Cocoa powder.  Pasta.  Coconut oil.  Seeds to plant.  The oil, if it's not the super-expensive coconut oil, needs to go in the deep freeze, if you have one, or the back of the fridge, because it will go rancid waiting for you rotate through it.  By the way, if you are looking at that list and thinking of unhealthy diets, you are exactly right.  Guaranteed to pack the weight on your tummy and hips in normal times.  You are not packing buckets or totes of these ingredients for normal times.  

 

Once you have three and three and three, sit back and look things over.  Maybe talk to your spouse, or maybe not.  Decide where you need to expand.  Living here in Florida, I have two weeks of the three-day level by the fourth of July every summer.  Hurricane weather usually starts in August.  Usually.

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9 minutes ago, Guest Anosepressedtotheglass said:

It's Ambergris.

You rock Lady!

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55 minutes ago, Guest Anosepressedtotheglass said:

https://www.backpackingchef.com/food-dehydrator-recipes.html   This gentleman's recipes have come very highly recommended.

 

I actually purchased his e-book a while back, when I was considering actually backpacking at some point (I still am, that point might just be further off than I'd like...).

 

I'll have to see if I can find it again.  I remember thinking it definitely sounded like it was worth purchasing!

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We backpacked for years. Most of our emergency supplies are backpacked ready.  Except, IDK if I’d go far with a pack on. :ph34r: 

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On 7/14/2019 at 10:42 PM, Jeepers said:

That's great Mommato3boys. A multi vitamin might not be a bad idea too.

 

BTW, every time I see your username I see "tomato".  :D

 

I was thinking more along the lines of fiber. You know change of diet does horrible things to you. May even need to pack some Imodium 

 

Tomatoes! I love tomatoes. LOL

 

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All of the tender tummy + G.I. tract meds would be good.  NOT the time to be wanting something to STOP.....or START! 

 

So....until Ambergris gets her computer fixed.....she gets to wear a different mask every time she pops on.  :lol: 

 

MtRider  ....but she can't get into Fireside to continue her story.  :( 

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Annarchy, thank you for preserving the Mrs S cookbook.  Cant we just put it together with an apology and disclaimer that many of these are from old posts, and we cannot identify many of the original posters contributors.  As far as dupes, just keep one with a notation that several contributors sent in duplicates and we are grateful for their time and effort to contribute.  If they are near-dupes listing them as "variations" under the main recipe, and giving credit?  

 

I sure see where it could be overwhelming.  Need help? 

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Good posts Ambergris. There is no "like button" for guests so ----------> :thumbs:

 

Thanks for the recipe Kappy. Olive Gardens Zuppa Toscana is to die for. It is so good. They have chunks of Italian sausage, pieces of real potato...some with the skin still on and great big pieces of kale. I've heard the real stuff has some bacon in it but I've never seen any. Maybe some drippings?  Lawsy.

 

You could make it with smoked sausage/kielbasa and freeze it. I've never heard of dehydrated smoked sausage but (Iroquois always be good).

 

Crimony. That's supposed to say "I'll bet it would be good". Kindle auto correct is killing me. :angry:

 

Edited by Jeepers
Kindle Again
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LOL.  I try to turn it off every chance I get.  It can't spell for squat and is about as accurate as closed captioning on U-Tube!

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