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Article: crisis garden...enough?

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I like it!  If I hung the buckets from a high tree.....would THAT keep the voles and pasture varmints out????

 

MtRider   :rolleyes: 

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I am going to talk to SIL about building me something like that stand to put buckets in. Only thing is when my daughter sees it she will have him building her one to.    We do plant lettuce and cucs. as well as the other things I mentioned. When SIL comes to help me with the raised beds, I am going to try to start planting some new things around here. I had the mop top bushes that took up the flower beds all the way across the front of my house taken out. So I am going to work on that and plant some things. it is in the front of house but who cares. It's food. Maybe plant lettuce, cherry tomatoes, herbs and not sure what else yet. But will get it figured out. Just glad those mop top bushes are gone. 

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Posted (edited)

I think the topic speaks for itself.  Crisis Garden.  I had not read all the way back to page one on here.  But I am thinking after reading the first page and moving on through,  Our gardens may just become a crisis garden if things don't improve within the next 2 months. But thinking we are going to have a world wide famine on the horizon.  So I am going to push myself to the limit to keep up house work and garden. Also thinking I am going to hit some of the farm markets. We don't have the room to plant things like corn to get enough out of it to freeze or can. So will be buying a couple of bushels of corn this year. Might dehydrate some to see how it turns out. Normally we don't do a winter garden but we used to do it years ago.  So I am going back to doing a winter garden this fall. 

My granddaughter in CA said she has been pickling every type of veggie she can get her hands on. Not sure what she is pickling other that cucs, beets and okra. But sounds like she is pickling a  lot of stuff. I think I would get tired of pickled veggies after a while. My granddaughter in Washington State is forgetting she has to unpack from the move and outside watching the back yard for the best sunlight for a garden. She has already started her plans.  Glad they are both thinking ahead and trying to get food stored. And a garden. 

 

Go back to the very first post and click on the article.  Thinking this also will be a good reason for rain barrels as I know some of you have. I need to get that done.  Though we do have a well. But have to get it hooked back up again as we had to disconnect it and move it for the driveway. Not hard to do. Just have to get out there and do it.

Edited by Littlesister
Read article in first post.
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29 minutes ago, Littlesister said:

rain barrels

 

These are already in place, but have two more free standing that need to go "someplace".  Right now they are hiding hubby's cement mixer beside the exterior cellar door.

101_1036 Rain barrel east side.jpg

Rain Barrels Done.jpg

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I absolutely love your rain barrel set up! It's a thing of beauty. 

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We'll be doing our raised beds, hanging buckets,  and containers again this year.  (these are previous garden pics) We'll row plant Okra and Pole Beans though. And of course, some flowers for my pollinators...especially my beloved Mason Bees (they love their little houses) and our blackberries and raspberries.  Even found a pic of me planting my Egyptian Walking Onions around the ornamental windmill.

 

SQFG3.jpg

SQFG4.jpg

101_1028 Mason Bee Houses.jpg

100_4668.JPG

100_4669.JPG

100_4670 Herb Garden 2017-1.JPG

100_4673 Sweet Yellow Peppers 2017.JPG

100_4677 Bell & Spicey peppers 2017.JPG

100_4680 Raspberries 2017.JPG

100_4350 Mrs loves the garden.jpg

Bev Planting Onion Bulbs.jpg

Blackberries.jpg

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The beau brought a couple of pallets, so the potato grow-bags are no longer sitting on the grass.  I am so relieved.  They were BEGGING for gophers to tunnel in from below.

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WE2, I am jealous.  That looks like you have  a much bigger yard than me.  I love it. Love the water barrels. We have to plant around flower beds all the way around the house and then between the 2 sheds.  If DH was able I would plow up the whole side of our yard from other side of his shed all the way down toward the street.  That would give me another 12 ft. by I think maybe 14 ft. wide.  But don't have the equipment and DH can't do it. Something I would have to figure out as it would be a first time plowed area and the type of grass is a pain. Saint Augustine grass. 

 

Ambergris, I have seen where they take those pallets and make a V and use them as a trellis for cucs. and other climbing veggies. 

 

 

 

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What size grow bags are best for something like tomato plants. I'm thinking a 5 or 7 quart but I'm not sure. I've never seen one in person.

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Posted (edited)

Seven gallon, Jeepers, unless you are there to water them twice a day and have very good soil/fertilizer to put in them.  

Edited by Ambergris
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Thanks Ambergris! I just ordered a pack of seven 7 gallon bags. They came to $21.16 total. Plus if you wait until the first week of April for shipping, you get $3.00 off a digital purchase. So I can apply it to music downloads or an ebook. I'm not in a hurry for them. I may not use them until next year but I'll have them. 

 

I would liked to have ordered two packs but my credit card is screaming and I have a very small limit on my online credit card I use. Between the canner and jars and a few other items I'm nearly tapped out. :sigh:

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Posted (edited)

My county has a program where you can shovel free mulch (shredded yard waste, partly composted) from a site at the dump into your own bags and haul it home.  Supposedly, a county employee with free time will shovel it for you, but I never have run across one who admitted having free time.  You should check your local dump for a program like that.  You can make a quick head start on a compost pile with this, and also use it for the first few inches of your grow bags (more if it's more composted, less if it's just shredded stuff).

Edited by Ambergris
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14 hours ago, Ambergris said:

The beau brought a couple of pallets, so the potato grow-bags are no longer sitting on the grass.  I am so relieved.  They were BEGGING for gophers to tunnel in from below.

What size bags do you suggest for potatoes?   Maybe I can hide  made less visable those in our yard instead of trying to use our raised beds.

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Posted (edited)

My potatoes are in five-gallon bags.  I have grown baby potatoes in three-gallon buckets, but that really limited the harvest.  I've done five-gallon buckets before, and they really worked out well.  The plastic grow bags got damaged by a string trimmer, but still produced a crop.  This is my first year with these big felt grow bags. The buckets could be tucked among flowers in a bed or behind a shed or bench, yes.  They are very hide-able. short green bushes.

Edited by Ambergris
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On 8/10/2019 at 6:26 PM, Mt_Rider said:

This is a topic I bring up every so often.  Since I ran into this article, it's  very interesting to read about some folks that have actually kept the data and learned some things.  CAN we live off what we can produce....if we HAD to? 

 

As you all know, the answer is easy for me - no.  Even the pre-tech people groups migrated south and down in elevation.  They came up here for the summers. 


Given our current health challenges, no, we couldn’t live off what we can produce. But what we can produce (or, what I can produce, really), can go a long way toward feeding us. I have lots of fruits, some of which are medicinal: rose hips, cherries, apples, raspberries, strawberries, elderberries, highbush cranberries, hawthorn berries, mulberries, blueberries. I have a fair number of herbs. We have good egg production. And then there’s the vegetable beds.
 

Our pecan trees are several years from production right now.

 

But given our health challenges, we cannot scale up for grain production, which we would need to do for sufficient calories. We have enough land, good soil,  and a good food producing climate — in theory we could be entirely self-sufficient. But I don’t have the physical ability to provide the needed labor. So, our garden homestead can only be a part of our food survival, not all of it.

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We cannot live off what we produce as we are not able to do but so much and still we would need chickens both for meat and eggs as well as other animals for meat. Milking cow would be good but not happening in a neighborhood. We do have 2 blueberry bushes but right now are growing in pots and I am looking around yard for a good place to plant them.  No room for grain production or corn. So doing what I can to get as much stocked as possible and then using mylar bags and O2 aborbers to repackage into 5 gal. buckets.  Right now I have 11lbs of grits to repackage.  Can't get them in store now. Though the stores are better stocked when I went in this morning, no grits, no flour,  For us it will be stretching what we have for as long as we can.  I will stock from stores till we can't get things any longer and right now that seems to be the case.  Granddaughter called and she needs flour for bread. The navy packed their canned foods and flour she had and one bag was wet when she unpacked it and had to throw it out.  I tried to find some on line and all sold out. So can't order to send her right now. 

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Posted (edited)
1 hour ago, Cowgirl said:

But given our health challenges, we cannot scale up for grain production, which we would need to do for sufficient calories. We have enough land, good soil,  and a good food producing climate — in theory we could be entirely self-sufficient. But I don’t have the physical ability to provide the needed labor. So, our garden homestead can only be a part of our food survival, not all of it.

 

I've always liked the quote "Do what you can with what you have where you are."   

Edited by euphrasyne
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1 hour ago, Cowgirl said:

we cannot scale up for grain production, which we would need to do for sufficient calories.

 

Seems like I read that one can grind up dried beans for flour, kind of like corn.  If they can make almond flour and coconut flour, seems like dried beans would work and they grow pretty good where I am.

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1 hour ago, euphrasyne said:

 

I've always liked the quote "Do what you can with what you have where you are."   


Agreed. While we cannot be completely self-sufficient, what we can do is a big help and worth doing. And that is true of anyone. , at any level of home food production.

 

If I could have only one thing in terms of home food production, it would be my chickens. They are not too much work, they can forage for some of their own food, and the eggs are rich in vitamins and protein. I am glad to see more towns allowing backyard flocks nowadays. Backyard chickens should not be a luxury only for us country bumpkins. :)

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I could not survive on what I could grow. My diet would consist of some veggies and some berries. I don't know of anyone in my real life, who could. 

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Posted (edited)

So the real point of this thread...... :lol:  and it has WANDERED all over the place with interesting little side roads and back again........ 

 

...the point is that each of us in our OWN situations, need to make this assessment.  THEN....we must purchase and fill in that which we cannot produce in our current situations. 

 

:unsure:   (might have been easier to do BEFORE COVID....but most of us have done that anyway.  It's just another look at self-assessment)

 

MOST of us will not be in situations where we can produce enough basic calories.  It takes an awful lot!!!  It takes a lot of growing land.  That's why wheat, rice, beans, etc are the most popular starting point of long-term food storage, of course.  To make sure basic calories are covered so cells do not begin to die.  Boring, but life-giving. 

 

ANYTHING we can add to basic stay-alive-calorie-dense-foods will add nutrient and flavor....and some calories.   Nutrient is absolutely necessary, of course.  Flavor will reduce the very real "food fatigue".  My theory is that we modern folks have so much variety in our normal menus, we'd have food fatigue a lot faster than our GreatGrands ever would have. They'd never heard of soy sauce, tofu or edamame.   :shrug:  EVEN tho they raised fields of soy beans like my ancestors did.

 

As many have pointed out, our "normal" diet might include things that we find difficult to find or too expensive to continue purchasing under a collapsing world situation .  Therefore, we must be

 

--creative and  knowledgeable :  what CAN we grow in our location and how?   AND certainly, wildcrafting.  What can we find already flourishing  wild in our location?

--willing to expand our food choices beyond what we are used to....EVEN if we don't like some things.  WILD CATTAIL ROOTS....that's a tale from my childhood.  It's food!  Eat!  :feedme: 

 

MtRider .....we are talking about survival, not 4-H projects.  :whistling:  ....tho I would dearly love to spend TEOTWAWKI somewhere that cacao plants can grow.  :laughkick: 

Edited by Mt_Rider
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23 hours ago, Littlesister said:

make a V

 

We have several that are hinged...2x4's with wire...love them!

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23 hours ago, Littlesister said:

bigger yard

 

We have four city lots which is about a half acre.  The house sits on two and the garage and storage sheds sit on two.  The ornamental windmill sits on the two that are home to the garage etc. 

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We've never entertained the idea that we could live on our garden.  That's why we shop Amish so much.  When we get better situated at the homestead, we'll be adding rabbits and a few chickens.  We'd like to get a rooster and have the vet do the "vocal chord" thing to keep him quiet. I think our city ordinance says 3 hens...but we'll push the envelope and try to keep 6.  Like Jeepers said, without meat we'd be veggies and berries. 

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We would have some issues with getting meat. We could do some fishing though. Not sure if DH can still do any fishing without getting  to tired out but I can fish.  DH used to do rabbit hunting and deep sea fishing but both of those are off the table now. I could only fish off a peer or the edge of a lake. No boat.  I would hope to have enough canned meats as well as long term meats that we could stretch if need be. Which I am thinking meat only twice a week, and trying to make meals that would stretch that meat further.  Though I am looking into the chickens. Thinking I might have to get a privacy fence put up soon. Though I really don't want to spend the money for one. They are not cheap. I may be getting an air conditioner that you don't have to put in window. It is free standing but you have to empty the pan every so often. Unless I could find a way to run a line from it to under floor to ground under shed. Something to look into. Then I could turn shed into a food storage area instead of using it for my attic. Would need to go through everything and put what I really need to keep back in attic and the rest either sale in yard sale or give to salvation army or something.

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