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kappydell

pickled eggs

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Having been gifted with dozens of fresh eggs I dug out my pickled eggs recipes.  I have canned them and 10 years later found an unopened jar which I opened and tasted.  Yum!  one caveat though....I put dill in the jar with the eggs and after 10 years that dill weed was STRONG.  it sure made for lovely egg salad though!    I use Jackie Clay's recipe for canned pickled eggs.

 

JACKIE CLAY’S SHELF STABLE PICKLED EGGS

Others have asked for it and I gave my recipe. But if you missed it, here it is again. (And it’s also found in my book Growing and Canning Your own Food.)

18 whole, peeled, hardboiled eggs

1½ quarts white vinegar

2 tsp. salt

1 Tbsp. whole allspice

1 Tbsp. mixed pickling spices

Mix vinegar and spices in large pan and bring to a boil. Pack whole, peeled, hardboiled eggs into hot, sterilized jars leaving ½ inch of headspace. Ladle boiling pickling solution over eggs, leaving ½ inch of headspace. Be sure all eggs are covered. Remove air bubbles. Process for 25 minutes in a boiling water bath canner. Never leave unsealed pickled eggs out at room temperature. You risk danger from botulism and other bacterial diseases.

I also add 2 Tbsp. vinegar from my jars of hot pepper rings to “spunk” up my eggs. This is very good. — Jackie

 

For those who prefer refrigerator style pickled eggs, here are some quickies - actually they last quite a while but do demand refrigeration.

PICKLED EGGS WITH BEETS

2 cans (15 ounces each) whole beets

12 hard-boiled large eggs, peeled

1 cup sugar

1 cup water

1 cup cider vinegar

Drain beets, reserving 1 cup juice (discard remaining juice or save for another use). Place beets and eggs in a 2-qt. glass jar.  In a small saucepan, bring the sugar, water, vinegar and reserved beet juice to a boil. Pour over beets and eggs; cool.  Cover tightly and refrigerate for at least 24 hours before serving.

Nutrition Facts

1 each: 168 calories, 5g fat (2g saturated fat), 212mg cholesterol, 200mg sodium, 23g carbohydrate (21g sugars, 1g fiber), 7g protein.

Originally published as Pickled Eggs with Beets in Reminisce April/May 2009

 

GARLIC PICKLED EGGS

12 eggs

1 onion, sliced into rings

1 cup distilled white vinegar

1 cup water

1/4 cup white sugar

10 cloves garlic, peeled

Place eggs in a medium saucepan and cover with cold water. Bring water to a boil and immediately remove from heat. Cover and let eggs stand in hot water for 10 to 12 minutes. Remove from hot water, cool and peel.  Place the eggs in a 1 quart jar with the onion rings.  In a medium saucepan, bring to a boil the vinegar, water, sugar and garlic. Remove from heat and allow to cool approximately 15 minutes.

Pour the vinegar mixture over the eggs and cover. Refrigerate 1 week before serving.

Per Serving: 95 calories; 5 g fat; 6.2 g carbohydrates; 6.5 g protein; 186 mg cholesterol; 71 mg sodium.

(If you omit the garlic, you can have "plain" pickled eggs.  Same recipe.)

 

I do like pickled eggs - they are great for egg salad or deviled eggs.  Not being a beer drinker I have never tried them in another approved manner....as a nosh with beer.  But I bet someone knows about that somewhere!

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Another sheet in the "Kappy's Recipes" file folder on my desktop.  :sSig_thankyou:

 

DH and I love them too.  Yanno....I've never thot of /heard of using pickled eggs for egg salad or deviled eggs.  I did use bright beet-purple ones in potato salad. 

 

MtRider  :yum3: 

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Not pickled eggs but I did put a jar of "egg plant fingers" in my frig.  They're covered with Grapeseed oil and I added garlic powder, onion powder and some tony's seasoning.  Hubby won't eat them but I really like them for a snack or side when I have a cold plate for my lunch.

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An interesting pickle or two can sure jazz up a meal!  

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Hmmm.  forgot to mention they are great snacks for anyone doing lo-carb eating.  very satisfying.  You might need to change the sugar for a low carb artificial sweetener if the sugar is too many carbs tho.  They work that way, too.  

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I just drop sugar out of a lot of recipes.  If that doesn't work, and sometimes there's a chemical reason it doesn't, I try it again with half.  And keep fiddling until it works.  People say that some recipes eat the sugar,.

Edited by Ambergris
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No reason it would not work without sugar, many folks prefer the sharper taste of no sweetening.  I just prefer a little sweetening to tame it a bit, LOL. Artificial sweeteners are a problem tho, with the 'new' ones they always find about 10 years after introducing them that they are BAD so I just stick to my tried & true saccharine (sweet & low) recipes.  Once you learn its quirks it gets sweet enough to suit my purposes.  My sweet tooth is less than some have, and I'm glad of that.  

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