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Canning Frozen Veg. From A Store


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I've been watching some videos about canning store bought frozen corn and peas etc. I'm thinking  about it next summer. You can get 5 pound bags of mixed veggies at a Sam's Club organic and Non-GMO for a few bucks. Where I'll be, if a coon smells corn within a 100 mile radius of your corn he will strip it down over night. Doesn't hardly pay to plant it in some areas.

 

Peas are another story. I've planted and canned them too. About the only thing they were good for was hiding under a casserole. By the time I could get a mess of them together at the same time, some were too mature and had gotten big and starchy. They tasted okay but it wasc

hallenging. They all had that white milky stuff in the bottom of the jar. Probably starch? I think the window of opportunity for the pea and corn too is short.  Unless you have some helpers in the garden. I dont. To be totally honest we do not care so much for frozen veg. Unless it's in a soup or stew. 

 

I think someone here told me my pickles were a failure because they were too old when I bought them. Could have been. I have no idea how long they sat in the cooler at the store from the farm. Maybe I can find a big farm in Amish country who picks every day or two. Or a U-PIck-It even better. My pickles were soft and a little bitter. I blamed it on the Pickle Crisp. 

 

Has anyone here ever canned up frozen corn, peas or green beans that came from a store? If would sure make my life easier. There is an area fenced in for a small-ish garden plot but the   chain linked fence is only about 4feet tall. Anything  can jump over it or burrow under. Refencing that is very very low on my 'to-do' list.

 

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Now you have me thinking....it would not be necessary to blanch them for a hot pack, just heat them up until hot through, then pack.  I gotta go Googling......I  know it can be done with meat, no idea on veggies.  Fresh & frozen are nearly the same price here, so it would be a good idea for the things that are challenging to grow for uys here.

Edited by kappydell
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Yes, the thought of shucking and de-silking and blanching and de-cobbing all of that corn already makes my hands, back and neck throb. I saw a Youtuber from Nova Scotia canning frozen veggies and a couple of other Youtubers too. One of them rinsed her veggies before canning them because "You never know who handled them." I'd think the pressure canner would take care of that but whatever makes her happy... Also, most pre-pared fruit and veggies are picked at the peak of freshness and flash frozen right away. That would help with my starch problem. I'm only one person. I can't can an entire garden in one of two days. 

 

Try a YouTube search for 'canning frozen vegetables'. The first one I watched was a woman canning a frozen veggie mix. I'd link but I'm on the Kindle. If you can't find anything let me know and I'll link from the computer.  

 

Sigh, I thought some people might think I'm just lazy. 

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Dunno about canning frozen veggies but I sure know that dehydrating them works very well.  So easy and then stores very compactly.  Rehydrate for whatever use you want.  Excellent to toss in a stew. 

 

Ach.....I forgot this when I just made a stew two days ago.  :misc-smiley-231:   Would have been perfect since we didn't have any frozen.  I'm not fond of commercial canned peas.  :pout:

 

MtRider   ......another aging adaption to use in conjunction with gardening we CAN still do!

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I have a great deal of store bought frozen veggies in my freezer. I am getting ready to deydrate them.  From frozen state for canning, I have only used them for canning my soups, etc.  They worked out well for  that.  I think if I remember right that to just can them, you would have to heat them up so they wouldn't break the jars. Seems putting them in hot jars and then adding the hot water would crack the jars. So heating them up or blanching them a bit might work.

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Yes...I've jarred up frozen veggies including green beans.  Everybody kept saying "Oh, they'll be so soft and spongy"...NOT.  They turned out great.  We had bought them at a Mennonite store in their freezer section for 49 cents a bag.  We cleaned out them out and I promptly jarred them up.  I've also done corn and the bags of mixed veggies.  I love to dump a pint jar of mixed veggies (peas, carrots, green beans etc.) in when I'm making chicken noodle soup.  I've jarred up carrots too...even a whole bunch of bags of the slivered, organic carrots that we got free from a local pantry that was going to pitch them.  And...believe it or not...I've jarred up Okra! I even jarred up some of my home grown Okra with a drained can of sweet corn and a drained can of diced tomatoes.  It's wonderful over pasta! Guess one might call me a "gorilla/rebel canner"?

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I've dehydrated a lot of frozen veggies too. I aimed for 2 half gallon jars full of each veggie I wanted. I've got the basics but still need to work on leeks, onions, cabbage, potatoes, celery etc. I think after I'm done I'll work on quart jars so I can use out of those to keep the gallon of veggies sealed up and stored away. When I did the carrots I got the crinkle cut and they looked like little pebbles after I dehydrated them. But when they rehydrared, they got the ridges back. They look really nice.

 

Littlesister, you can get around that by rinsing the veggies under warm water (like in a colander) and having your jars and canner water at room temperature. Since they have already been blanched once I would imagine they could get too soft with two blanchings and a pressure canning.  Basically, having everything close to the same temperature. Hot food, hot jars, hot canner water. Cold food, cold jars, cold canner water.  By 'cold' I mean room temperature or a little chilled. 

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I did look up every you tube video I could find on this, and it does not look like the veggies would be "over-cooked" to mush any more than with regular canning.  I think I will try this....canned veggies not only keep without power, they have their own water (juice) so are a good option for when water supplies are limited.  I always use the juice even in commercially canned veggies to make gravy for the same meal or add to the small crock pot with the bones for bone broth.  Needless to day I don't have to add any salt - the salt in the juice helps draw out the flavors & minerals from the bones.  Of course, when the broth is done cooking I sometimes have to add a little water to CUT the salt, lol.  We have eater low salt for so long that many commercial foods are waaaaay to salty now for us.  

that reminds me I need to order more low salt wylers bouillon....none of the grocery stores around here carry it anymore.  Also gotta order some of the ham flavored bouillon powder.  The stuff I have stored is starting to have the fat in it go rancid after 8 years storage (yuck).  I do want some on hand though, it seasons a pot of plain beans when I have no ham bone  very nicely.  I just add it in place of any salt the recipe calls for and the ham flavor is a nice bonus. ( I will have to rotate it more religiously though.)  

Edited by kappydell
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3 hours ago, kappydell said:

I will have to rotate it more religiously though.

 

Same here.  I forgot I had so much bouillon in the basement but am now using it and replacing.  Ach, so many things to keep track of!  But when I find real beef ....not artificially flavored beef....I stock up.

 

MtRider  :canning: 

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  • 1 year later...

Eating a low-carb/keto diet eliminates a lot of veggies that I used to eat (and buy canned), so my canned veggies in the pantry are very limited as to variety, etc.  (Broccoli and cauliflower don't can up very well. :( )

 

I have plenty of green beans, sauerkraut, tomatoes, tomato sauce, and spinach, but that is about it. But, I also like "wax" beans and the canned ones are way expensive. :(

 

However, I have found a nice mixture of green beans, wax beans, and carrots in the frozen foods section of my Winco grocery store and have been buying a bag or two with each trip and keeping them in the freezer with the intent of dehydrating them when I had enough to fill all of the trays.

 

Image result for flavrpac vegetable blends

 

Then I thought, I'd better experiment with just a few beans to see if I would really like them and be able to consume them once rehydrated. I'm glad I tried. At first I thought it wasn't going to work out because they were soooooooooooo skinny and dry. Then I though it wasn't going to work because when I tried to "cook" them they didn't plump up and were very "chewy."

 

Since the protein I was having for dinner wasn't ready yet, I just added some more water to the bowl and let them sit until the chicken was done. Guess what? You're correct..................they plumped up just fine and were very tasty- almost as if I had just cooked them from frozen!

 

I am now dehydrating 4 trays. :D  (on a side note, I remove the carrots and keep them in the freezer to add to my dog's kibble)

 

Next I will try broccoli, and perhaps some cauliflower. I might even try some spiralized/noodle versions of zucchini and spaghetti squash that I found in the freezer section. :yum3:

Edited by Midnightmom
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MM, you shouldn't get me started on dehydrating so I'll apologize ahead of time for the long post. I REALLY like dehydrating .... :laughkick:

 

A couple of times when we've had extended outages and had to salvage what was in the freezers I've canned frozen veggies and they seemed to do fine with the addition of water in each jar.  I've also dehydrated a LOT of frozen veggies.  I love the way dehydrated foods store and how versatile they are. I make crackers and cookies in the dehydrator even.  I often buy bags of mixed, peas, broccoli, cauliflower, and etc when on sale and dehydrate them. They are already prepared and blanched and you only need to dump them on a tray.   I sometimes put them to soak in water the night before I want them and then cook.  I think they take a bit more cooking than from fresh though.  I love to put them into soup that's going to be simmered a few hours using broth (meat or veggie) as the liquid. 

 

I have dried zucchini spirals and slices for noodles.  They dry to almost nothing but are good to snack on like chips, especially if seasoned before drying.  I didn't find they made great noodles after drying though.  They only take a few minutes in boiling liquid or sauce to rehydrate but tend to break up some and be a bit mushy.  I have taken thick slices of dried zucchini and used them in lasagna recipes.  I layer them dry in the sauce and then bake and that works better because you aren't stirring them.  Spiraled veggies dehydrate faster than pieces do. Carrots make pretty 'noodles' in soup and are okay when rehydrated to use in salads but have a different texture. 

 

I also grind/powder (in my coffee/spice grinder or blender) the dried veggies with dried onions, peppers, celery, spices, and sometimes powdered bullion to make a quick soup to have when we travel or when I don't feel well.  It's not exactly instant but good none the less and the powdered base makes a good seasoning for other foods as well.  I usually boil water, put it in a thermos with the powdered veggies and in an hour or three it's a nice creamy soup to drink.  The amounts really do vary with the type of veggie but I use 1-2 tablespoon of veggie powder to a cup of water.   I've used a lot of different veggies that way and even have used cooked and dehydrated legumes to make a sort of instant chili out of.  Pureed dried Tomatoes rehydrate fast and make a good cup-a-soup.  The time is really dependent on what the ingredients are. Some can even be done in the microwave in minutes. 

 

I take warfarin, a blood thinner, and have to be consistent in the amount of vitamin K I have daily.  I dehydrate frozen spinach and powder it to use when I'm not having some greens that day.  I can sprinkle it on other foods without changing the taste a lot, make an instant soup from it, mix it into a smoothie, and even just take it in capsules if I choose.  I do other greens that way as well but it's not easy to find them prepackaged frozen as it is spinach.  I always dehydrate beet and other greens from fresh though and use them the same way. 

 

I started dehydrating foods over 50 years ago the old fashioned way on trays in the sun, over the wood stove, and in home made dehydrators.  My first commercial dehydrator was a four tray Excalibur (plastic not Stainless steel) that had different temp settings and could be used to raise bread or make yogurt also.  I still have it but it hasn't worked well for years. I have several other dehydrators but an old big ten tray one is plugged in ready to go all the time. I can use one or all ten trays with it but it only has one setting which is sometimes too hot and I have to vent it. Recently we got out the old Excalibur and I had my grandson and son look at it.  It seems that you can still get parts for it and my son was able to repair it, including a new knob as the old one was lost.  The $35 it cost will be WELL worth it and I can't wait to use it again. 

 

Can you tell that I might like dehydrating??  :engel-smilies-10-1:

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  :sSig_thankyou: Thanks for all of the info Mother. I have a few additional questions. If you have the time to answer them I would appreciate it.  

 

4 hours ago, Mother said:

 I often buy bags of mixed, peas, broccoli, cauliflower, and etc when on sale and dehydrate them.

I would like to put up some broccoli and cauliflower but wonder if the pieces that come frozen are too big to dehydrate? Or would you just arrange "same size" pieces on their own trays and remove them as they get "done?"

 

 

4 hours ago, Mother said:

I also grind/powder (in my coffee/spice grinder or blender) the dried veggies with dried onions, peppers, celery, spices, and sometimes powdered bullion to make a quick soup to have when we travel or when I don't feel well.  It's not exactly instant but good none the less and the powdered base makes a good seasoning for other foods as well.  The amounts really do vary with the type of veggie but I use 1-2 tablespoon of veggie powder to a cup of water. 

Do you add any kind of bullion to your "instant" soups to give them more body/a richer taste?

 

 

4 hours ago, Mother said:

I take warfarin, a blood thinner, and have to be consistent in the amount of vitamin K I have daily.  I dehydrate frozen spinach and powder it to use when I'm not having some greens that day. 

I take Xarelto (also a blood thinner), but my cardiologist has never mentioned anything about taking Vit K.  Let me correct that. My recent labs showed a VERY LOW Vit D level and in researching that I discovered that taking Vit K2 would help my body use it better, so I called him to ask about it. He said not a problem. The "problem" I AM finding though is that Vit K only seems to come in a blend along with potassium and calcium. My calcium is fine, but the potassium is a "worrier" for me because of how it might affect my heart, so I haven't supplemented with it yet. :blush:

 

One final question: How do you store your dehydrated goods? I plan on using empty pickle jars (the 'tall' ones) but am not sure if I need to use a desiccant or O2 absorber in the jar. What do you use?

 

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Of course I will answer any question I can.  I'm just sorry it took me this long to reply.  I somehow missed this post in my 'run' through Mrs. S last night. 

 

(it's strange how that 'run' never seems to burn up much calories :sigh: OH well, I suppose my brain cells like the exercise :grinning-smiley-044:

 

Okay, questions: 

Frozen Broccoli comes in florets or chopped and I dehydrate it right out of the bag but do try to separate out the bigger pieces and cut/break them to match. The chopped sometimes will get small enough to drop through the trays though so I usually use a smaller grid if doing them that way.  I use plastic craft mesh to line the trays with for a lot of smaller veggies, especially the mixed veggies as sometimes the corn will fall through. It's cheap to buy and cuts to fit but I have to admit I haven't looked into if it's food safe or not.  I've used it for years.  The cauliflower is another story.  If it's not chopped I break or cut it into smaller pieces as it takes less time to both dehydrate and rehydrate that way. With both of those and indeed with most of my foods I check them periodically to see how they are drying and take out what I feel is dry enough.  Be sure to let the pieces cool a bit before testing them though as warm will feel different, softer, than cold. 

 

I often stir granular bullion into my soup mixes after they are ground.   Sometimes If I'm sealing them in serving sizes I will stick a wrapped cube in them individually.  If I'm just at home I use my own frozen bone broth to make them.  I freeze mine in ice cube trays and just get out what I need for that mix, usually two or three cubes with water depending on how concentrated the bone broth is.  I do the same thing with vegetable broth if I want it vegetarian.  I also sometimes add instant rice or my own cooked and dehydrated rice blended a bit with the veggies.  I'm not a fan of instant potatoes but I have used it in the mixes as well to give it a creamy texture or to thicken it a bit.  I've also used ramen or rice noodles broken in small pieces in the mixes as well.  Make sure everything is thoroughly dry before you seal it and they will keep for ages.  I've had some mixes that were three or four years old be good yet.  If you want to find some recipes try looking up back packing recipes.  They have some really interesting ones that you can recreate with your own dried products. 

 

Xarelto is one of the newer breeds of blood thinners that doesn't require a diet restriction or extra testing.  I was offered that two years ago but it's cost prohibitive for me. It's expensive and my RX insurance only pays a small portion of it.  I was given the warfarin six years ago when I had open heart surgery and a pacemaker put in. I had to go for lab work monthly and was told I could have vitamin K rich foods but I would have to be consistent on a daily basis.  Vitamin K acts as a coagulant and the meds had to be adjusted to even out the effect. Your medicine doesn't work in the body in the same way as warfarin.  When it was found I would have to be on it long term because of Afib I was offered a home monitoring system that I love.  It's much like a blood sugar test kit with a finger prick and a gadget to test the blood.  I test weekly and call in the results. The Coagulation Clinic monitors it and calls to change my meds if it's too high or too low.  Medicare and my supplemental insurance pays for the kit and all the supplies and the cost of the warfarin is negligible.  This home test has been extremely useful for prepping.  I have managed to get about three months ahead on my warfarin but because there might come a time when I will be unable to get the warfarin I've used the weekly testing to try out different herbs and spices to see how well they work to thin or coagulate my blood.  Nattokinasse works almost instantly to spike my INR making it an excellent blood thinner but hard to control.  not exactly something I can grow though.  Turmeric and ginger are both more reliable at keeping the INR in range.  Garlic is also and those are things I can grow myself.  Anti-inflammatory herbs are useful too but not quite as controllable as the others but still good options.   I've also found that if I take pain meds, even Tylenol (which is the only one I'm supposed to take), my INR goes up, meaning my blood is thinner.  It's the same with the gout meds I occasionally take.  That gives me some options if needed too. IF I have them stored.  One good thing about warfarin is that if for some reason I have gotten too much or I have a bleeding incident I can bring the INR down fast with vitamin K.  Not so easy to do with the newer blood thinning meds as they don't work in the same way.

 

On that note, if you can't find just plain vitamin K3 and want to avoid the additives you can easily get enough with just greens or as I mentioned, dehydrated greens.  Kale has one of the highest levels of vitamin K.  Spinach and most dark leafy greens have high levels as well.  I am extremely low in Vitamin D as well and I constantly play the game of how to get enough without having to raise my warfarin meds more than I feel comfortable with.  You would not have that difficulty and could easily add greens to your diet.  Our bodies often times absorb vitamins and minerals better in a more natural form anyway. 

 

As for storing my dried product there is a difference between storing fruit and veggies or mixes.  I prefer to vacuum seal veggies in jars if I am not going to be using them for several months but I have found that if they are totally dry they will keep for a long time just in glass jars.  If I open one to use some of the product I don't bother to seal it again. The mixes I like to vacuum seal in half pint or pint jars but I have to be careful to keep the fine ground powdery ones from clogging the hose.  I use a piece of paper towel on top of the mix usually.  It's easy to lay a wrapped bullion cube or two on the top of these before sealing.  I have used plastic jars or bags to take the mixes along traveling though with nothing else done to them.   I do sometimes add O2 absorbers to the bigger jars like gallon pickle jars that are harder to vacuum seal.  I have also vacuum sealed them in bags and have had them keep for years that way. And before vacuum sealing came available (I've been dehydrating a LONG time LOL) I just stored them in jars or bags and they did okay too but didn't store quite as long.  I do try to store any of them in the dark or they tend to fade.   With fruit it depends on how dry I want it.  We love bananas, peaches, apples, and etc dried to a chewy consistency and those I store in bags and/or jars.  The jars sit on the shelves to be eaten often.  If I have room I store the bags of dried fruit in the freezers.  Small fruit like berries I often dry hard and they are stored the same way as the veggies.  They reconstitute easily. 

 

Hope I didn't miss something and that answered your questions MM?   

 

 

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Thank you Mother. I will re-read and digest it later, but just one comment for now.

I also have a pacemaker (3 yrs now) that was required for my brachacardia, and it has revealed that I also have AFib - so that is why I take the Xaralto. It is very "pricey" as you said, but I have "extra help" from the State of CA to help pay for my meds, so that is why I can afford it. I don't know what I would have to do if the rules "change" or if I have to move out of state. I'm not sure I am up to dealing with the balancing act of Warfarin and Vit K! :o :( :o

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Dh has a pacemaker and defibrillator.  He has had his since 2001. He got the watchman last year in June so he wouldn't have to take any type of blood thinners any longer. He cannot take that stuff as they cannot regulate him and his blood would get way to thin.  They wanted him on warfarin after they did the implant and they had to rush a prescription for Vit. K to him to get his blood levels back down. They then took him off of it though after the implant he was to be on it for 6 weeks. So they put him on Plavix and will be coming off of that next month. Had to stay on that for 6 months. And already he is having side effects from it.  Though if he can hang on till the 15th of March he will be off all of it. I think then we can get his arms to heal up. The skin is so thin it doesn't take much to start a bleed somewhere.  I have to be very careful how I handle him when lifting him up and such. 

 

I have canned both mixed veggies and dehydrated some that was frozen.  Did the same thing with corn. I have other frozen veggies such as butterbeans that I want to dehydrate and to can some as well. I like to can some for faster cooking times these days. As they do cook faster than the dehydrated ones. Hoping I can get that all going again when I get the help for Dh. On my one day off with a nurse taken care of him, I can just spend the day in the kitchen canning and dehydrating.  I would already have breakfast, lunch and dinner planned out and just to heat in microwave on that day. Never had any issues with either dehydrating veggies or canning them from a frozen state.  But with canning them I do warm them up a bit, but I have also just filled the jars and put them in the canner and then turn on the stove to let them warm up with the water before putting the lid on the canner. Then when water got hot the food was also hot. Never lost a jar doing it that way. 

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4 hours ago, Littlesister said:

I have canned both mixed veggies and dehydrated some that was frozen.  Did the same thing with corn. I have other frozen veggies such as butterbeans that I want to dehydrate and to can some as well.

 

I'm diabetic (Type 2) so I have to watch my carbs - even those from veggies - so I can't can most of what most people are able to do; corn, beans, carrots, etc are all to high of a carb/sugar content for me. The veggies that I can eat are either not recommended for canning or would not can well, that is why I am concentrating on dehydrating my veggies - squash(es), broccoli, cauliflower, leafy greens and any non-root veggie. We all have our challenges, don't we???

:rolleyes: ;) :thumbs:

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16 hours ago, Midnightmom said:

I'm not sure I am up to dealing with the balancing act of Warfarin and Vit K! :o :( :o

It definitely would not be easy if it weren't for the testing I am able to do from home.  If the SHTF and I had to do without that I would probably have difficulties but at least I now know what works and what doesn't.  But then, if there were to be that sort of situation I imagine a LOT of people with all sorts of issues would be in the same boat.  Insulin dependent diabetics in particular would be at horrible risk without meds.  I'm not sure there is an alternative for them. :(

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Midnightmom, I also am a type 2 diabetic. I am under control and have been using a carb blocker for when I do eat carbs. I am also taken VirMax blood sugar stabilization formula. That is working well for me.  I decided to try this when metformin was recalled first one drug company and then several companies. So I had enough of having to take medicine back to drug store for them to change it just to have that company recall it. This also happened with both mine and Dh's blood pressure meds. I do take a new prescription for blood pressure as I haven't found anything yet natural to replace it that works. But my blood sugar levels stay right around 90 to 100, so I am good with that. A1C last time was 6.5. I am trying to get that back down to 5.9 or a bit lower. So I do watch carbs also but if there is something like butterbeans that I want to eat, I just take the carb blocker. 

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Wow....very interesting topic, Midnight and all participants!  The medical concerns and work-arounds.  My mom and DD1 are on blood thinners and DD1 is also diabetic.  Wonder how she manages.  Well, I hope!

 

Mother....I thot I was utilizing my now-ancient, well-used dehydrator but you've blown that topic wide open.  Thank you...I've copied all that to word-processing to look at it more.  We'd definitely need to carry dehydrated food on our next EVAC....or {please no} Bug Out.  Eat crispy but drink fluids to compensate.

 

One summer we had an explosion of volunteer spinach.  I dehydrated/pulverized and sprinkled that on all sorts of dishes.  Scrambled eggs was a favorite.  So easy too.

 

MtRider  :sSig_thankyou:

Edited by Mt_Rider
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8 hours ago, Littlesister said:

Midnightmom, I also am a type 2 diabetic. I am under control and have been using a carb blocker for when I do eat carbs. I am also taken VirMax blood sugar stabilization formula.

 

A1C last time was 6.5. I am trying to get that back down to 5.9 or a bit lower. So I do watch carbs also but if there is something like butterbeans that I want to eat, I just take the carb blocker. 

 

If you are on FB, here is a group that you might want to check out. They are very adamant on dietary control FIRST, but meds if needed. They also don't pull any punches if you post a "cheat" type thread. The mods are all very very well informed on most topics and issues related to diabetes and will steer you toward any info you need to help you get/stay in control.

 

 

Quote
 
WELCOME / GUIDELINES
This group is for those who are taking their type 2 diabetes seriously and isn't afraid of some straight talk when it comes to constructive criticism. We promote a LOW CARB way of eating to help manage our diabetes. We DO NOT EAT grains, starches, fruits, rice, sugar, oatmeal, cereal, corn, beans, milk, pasta, potatoes. We DO NOT follow the ADA guidelines.
 
We define LCHF, low, and high carb as the following:
* LCHF (ketogenic diet): 20-50g / day or <10% of calories, based on level needed for ketosis
*Low Carb: <130g / day or 10-25% of caloric intake
*High Carb: >130g / day or 26-45% of caloric intake
 
This isn't a place for anyone looking to have a pity party. We're kicking diabetes in the rear, one person at a time. Join us if you really want to change your life.

 

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3 hours ago, Mt_Rider said:

Wow....very interesting topic, Midnight and all participants!  The medical concerns and work-arounds.  My mom and DD1 are on blood thinners and DD1 is also diabetic.  Wonder how she manages.  Well, I hope!

 

 

I am on a blood thinner because of the recently diagnosed AFib. Basically, the heart sometimes beats so fast that the lower chamber doesn't always get a full load of blood before pumping it to the upper chamber to be distributed to the body. (This is why a person w/ AFib is usually tired and out of breath.) Besides a lack of blood sent out to be oxygenated, the quick and therefore "incomplete" delivery of blood to the upper chamber means that sometimes blood is left behind and it can unfortunately "pool" and sometimes coagulate. If one of those "clots" are somehow pumped out......................... 

So, the blood thinner is actually given to prevent the blood that is left behind from clotting.

 

Quote

How does AFib lead to stroke?

  • The heartbeat seems to quiver (or fibrillate) in an erratic way. The upper chambers (the atria) of the heart do not produce an effective, regular contraction, but contract irregularly.
  • The contraction fails. Imagine wringing out a sponge. Without a good squeeze, water will still be left in the sponge. In the same way, when a heart contraction is either too fast or too uneven, it doesn’t completely squeeze the blood from the atria into the next chamber.
  • Blood pools in the atria. Blood not completely pumped out of the atria can remain and may pool there.
  • Risks of clotting go up. When blood has the opportunity to pool, it also has the opportunity to clot.
  • Clots can travel and cause blockages. If a blood clot forms in the atria, it can be pumped out of the heart to the brain, blocking off the blood supply to an artery in the brain, causing a stroke. This type of stroke is called an embolic stroke or some doctors call it a cardioembolic stroke.

https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/atrial-fibrillation/why-atrial-fibrillation-af-or-afib-matters#.Wr6v5S7waM8

 

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On 2/9/2021 at 7:44 AM, Mother said:

I take warfarin, a blood thinner, and have to be consistent in the amount of vitamin K I have daily. 

 

I was doing some additional research and came across some info that might be helpful to you.

 

Quote

A Patient's Guide to Taking Warfarin

Warfarin Interacts With Alcohol and With Certain Foods

  • Vitamin K - Eating an increased amount of foods rich in vitamin K can lower the PT and INR, making warfarin less effective and potentially increasing the risk of blood clots. Patients who take warfarin should aim to eat a relatively similar amount of vitamin K each week. The highest amount of vitamin K is found in green and leafy vegetables such as broccoli, lettuce, and spinach. It is not necessary to avoid these foods; however, it is important to try to keep the amount of vitamin K you eat consistent. Download our quick reference guide to foods that are high and low in Vitamin K. (PDF)

https://www.heart.org/en/health-topics/arrhythmia/prevention--treatment-of-arrhythmia/a-patients-guide-to-taking-warfarin

 

 

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