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Who got a new book/s for Christmas?


Dee

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These are the books I just got for Christmas: 

Mountain Myjesty 1 wild country by Ardath Mayhar

How to grow and create fresh air: 70 plus plants to purify your home & office. by Ayako Etsuke

God's plan in the coming depression:  America's last call by David Wilkerson

On the brink of a financial halocost:  David Wilkerson

Lawless End times war against the spirit or antichrist by Terry James

The lookout: A gripping survival thriller by Jack Hunt

SHTF survival boot camp by Selco Begovie and Toby Cowern

 

I have a lot of reading to do this year, Decided to take it easier this year. 2020 and the last 4 months of 2019 were rough months for us. So we are going to sit back and take it easy for a month or two. We need to catch our breath with all that has gone on over the past 12  to 16 months. That will give us time to build back up our emergency money and to take a good look at what we really need to be prepping for. 

 

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10 hours ago, Mother said:

 

Homey, did you get through One Second After?  What did you think of it?  

 

 

 

Still listening to the audio. They're about ready to execute the first two thieves who stole the medical supplies from the nursing home. I am learning a lot even though I only get about an hour break to listen per day. I forgot about how the cities can try to make the outlying towns take some of the refugees. I know the mothers sent their little children to the countryside towns during the blanket bombing of WWII. The children stayed for a year or two with total strangers, but at least they survived. There is lots of good info in this One Second After. Especially how people change when terrified (just look at Covid right now), and how everything you have saved in your pantry could quickly disappear if thieves or city refugees inundated your area. :imoksmiley:

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Homey, when DH and I listened to the book we both found a lot of thought provoking info. We've been preppers for decades and had even read the book before but that was when we weren't as old and fragile as we are now.  What he said about the elderly was haunting and really made us think and change some plans.  I will never think of a nursing home in the same way again.  Just like now with the pandemic the residents are vulnerable in so many ways, dependent on others for their care.   

 

The book definitely gets deep into the reality of survival.   

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1 hour ago, Mother said:

Homey, when DH and I listened to the book we both found a lot of thought provoking info. We've been preppers for decades and had even read the book before but that was when we weren't as old and fragile as we are now.  What he said about the elderly was haunting and really made us think and change some plans.  I will never think of a nursing home in the same way again.  Just like now with the pandemic the residents are vulnerable in so many ways, dependent on others for their care.   

 

The book definitely gets deep into the reality of survival.   

 

Agreed. We pulled my mom out of a retirement center 7 months ago to live with us. Even though she was 'independent' she was quickly failing without contact with the family. As a caregiver, I was able to visit but knew rules would change with the vaccine on the horizon.  It's still the best decision we made to extend her life. Her $5,000 apartment/care is still empty after 7 months. As other of her resident friends die of old age there, all of their apartments also remain empty.  No one wants to go into these facilities because they know they will never see their family again. Family is EVERYTHING to them.  :imoksmiley:

 

The chapter in the audio book on assigning big city refugees to small towns really hit home last night. In the back of my mind, I know we have a city of 350,000 an hour south of us, and then there's Chicago two hours south of us. I don't feel so 'safe' anymore.  :0327: Thankfully, we're off the beaten path, and I pray our survival skills will be required during the winter time. Folks will migrate south rather than the subzero north. It's hard to say that, but like your black ink shouts ... "the book definitely gets deep into the reality of survival."   :buttercup:

 

 

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We live within an hour of several BIG cities so would also be facing refugees. We live back in a long lane but by no stretch of the imagination are we off the beaten path. In face we're within the very fields that might bring people in.   It's a scary thought. 

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I thought “One Second After” sounded familiar.  I looked in DH’s library and found it.  He got the book when it first was published and suggested I read it.  
 

Things in our house have never been the same.  One section, in the book, is always on my mind, every single time I travel to TX.  The ‘preps’ I carry with me, will allow me to get home, or to MIL’s house.  I’m constantly considering the route I would have to take, what items in my suitcase would be added to my backpack, and the weather conditions for the hike.  No, I wouldn’t stay with my vehicle, I’d bug out as soon as I determined that the situation wasn’t going to change.  More than likely, depending on how close I was to MIL’s, I would still head home.  I know that sounds cruel, but, she lives in a very, very large city, on the border.  In “that” situation, life would be compromised, and I know she wouldn’t be able to walk to our house.  A lot to consider....

 

 

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I bought One Second After when it first came out. 

 

I'd forgotten some of the things in One Second After. I mostly remember the beginning and the end. I have it in the Kindle and I think it's time I reread it again. 

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  • 4 weeks later...
On 1/2/2021 at 7:55 AM, euphrasyne said:

If you like detailed historical fiction similar to Auel, Alice Brochardt is amazing.  Her silver wolf series is great -- Shapeshifters in ancient Rome so you get a bit of fantasy and a bit of history.  She also has an Arthurian series about Guinevere that ties into the characters from the Silver Wolf series.  

I love Alice Borchardt's books.  I wish there were more.

 

FYI, she's Anne Rice's sister.

 

If you like historical romance, Siri L Mitchell's books are great and generally have a Christian bent to them.  She also has some more modern ones set in France that are some of my favorite books ever.  They sound like (and generally are) fluffy romance novels, but there's always a bit of something in them to ponder.  Kissing Adrien and Chateau of Echoes.

 

A bit that I love from Kissing Adrien:

 

Quote

"It is because you think that faith cannot be fun.”

 

“Just so we’re clear, Jesus went through a lot of pain—which was not fun—in order to establish the Christian faith. I don’t see the fun connection anywhere.”

 

“It was before that. Long before. It is everywhere. Think of…the creation. The mind which created volcanoes and thunderstorms and fields filled with flowers.”

 

“Volcanoes are fun?”

 

“Of course. Think of the thought which conceived them. A grumble of the earth, a splitting open of the soil. A spitting of lava…fire, flames, cinder everywhere!”

 

So he criticizes me for spiritual heresies while he describes God as a pyromaniac.

 

“And then ash flies into the air, darkens everything. Clouds form. Huge thunderheads that growl and convulse and rip apart, sending torrents of rain to the earth. But every drop of water contains a particle of ash. And that water and that ash fall onto a meadow and fertilize the earth, and the creative work of destruction gives breath to a field of flowers. You see?”

 

“No.”

 

“Non?” Adrien folded his arms across his chest. “God could have done the same thing more efficiently, but instead, he created poetry and community among all living things.”

 

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OOTO, I read that one YEARS ago but not sure if I remember what all was in it.  I found it free online at http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks05/0500651h.html   I was surprised I could actually get it to read as it's from Australia but it appears to be all there.  I'm going to read it again.  

 

Euphrasyne and TheCG thanks for the suggestions. Just the books for I need to allay boredom.  And no, I didn't know that Borchardt and Rice were sisters.  How interesting.  

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5 hours ago, Mother said:

OOTO, I read that one YEARS ago but not sure if I remember what all was in it.  I found it free online at http://gutenberg.net.au/ebooks05/0500651h.html   I was surprised I could actually get it to read as it's from Australia but it appears to be all there.  I'm going to read it again.  

 

 

Thanks, Mother.   I was able to read enough on the site you linked to see that I would enjoy it.  

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2 hours ago, out_of_the_ordinary said:

Has anyone read Hannah Fowler or any other Janice Holt Giles books?   I have not, just wondering if anyone else has.

 

I've read all of Janice Holt Giles books.  I liked almost all of them extremely well.  A couple were so, so.  I liked Hannah Fowler very much.

 

Another old author, from the 50's and 60's, was Gwen Bristow.  Jubilee Trail, Calico Palace, etc.  We actually got our daughters' name, Kendra, from Calico Palace.  

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4 hours ago, Dee said:

 

I've read all of Janice Holt Giles books.  I liked almost all of them extremely well.  A couple were so, so.  I liked Hannah Fowler very much.

 

Another old author, from the 50's and 60's, was Gwen Bristow.  Jubilee Trail, Calico Palace, etc.  We actually got our daughters' name, Kendra, from Calico Palace.  

Thanks, Dee.   I'll have to put those on my list to look at.

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Right now I'm reading Letters of a Woman Homesteader by Elinore Pruitt Stewart.   It is good!  Each chapter is a letter the author wrote to her former employer after she moved to Wyoming in 1909 to homestead.   I'm just a couple chapters in.   I haven't gleaned much info on homesteading that would apply to my family, but it a very interesting and entertaining look at the place and time period, if that makes sense.  

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OOTO, I read Letters of a Woman Homesteader and liked it but I like reading original (or copies of) "Reciept" books better for all around info.  Each page is usually filled to the margins as paper was scarce much of the time. I believe a search would find some of them online though I haven't looked in years.  My daughter collects cook books and has many originals like that among her collection but they are rare to find now.  

 

Have you read Mrs. Beeton's Book of Household Management? It is not about homesteading but it is an interesting look into the past in Victorian Britain.  It, in itself, has an interesting history.  It was published in 1861 I believe.  

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Beeton's is amazing.  I collect antique cookbooks, its my favorite hobby.  I like your daughter already Mother.

 

Some of my favorite antiques:

1918 Fanny Farmer Cookbook

Common Sense in the Household by Marion Harland 1889

Confederate Receipt Book  1863

Recipes Tried and True  1894

The London Art of Cookery 1811

The Dixie Cook-Book 1885

The Complete Kitchen and Cellar Dictionary 1758

 

 

Many of these are available online as scans or copies.   All our lives are consumed by food.  We eat to  live, to celebrate, to mourn.  It is a combination of necessity, creativity, and desire.   You can look back at what people were doing  thousands of years ago (yale culinary tablets 1700 BC, or De re coquinaria *500 BC) and realize that they were not much different than us.  

Edited by euphrasyne
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I've read parts of Mrs. Beeton's books. She has quite a few of them. I had the Fanny Farmer Cookbook, but not the original, and it got lost in a move. 

 

The Book Of Household Management

https://www.amazon.com/Book-Household-Management-Isabella-Beeton-ebook/dp/B0084BNUAO/ref=sr_1_4?dchild=1&keywords=Mrs.+Beeton&qid=1612361652&s=digital-text&sr=1-4

 

My MIL had a cookbook that I would love to have had. It was about 3 inches thick with a hard bound cover. Each week the grocery store had chapters to add to the book. I don't know if they were free or they had to buy them. I know they were cheap. I used to go through that book often. 

 

I've tried to find a Betty Crocker Cookbook that was my first one when I was 10 years old. I'm not sure which edition it was though. 

 

Not very old books but much loved ones. 

 

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Euphrasyne,  My daughter has a couple of those books as well. I love them too but let her do the collecting as she has a bigger house :happy0203: and lets me borrow them.  In fact, DGS just brought me one of her books.  It's the huge Storey compilation of all their homesteading books together in a big oversized book. It was published in 2004 I believe.  I'll have to read it with a magnifying glass though as the print is extremely tiny.  I've looked at it before. She has a companion one she owns also. It's a more military type book on guns and all sorts of survival.  I haven't seen that one in a while either but hope to borrow it when I'm done with this one. I'm not sure who compiled that one.  

 

Jeepers, thanks for putting up the link to the Beeton one. It really is an interesting book. And yes, she has others as she was an editor.  Strangely enough I don't believe she had kids or did much cooking but she was great at compiling info.  I have two copies of the Betty Crocker Cookbook, one that I got for a wedding gift and one my daughter found that is older.  She actually got it for DH a couple years ago when he was just learning to cook.  It's got great instructions and pictures. 

 

Years ago, a neighbor loaned me a couple of old books she had that were pre 1900. They were from a set of The Cyclopedia of Domestic or a similar name.  They were fantastic. full of all sorts of crafts and skills of that era. It told how to paper a wall, rearrange a kitchen for an efficient working area, preserve foods, how to rid a house of vermin, and so much more.   Even how to make a sort of decorative wind instrument that hung on the wall.  How to make beaded purses, all sorts of domestic activities but also the niceties of the time, like formal tea foods and musical entertainments.  I should ask her family if they still have them and if I could buy or at least borrow them.  I'd copy every page. 

 

We all need to learn more about life in the past.  Not just because we might some day have the need to live that way but because learning those past skills will preserve them for future generations who might need them more. Some of the books like Beeton's and the Cyclopedia remind us we need to be more self reliant in all things, not just homesteading things for survival but in entertainment and enjoyment. We don't need to BE entertained all the time.  

 

Mrs. Survival is one of those CYCLOPEDIAS.  We are so lucky to have her.  Think of someone 100 years from now finding the 'archives' and 'collecting' them!  :reading: 

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Mother,   any thoughts on these Dr. Chrisopher books?   I don't have anything of his.  

https://www.christopherpublications.com/snhsyllabus.html

 

 

My "gut" is telling me to fill in holes/add to in our home library.  

 

 

Saw this on some site somewhere and wrote it down and it hangs on our fridge.  DD thinks it is hilarious:

"Ordinary people have big TVs.

Extraordinary people

have big libraries."

-Robin Sharma

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TheCG. Those books are WONDERFUL.  Thanks for finding them.  The ones I'm looking for are very similar but there was originally a whole set of them on different aspects.  I haven't found the exact ones yet but I hope to when I get deeper into that site.  In the mean time,  You know where to find me if you want me :laughkick:

 

OOTO, 

8 minutes ago, out_of_the_ordinary said:

Saw this on some site somewhere and wrote it down and it hangs on our fridge.  DD thinks it is hilarious:

"Ordinary people have big TVs.

Extraordinary people

have big libraries."

-Robin Sharma

I love that saying and it's going on MY refrigerator today. Then I'm going to make one up for my DD.  I studied Dr. John Christopher many years ago when I took a wholistic health course through Wild Rose School in Canada.  I still have and use the extensive course book I got then, his School of Natural Healing one.  It is full of wonderful formulas for different ailments. I have a couple other smaller books of his but this is the one I use most.  I have found there is a need to be cautious with some of the herbs he recommends if a person is taking RX and other pharmaceuticals in case of interactions.  I have my book pretty well marked up with notes but then, that's the way an herbal should be isn't it? :happy0203: 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Before our fire, we had a multi-volume encyclopedia with colorful instructions on all kinds of crafts like hammock-making, macrame, silver-smithing, quilting, quilling, and so on.  I thought most of it was frivolous at the time, but in retrospect, we got quite a lot out of it over the years.  I wonder if I could find another copy at a reasonable price.

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Ambergris, If it was old look at the link The CG gave above.  I haven't found the specific books I was looking for but oh my there is a LOT of info there.  I am the same way.  Had lots of books over the years that I didn't think I'd use but have turned to them again and again.  I do have to admit my most used homesteading book was Carla Emory's Old Fashioned Recipe Book.  I still look for recipes in that book as well as how-to stuff.  She was a loss the homesteading community could ill afford to lose.  

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