Jump to content
MrsSurvival Discussion Forums

Health and Safety in Extreme Weather Conditions


Recommended Posts

What advice do you have especially for those who have underlying medical conditions? (For cold or for heat)

 

Copied this post from a Diabetes FB group: Diabetes and Bitter Cold Temperatures

Quote
Happy Valentines Day members. Many parts of the USA and Canada are currently living in subzero and nearly subzero temperatures. So please take care of yourselves and your body. Dress warmly, in layers, and loose fitting clothing. Keep your hands, feet and legs warm; this is especially important if you have any neuropathy or peripheral vascular diseases. When you get cold your blood vessels constrict and blood flow and a reduced, and this can increase neuropathy symptoms, and make any infections even worse. Be out in this frigid weather for limited periods of time, make sure your feet are kept as warm and dry as possible, gloves/mittens are important, as well as hats and scarves to protect the head, ears and face.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post

Good topic, Midnight.....since we've been dipping below ZERO. 

 

Well one thing not mentioned was No Exertion.  With all that constricting of blood flow from cold, you cannot add shoveling or staggering thru deep snow to , for instance: ......congestive heart or cloggy arteries. 

[can you see this is a strictly non-medical person's advice and reasoning?]

 

No Anxiety either.....since that can further constrict blood flow.  :o 

 

Do we know what getting all furious does to blood flow?  :motz_6:  ...hey hey, lil' blue guy.  No hopping up and down.

 

=-=-=-

 

... other ways to make things worse in :frozen:  frigid weather:   alcohol...makes you feel warm; it's lying.  Dangerous.

 

....other food/drink?  What does coffee do?  Yes, it's hot and warms you but what does the caffeine do to the system, medically?  Other warm liquids or food would warm you.

 

==-=-=-=-

If you actually live where :frozen: happens frequently, buy some hand/foot warmers.  Hunters use them so look in sporting goods.  HUGE HINT:  If you've used a 3 hour packet for only 1 hour, zip it into an airtight container.  [Ziplock bag, canning jar, etc.]  Cut off from oxygen, it will stop processing heat until you bring it out into the air again.  No WASTE.

 

CAUTION:  If you have any desensitization of your skin....like extremities in neuropathy....these warmers get HOT!  Make sure to put enough insulation between your neuropathic-parts and this type of heat source.  Like...put the warmers in a pocket and stick your cold hands in with mittens on your hands....or something like that.  Treat these like a heating pad that's too warm.  Test the heat level with parts of you that have correct temperature-sensing...inside of wrist or something. 

 

=-=-=-=-=

Ears, nose, cheeks, fingers, toes are all extremities that will chill first.  Your small parts with less blood flow for warming. 

 

 

 

 

I walked today at 10* and tried to cover COLD nose without fogging glasses.  Everything else was just fine....I do "dress for success" in winter.  OR...stay inside. 

 

MtRider ....my two cents. 

  • Like 2
Link to post

I bought some toe warmers this year. They are just inserts that go in your shoes. Actually, just in the toe area. I think they are supposed to last 6-8 hours. I put some in the Jeep in case I get stranded in cold weather. Since I'm not out shoveling snow any more I don't have a big problem with my feet but when my toes get cold they hurt. It feels like electric shock going through them. Son is a plumber and he said a lot of the guys wear them if they know they are going to be working outside. I'll probably need the warmers when I move because I'll most likely be doing some snow removal with the riding mower. I can get a snow blade for it. As long as I can get in and out of the garage I'm fine. I also keep some nice heavy socks in the Jeep. I probably should put another pair in in case they get wet.

 

I have noticed my hands hurt in the cold more now. Even a real cold drink from the fridge hurts my fingers. I keep extra mittens in the Jeep too and also a pair in my coat pocket. 

 

My hands stay a lot warmer with mittens as opposed to gloves. I think the body heat from my hands help the fingers. I can ball my hands up in the mittens for extra warmth. I also have some of those convertible hand wear type things in the Jeep too. The kind that look like fingerless gloves with a mitten flap you can pull up over your fingers. They are good for when you need to use your fingers like at a drive thru or out pumping gas. 

 

I just discovered this week that a thin pair of pajama bottoms under my jeans makes a huge difference in keeping my legs warm. 

 

I keep spare clothes in the Jeep for both summer and winter wear. I should probably check the sizes. And also a heavy blanket stays in there too. 

 

One of the best things I bought for myself was a heated throw. That thing is delightful. I have one downstairs and one upstairs for the bed. I put one between the top sheet and regular blanket at night before I go to bed. By the time I'm finished showering and brushing my teeth, the bed is toasty warm both on top and bottom. Sometimes I turn it off but if not, it has an auto shut off. Since I sleep alone, it's just a good size for one person. And the heating pad is my best friend too. That is assuming there is electricity. If not I have a hot water bottle. 

 

Something I learned from the dog lady I watch is she always keeps a hair dryer on her desk in the winter. When she comes in from the cold she blows hot air up her shirt and on the hands and feet for a few minutes and it warms her up right away. 

 

 

The only thing that keeps me cool is AC or a fan. I'd rather have a fan than the air conditioner. Only other thing I can think of is to keep the shades/curtains drawn during the heat of the day and the windows open for cross ventalition. And do your chores either late at night or early morning. Especially if you are running anything electric that produces heat like a dryer or diswasher. 

 

And paper fans. I've got them all over the place. I got some cheap Chinese type fans years ago and have one in the Jeep, garage, all over the house and in my purse. They are the folding kind and only a few inches long. Very convenient. I think I got them online at Oriental Trading or something like that. 

  • Like 2
Link to post

We posted at the same time Mt. Rider. Good advice that I didn't think of. 

 

One time I bought a pair of bibbed ski pants at the Salvation Army for $.50. Yep, fifty cents. They were the warmest things I ever owned. 

  • Like 3
Link to post

Anyone dealing with icy sidewalks or stairs? This came across my FB feed. I checked the comments and multiple people say it really works. Might want to test it on the patio out back instead of the sidewalk out front though. :rolleyes:

May be an image of snow and text that says 'SIDEWALK DE-ICER For icy step and sidewalks in freezing temperatures, mix 1 teaspoon of Dawn dishwashing liquid, 1 tablespoon of rubbing alcohol, and 1/2 gallon /warm water and pour over walkways. They won't refreeze. No more salt eating at the concrete in your sidewalks!'

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
Link to post
12 hours ago, Jeepers said:

One of the best things I bought for myself was a heated throw. That thing is delightful.

 

I agree!  Wish I had considered using one a long time ago.  Saves on electric bill as it is less expensive to use the heated blanket than turn up the central heat at night.

  • Like 2
Link to post
7 hours ago, Midnightmom said:

Anyone dealing with icy sidewalks or stairs? This came across my FB feed. I checked the comments and multiple people say it really works. Might want to test it on the patio out back instead of the sidewalk out front though. :rolleyes:

May be an image of snow and text that says 'SIDEWALK DE-ICER For icy step and sidewalks in freezing temperatures, mix 1 teaspoon of Dawn dishwashing liquid, 1 tablespoon of rubbing alcohol, and 1/2 gallon /warm water and pour over walkways. They won't refreeze. No more salt eating at the concrete in your sidewalks!'

Wonder if it would work on wooden steps and deck?  I will try it on half my back porch first.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
Link to post

This is a super topic with LOTS of good ideas.  I have both a heating pad and a heated throw that are 12 volt with cigarette lighter plug ends for use in a vehicle. They give only very gentle heat but it all helps.  Now that we have that type of system in our house they are inside but if I have to leave I will definitely take one or both with me.  I have electric ones too which are well used too.  

 

I just saw something for making your own hand warmers on FB.  You put a cup of ice melt crystals in a zip lock bag, put  1/2 cup of water in another zip bag, and then put the sealed water bag inside the ice melt crystal one and close securely. When you want it to work you squeeze the bag to break the inner water bag and mix it with the crystals.  In a few minutes you are supposed to have heat.  I have NOT tried this yet but intend to.  Has anyone else used or seen this? 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post

No...haven't seen homemade heater bags, Mother.  Let us know.  I don't have ice melt.

 

Jeepers, I used the hairdryer after showers to warm up on Maui.  No heat in Maui homes but sometimes [like in TX right now] it's just extraordinarily COLD.  ..........

 

:sigh:    It was actually blowing the hair dryer down my shins that told me the MS was increasing.  I could feel the air movement and heat on other parts of body but on my lower legs, I felt nothing:blink:  I kept doing it over and over cuz.....it's an unbelievably WEIRD sensation....or lack thereof!!!  

 

MtRider  :frozen:  ......y'all be careful out there....more on the way in the East.

 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post
16 hours ago, Mother said:

I just saw something for making your own hand warmers on FB.  You put a cup of ice melt crystals in a zip lock bag, put  1/2 cup of water in another zip bag, and then put the sealed water bag inside the ice melt crystal one and close securely. When you want it to work you squeeze the bag to break the inner water bag and mix it with the crystals.  In a few minutes you are supposed to have heat.  I have NOT tried this yet but intend to.  Has anyone else used or seen this? 

 

What are "ice melt" crystals? 

I think I would be afraid that putting that much pressure on the outer bag to make the inner bag "pop" would also make the outer bag give way. Maybe not, but that is how I see it happening.  :runcirclsmiley2:

Link to post

Miki, please report your findings. My deck in Indy is super slippery when it's just wet. It would probably be a hip breaker in the winter. 

 

I use my heating pad in the car on long trips like to Pennsylvania. I have one of those converter things. You plug it into the lighter, turn it on, and then you can plug a regular cord in it. It is nice but I THINK it lessened the life of the car battery. I never ran it without the car being on but I would leave it plugged in while on vacation but not turned on. I could be wrong but I really do think it wore out the battery faster. 

 

  • Like 2
Link to post

MM, Ice melt is what you put on your steps and such to thaw the snow and ice.   I thought of the bags breaking too. If I try it I will probably use a heavy duty outer bag and a lighter one inside for the water.  

 

Jeepers, you would be using an inverter (12volt DC to 110 AC) (a converter, I believe, is the opposite) for the car and they do use extra battery power to work. There are many different wattages to run different things.  Most car ones are rated for small things like charging or even small tv's.   I'm not an expert but as far as I've been told heat takes more power so it would put a heavy draw on the battery. Most car batteries aren't deep cycle, meaning they can be run down and then recharged only so many times, but as long as you are running the car and had the right wattage conversion while using the heating pad it should have been fine.  :shrug:  At least you were warm on the trip and that's important too. :happy0203:

  • Like 1
Link to post

I know it's a 'verter' of some kind. It is the correct wattage but I don't remember what it is now. It's packed away in the Jeep. I think I have a heating pad out there too. Crimony, it might be cracked up with the heat/cold it's been throughout the years. Prepper mistake! Check your supplies, even non-food items, at least once a year. I might have clothes that no longer fit and a cracked heating pad out there. Who knows what else. Probably aspirin that smells like vinegar and protein bars I wouldn't want to eat.  :sEm_blush:

 

When I'm on vacation I keep a small hard shell cooler in the front seat next to me. It's the older kind with a flat removable lid. There have been times, after being on the road for several hours, I've taken that lid off the cooler and put it behind my back while driving. It forces me to sit up straighter plus gives great support. I can only stand it for a short time but it does help. I also keep a travel size pillow in the Jeep for the small of my back. I have a terrible back and neck. 

  • Like 1
Link to post

Your comments about heating pads, please, make sure they are in quality condition.
 

I freaked out the other day when I saw an article about a ladies house burnt down.  The heating pad on her bed sparked, caught her blankets on fire, she tried to smother the fire with another blanket, but, it only gave fuel to the fire.  She got out with her life, but was burned and had bad smoke inhalation.

 

 I don’t mean to scare anyone, but I would hate to see something happen. 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 2
  • Sad 1
Link to post

:runcirclsmiley2::gaah: That just reminded me that the electric blanket on my bed is YEARS old.  Might be time to find another but I so hate to throw out something that still works well.  But then, I'd hate to start a fire too.  Especially in this nasty cold.   Good reminder Annarchy.  Jeepers too.  I need to recheck the bugout bags in our car.  The camper van is pretty much ready winter and summer except for water and fresh foods.  It has clothes, dry food, all sorts of emergency 'stuff' and equipment but the old GMC we use for around here is....wellllll OLD and not well stocked. This never leaving the house has taken a toll on my brain cells. 

  • Like 3
Link to post

Preparing for backups to your backups seems wise now. I've been reading where quite a few northern states are having rolling blackouts in the middle of winter. That could be very dangerous for the sick, young, elderly or homeless. One thing that goes through my mind when the power goes out is my garage door opener. It happened to me once during a thunder storm. I had to cancel a dental appointment because I couldn't get the car out of the garage. The office is only about two miles away. They had power but I didn't. If my power is off then I'm stuck at home. Could be a minor inconvenience or an emergency situation like I needed to get some place warmer/cooler. I can disable it but there is no way I could lift a double garage door. Especially up over my head. And then lower it down again. Sometimes it's the simple things that can hang you up.

 

When we lived in Japan we, and everyone else, used one of those tall kerosene heaters. They worked great even with no fan on them. Knowing what I know now, I'd probably place a small fan on low someplace behind it. Far enough away that it wouldn't blow out the flame. Every gas station had a pump for kerosene so it was readily available. Do our gas stations have kerosene pump options? I haven't looked. 

 

One thing on my short list is a small 1-2 person pop up type tent. Covered with blankets and set up in one room a person's body heat could help it stay a few degrees warmer than just sitting out in a big open room. Another body would help but barring that a dog or cat would also help with some heat. Don't forget to cover your head. They say a lot of body heat escapes through the top of your head. Plus they are warm.

 

Got sleeping bags? They help hold in body heat too. A sleeping bag in a blanket covered tent sounds kind of cozy. Kind of.

 

I'm wondering if this solar minimum they are talking about is the cause for some of these cold temperatures in the southern states? If so it is supposed to last a few years. Everything is a cycle so we need to prepare for the next one when before it comes along. Cold, heat, rain, drought, illness or famine; it's always something around the next corner. 

  • Like 3
Link to post

Interesting thread...and timely with wave after wave of WEATHER hitting all parts of US.

 

 

A big thing in cold weather strategies is BREATHING....  As in:

 

-NOT carbon monoxide from a generator fumes

-or charcoal grills NEVER, EVER! [family of 2 adults/4 children are being treated in TX for this bad idea.  ]  :pray: 

-or from closing up your sleeping area too tight.  [blankets over a tent in living room ...okay but don't cover the whole tent or you MIGHT use up available oxygen.] 

 

If you're struggling to keep a small area heated, bring your house plants into that area....to keep them from freezing and we humans have such a nice reciprocal arrangement with them giving O2 in exchange for our carbon dioxide. 

 

Also, get up off the chilly floor.  Warm air rises. [anyone know if carbon monoxide will drop low or raise high in an enclosed space?]  

 

And there's always a 3-dog-night.....or one XXL dog.  :D

 

And what of folks on C-pap machines?  Sleep sitting straight up? 

 

MtRider  .....those in warm states must be frantic; not ever needing to know about such adaptions.  :frozen:

Edited by Mt_Rider
  • Like 2
Link to post
Quote

There are three things that make carbon monoxide extremely dangerous: 1) The molecules of carbon monoxide are so small, they can easily travel through drywall; 2) Carbon monoxide doesn’t sink or rise – it mixes easily with the air inside a home; 3) It is an odorless gas, so without an alarm to notify you that it is in your home, you likely wouldn’t notice until it was too late. 

 

 

So... it doesn't do either one. :( 

 

 

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1
  • Sad 2
Link to post

We have friends who are staying in their tents in their living rooms.  We also have friends who slept out in their car because they could at least run their heater.

 

I do need to get a battery-operated CO detector for when we use the propane heaters inside the house.

  • Like 3
Link to post

:wave: Hi, Babysteps.  Nice to see you.  

 

Thoughts on tents inside the house. Make sure they are pop ups without the need to stake them down.  Use them on the beds if possible so you have comfort and warmth below you.  It helps to use the metal coated emergency blankets or even aluminum foil beneath your body to reflect heat back.  These and other small areas can be easily heated with an oil lantern or candle lantern but only when there is enough air inside the area.  AND when there is every caution taken to prevent fires.  This is best done before crawling into the area just to warm it and then extinguished before sleeping.  We used to heat our A-frame tents that way during Civil War Reenactments by hanging the lantern or candle lamp from the ridge pole.  Those tents, of course, were not air tight. 

 

Remember those 'table or furniture tents" the kids love to build?  Those work great for a place to cover with blankets and snuggle into. Years ago one of our wooden dining room tables had a small hook screwed into the underside of it specifically for hanging a lantern from.  The kids used to hang a battery operated one from it for play.  We used that area several times over the years for a heated space during power outages.  Heat it up with a lantern, toss in three kids and a BIG dog and they were warm all night long.  You can do the same thing in a small bathroom using the tub as a bed or in a closet in a pinch.  Two chairs pushed back to back or a couch and chair also make good frameworks for tents. 

 

Definitely follow Jeepers suggestion to cover your head as it does appear to help even if it's just pulling a corner of the blanket over it.  BTW Jeepers, that problem with the garage door opener could be very serious.  Is there any way you can set it up so that you have some sort of leverage nearby to lift that door?  Perhaps even a rope set up on a double pulley sort of thing to help with the lift. If not then that's probably when you need a nice strong neighbor close by. 

 

The CG, Stay safe.  I'll be praying you don't get another round of cold and snow.  :pray:

 

 

 

 

  • Like 4
Link to post

As for my garage door, what I'd probably do in a real emergency, is call the non-emergency phone number for the fire or police station to send out some hunky men to help me get out. Have you seen those firemen's arms. Not that I've noticed...just sayin. :Blushing:

 

If it was a medical emergency I'd call an ambulance. 

 

I've thought about pulling the car out when I know a storm is brewing but I'm afraid the wind might blow something into it like a tree. Or get hail damage. Then again it could just end up as a shower. Danged if you do, danged if you don't. 

  • Like 3
Link to post
On 2/16/2021 at 1:48 AM, Jeepers said:

Miki, please report your findings. My deck in Indy is super slippery when it's just wet. It would probably be a hip breaker in the winter. 

 

I use my heating pad in the car on long trips like to Pennsylvania. I have one of those converter things. You plug it into the lighter, turn it on, and then you can plug a regular cord in it. It is nice but I THINK it lessened the life of the car battery. I never ran it without the car being on but I would leave it plugged in while on vacation but not turned on. I could be wrong but I really do think it wore out the battery faster. 

 

Dh was skeptical so I only poured it on one side of the porch and at the entrance going out.  It worked great at the entrance and is still clear.  There is snow on the porch but doesn't seem to have ice under it.  Good deal.  I will be making that again!

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1
Link to post

Thanks Miki. That's good to know.  :bouquet:

 

And cheap too. Plus better on the surrounding plants and puppy toes. Salt and that chemical stuff can really burn their little pads if it isn't washed off. Or in Koa and Abby Girls case, BIG pads.  :P

 

It seems like all of the DIY formulas start with 'Dawn dishwashing liquid'. That might be the stock to buy.  :D

  • Like 1
  • Haha 1
Link to post

:hi:  Babysteps!  Thanks for that data on the deadly CO1.  Neither up or down...assimilates other air.  AND goes thru drywall EASILY.....  :unsure:  

 

:blink:  So WHAT is on the walls between modern garages and the actual house????

 

I didn't know that one either.  Colorless/odorless....knew that.  Girl from my high school...and the boy in the car both died from that. 

 

Yes, battery-powered monoxide detector!!!!

 

Good ideas, Mother.  My lil' brother and I were endlessly constructing structures from furniture and blankets.  :lol:  Guess what he does professionally?  [Doesn't use blankets or dining room tables tho.]

 

A lot of things about this whole topic of Health/Safety during WEATHER or DISASTER events....  Duplicate every function you need.  Double or triple the ways you do living:  water, heat/cooling, sanitation, food: preparing-eating, sleeping safely, communications, medical issues - your normal ones and those brought on by the emergency.  Walk thru your normal day with a notebook and pencil  [ or take notes on my cell phone] :rolleyes: 

 

  ....'Course we're all doing this but.... look carefully for gaps in THIS type of prep.

 

MtRider  .....never know when you might get snowed in.....in Dallas.  :frozen:  Or flooded in Nevada. :knary: 

 

  • Like 3
Link to post

Mt. Rider, between garage and house is usually just drywall with a layer of insulation between them. Mine is cement about a foot up and then drywall. It helps to paint the garage walls. Makes it a little less permeable.

 

Mother, I'm stealing your idea about a lantern hook under the dining room table. What a great inside fort that will make for You-Know-Who. Probably take me half the night to get in and out of it though. Oh, my aching back. Maybe just 'do lunch' under there. I'm just glad he is too young to post things on Youtube. 

  • Like 2
Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Terms of Use.