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Milking Cow


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Cows....nope.  But I had Nigie goats for some years.  Nigerian Dwarf Milking goats.  Love goats....the lil' hooligans!!! 

 

Having a milking stanchion was imperative for the goats.  Especially since the first goat and I ....her first kid.  My first time milking anything....  RODEO!!!    I wanted to learn to milk SO VERY BADLY ....or it would never have happened.  But after 2 months, she and I were in sync.....

 

MtRider  ......I can give lots of goat tips....so can Mother who taught me by phone.  LOL 

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We had a family milk cow for many years a lot of years ago.  One bit of advise I can offer is to make sure you get one that has been hand milked before and is used to being led and handled.  In other words, tame. Especially if you are new to milking.  Also, with any milk animal,  ask to be able to taste the milk before buying and how much milk the animal gives. You might ask yourself just how much milk you want or need and what you are planning to do with the excess. Believe me with a cow there WILL be excess unless you have a huge family.  Our cow could give us five gallon or more a day on a consistent basis and double that when first fresh.  Ask about bacteria records and about the butterfat content. Ask for health records.  Has she had consistent trouble with milk fever or mastitis both of which can be cleared up but are still a concern. Make sure you have a proper and secure place for the animal. Cows, like goats, can be notorious escape artists even though they are big.  

 

Like Mt._R said, I'm well versed in goat care.  Her and I DID spend a lot of phone time together, I was even there via phone when her first goat kidded. An exciting time for sure.  If you don't need a huge amount of milk or aren't planning a making a lot of butter then a goat or two or three might be easier.  They can be freshened at various times so you have milk all year.  They can be large producers or give very rich milk depending on the breed and unlike what some people say the milk can be very rich and very sweet.  It all depends on animal, the feed, and health of the animal.   I am partial to Nigerian Dwarfs because of their ability to give very rich and abundant milk and their small size to handle and house.  They can have up to five babies at a time and easily raise all of them.  I also like the idea of being able to leave the kids with them for an extended time. That means I could leave the kids with the mom in the daytime and remove them at night so that I'd have milk in the morning for my family, or visa versa if I didn't want to milk early mornings. 

 

So it depends on your needs and situation.    I am no longer able to handle milk animals but I sure miss the raw milk.  Okay, and the animals too.   Good luck with getting what you want and need.  

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Thanks for the tips, and encouragement! I'm not sure I can convince DH on goats, but maybe someday! We have 7 in our family (including a 1.5 year old!), plus my parents and DH's dad. DD and I also make butter (and it's buttermilk), yogurt, farmer's cheese, and have high hopes of making more variety of cheeses. I realize it's a lot of work, but that's actually kinda what we're going for. And...so much to learn! Hopefully work ethic being one of them. Kids are 20, 9, 8, almost 7 and 1.5. I'll keep you posted! Hopefully we will get one this spring. Thanks again!! :bighug2:

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I can’t add much to Mother’s post.  Except mentioning the work.  Cleaning the manure, milking twice a day, feeding and veterinary services.  We had 20 cows, in the 60’s & 70’s.

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11 hours ago, Annarchy said:

I can’t add much to Mother’s post.  Except mentioning the work.  Cleaning the manure, milking twice a day, feeding and veterinary services.  We had 20 cows, in the 60’s & 70’s.

That's a lot of cows!! I'm not sure what we would do with all the milk! :unsure:

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12 hours ago, Joyfilled said:

That's a lot of cows!! I'm not sure what we would do with all the milk! :unsure:


Actually, we sold our milk to Kraft.  Their truck would come, once a week & pick up the milk cans, those old large metal cans, and replace them with empty ones.  Once a year, in the late spring, they would deliver a big package of caramel candy.  

 

We had one older angus, that produced 75% cream.  Her milk was used to make butter, cheese & such.  Mmmmmm.... fresh whole milk...  :yum3:

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  • 4 months later...

Wow. Shortly after I wrote that we wanted to get this cow, Hubby lost his job. We were tight for a while, but didn't get the cow. And now, praise God, he has a new, better job!! It pays more, and he works from home for the most part. That said, he still has to travel about 20%, so I am hesitant to get the cow. That means we (kids and I) would be in charge of milking while he's away. It gets to be a lot with the other chores, and a now 2 year old that still wants to cuddle with Mama especially if Dad is gone. So....not sure what to do. Prices for everything is going up, if you can find it, including dairy, so it sounds like a good idea....

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I never owned a cow or goats. But I know it would be fun. My grandparents had a milking cow.  I was young, so don't remember to much about it. But I do remember grandma making butter, and the milk as I remember was really good. Store bought does not compare to fresh straight from the cow. 

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