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HPAI (bird flu) outbreaks in USA 2022


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There were millions of birds slaughtered here (Iowa) in the last go around.  I've been listening about it on the news and when it's mentioned it seems like there's another outbreak here or there.  

 

Too many things coming together to make you wonder what's going to happen next and when they'll culminate into more tragic consequences.

 

Let's keep our preps growing ladies!

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I read about a mass culling of chickens at the beginning of this winter in N.E. Indiana. It's been pretty bad there. It soon spread to N.W. Ohio.  

 

I really wanted to have bird feeders in the yard for g-son to watch but I'm holding off again this year. Last summer, in Indiana, they warned people to refrain from feeding the wild birds for fear of spreading it further. That was in the N.E. Indiana/Chicago area. They will probably issue the same warning this year. I suppose it's even possible they could ban backyard wild bird feeding all together.  

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Last year, they asked people to stop feeding birds in NY State, too. They showed photos of an unknown bird disease that they were afraid would spread through cross breed congregations at bird feeders. The birds in the photos appeared to have coryza, which is a common disease in chicken flocks. We feed the birds at my mom's apartment because she loves to see all of the wildlife that is attracted by the seeds to her small patio. It would be a shame if we had to stop feeding them entirely.

 

I just spotted this article about the presence of the dangerous type of bird flu in NY State. I am not in Suffolk County, but bird diseases can travel as fast as the crow flies.

 

https://hudsonvalleypost.com/bird-flu-that-kills-most-infected-humans-found-in-new-york-state/

Edited by themartianchick
Edited to add an article link
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1 hour ago, themartianchick said:

Last year, they asked people to stop feeding birds in NY State, too. They showed photos of an unknown bird disease that they were afraid would spread through cross breed congregations at bird feeders. The birds in the photos appeared to have coryza, which is a common disease in chicken flocks. We feed the birds at my mom's apartment because she loves to see all of the wildlife that is attracted by the seeds to her small patio. It would be a shame if we had to stop feeding them entirely.

 

I just spotted this article about the presence of the dangerous type of bird flu in NY State. I am not in Suffolk County, but bird diseases can travel as fast as the crow flies.

 

https://hudsonvalleypost.com/bird-flu-that-kills-most-infected-humans-found-in-new-york-state/

We had the same restrictions on home bird feeders in West Virginia last year. Thankfully, the restriction were lifted in August 2021. 

https://wvdnr.gov/wvdnr-provides-update-on-diseased-birds-in-eastern-panhandle/?fbclid=IwAR3oTrCpMG3-VvEv9xyUsYOr0CkldPbp4cNoH_kOPCAUVXMQTDG9iFbGCC0

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We had something similar that happened two years ago in California. Some type of illness killed all the finch type birds in my county and people were asked not to feed them so they wouldn’t congregate together. We had none at all last year and my backyard is usually loaded with them. This month I’m starting to see handfuls of them come back but I don’t think we still have restrictions.

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  • 1 month later...

April 21:

For the first time, a highly contagious strain of bird flu has been detected in three dead bald eagles in Georgia, the state Department of Natural Resources announced Thursday.

Testing at a federal lab in Iowa confirmed that the virus was responsible for the deaths, according to Bob Sargent, a program manager with DNR’s wildlife resources division.

The strain of avian flu is also believed to be the culprit behind disruptions in breeding by bald eagles along the Georgia coast. There were roughly 30% more failed nests that did not fledge young eaglets along the coast so far this year, the state said.

 

In other parts of the state, eaglets appear to be fledging at normal rates, Sargent said, though results of a statewide survey won’t be ready until later this spring.

“We’re concerned, but I would not say that we’re alarmed by this,” Sargent said. “Birds in the interior of the state are exhibiting normal nesting success.”

 
 

The strain of bird flu detected in the three dead bald eagles is known as highly pathogenic avian influenza, or HPAI. It is found worldwide, is untreatable and often lethal to birds that contract it.

No cases of the virus have ever been detected in humans in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Human infections have occurred in other countries, most often after long periods of unprotected contact with infected birds, the CDC says.

One infected bird each was found in Chatham, Glynn and Liberty counties along the Georgia coast, but DNR said additional eagle carcasses are being tested. A total of 11 other birds, including multiple species of ducks, have also tested positive for bird flu this year in Georgia, DNR said.

Several eagles have tested positive in surrounding states, including the Carolinas and Florida. Wild birds in 30 states have been found infected so far this year, including birds in some commercial and backyard poultry and pheasant flocks, mostly in northern states, according to the U.S. Department of Agriculture.

Georgia’s poultry industry has not reported any cases as a result of this outbreak. The last cases to affect Georgia’s chicken industry were in 2015, according to state Department of Agriculture spokesperson Bo Warren.

 
 

Still, the stakes are high for Georgia’s chicken producers. Georgia is the top U.S. producer of broiler chickens, a $4 billion industry.

In a statement, Warren said the bird flu cases show that “it’s imperative that we remain vigilant in protecting our domestic bird populations from the virus and follow all biosecurity protocols.”

Symptoms of HPAI in birds include lethargy, tremors and seizures. DNR says the public should report sick or dead birds to the agency, but such birds should not be handled.

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WASHINGTON, March 30, 2022 – The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in a non-commercial, mixed-species backyard flock (non-poultry) in Berkshire County, Massachusetts; a non-commercial, mixed-species backyard flock (non-poultry) in Johnson County, Wyoming; a commercial poultry flock in Johnston County, North Carolina; a non-commercial, backyard chicken flock (non-poultry) in Franklin County, Ohio; and a non-commercial, backyard chicken flock (poultry) in Kidder County, North Dakota.


Feb 16, 2022
State Department of Agriculture asks growers to take safety precautions
An outbreak of bird flu could disrupt the supply of fresh poultry if it spreads through Georgia.

A deadly strain of Avian Influenza has been found on a commercial turkey farm in Indiana, a chicken operation in Kentucky and in a backyard flock in Virginia.

Georgia boasts a $4 billion industry and is the nation’s top producer of broiler chickens. The Georgia Department of Agriculture says there are reports of infected wild birds in Hart County, Georgia, but not in its chicken flocks.

The department on Wednesday suspended the sale of live chickens at trades shows, flea markets and other outlets. It called on growers to implement biosecurity practices to protect their flocks, such as keeping birds inside, limiting their exposure to outdoor water sources and maintaining sanitation.

This strain of the bird flu is highly contagious and deadly to poultry, which is Georgia’s most lucrative farming sector.

No human cases of the virus have been found in the U.S., the USDA said.

State officials are quarantining the infected operations in Kentucky and Indiana and killing and disposing of the birds to prevent spread of the disease. Agriculture officials said the flu does not present a food safety risk if chickens or eggs are handled and cooked properly.

Any cases of bird flu should be reported to the Georgia Avian Influenza hotline at (770) 766-6850.

Edited by Ambergris
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I noticed just this week that one of the sales advertisement for chicken contained the words (in very tiny print) ‘Previously frozen’ similar to what we often see on fish here in the Midwest.  :(

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6 hours ago, Ambergris said:

WASHINGTON, March 30, 2022 – The United States Department of Agriculture’s (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has confirmed the presence of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in a non-commercial, mixed-species backyard flock (non-poultry) in Berkshire County, Massachusetts; a non-commercial, mixed-species backyard flock (non-poultry) in Johnson County, Wyoming; a commercial poultry flock in Johnston County, North Carolina; a non-commercial, backyard chicken flock (non-poultry) in Franklin County, Ohio; and a non-commercial, backyard chicken flock (poultry) in Kidder County, North Dakota.

 

What does that mean?

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backyard chicken flock (non-poultry  

 

My guess is there's a zoning or other code category for "backyard chicken flock" that can be of ducks, and that they don't have a similar category for "backyard duck flock."  Or Guinea hen?

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I think you are right Ambergris. I did a little searching and I think whatever zoning codes decide is what they allow. Ducks can be poultry and guinea can be fowl. Pigeons are a Dove and can be either one too. Kinda sorry I brought it up. :grinning-smiley-044:

 

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Apr. 21—WILLMAR

— The daily update on the status of avian flu in Minnesota now shows 50 sites of infection and nearly 2.3 million birds impacted.

According to the state Board of Animal Health web page, H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza was confirmed Wednesday, April 20, at two commercial meat turkey sites in Todd County — the first confirmed sites in that county, each holding 30,000 birds.

A third new site listed Thursday was in Stearns County, a flock of 63,746 commercial meat turkeys, bringing that county to six total sites.

Based on West Central Tribune archives, the fourth new flock listed Thursday appears to be the seventh site identified in Kandiyohi County, a commercial meat turkey flock of more than 38,000. The eighth site had been listed one day earlier on the web page devoted to avian flu response in the state at

bah.state.mn.us/hpai.

Michael Crusan, communications director for the Minnesota Board of Animal Health, did not have information immediately available to confirm that, but told the West Central Tribune that the board is receiving updated information many times a day, while the web page is updated just once a day.

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NELL GREENFIELDBOYCE, BYLINE: The last time a deadly new bird flu showed up here - seven years ago - it really hit poultry farms.

BRYAN RICHARDS: In 2014, 2015, we saw, I think, somewhere in the neighborhood of 50 million domestic poultry affected.

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Bryan Richards says that virus didn't infect many wild birds. This time, it's different.

RICHARDS: We've got wild bird detections in 32 states.

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Richards is the emerging disease coordinator at the U.S. Geological Survey's National Wildlife Health Center. He says this virus came across the Atlantic a few months ago, probably carried by migratory birds.

RICHARDS: It can kill some waterfowl, but I think there's pretty clear evidence that some waterfowl likely are not affected by it. And therefore, they're perfect transport mechanisms for taking it very long distances.

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Since this virus arrived, it's killed birds that belong to more than 40 species - mostly ducks and geese, but also scavengers like black vultures and bald eagles that presumably eat the carcasses of birds killed by the virus.

David Stallknecht is a bird flu researcher with the University of Georgia. He says there have been large die-offs of ducks in Florida and snow geese in the Midwest.

DAVID STALLKNECHT: This outbreak in the wild bird population is a lot more extensive than we saw in 2014, 2015 - just a lot more birds appear to be affected.

GREENFIELDBOYCE: So far, he hasn't seen indications that any species will lose so many birds that it will become threatened. But the spread of this virus in wild birds suggests that this outbreak may not burn itself out like the last one did. Ron Fouchier is a flu expert at Erasmus Medical Center in the Netherlands.

RON FOUCHIER: There's a chance that the virus will stick around, and this will become a long-term problem.

GREENFIELDBOYCE: He says that's what this virus has done in Europe, where it arrived a few years ago and never left. It's been causing massive die-offs in wild birds and continues to strike poultry flocks, resulting in the deaths of more than 17 million poultry birds since December. Fouchier says there's only been one known human infection - a farmer in the United Kingdom who lived in close quarters with ducks that got this flu. That person tested positive but didn't have any symptoms.

FOUCHIER: We haven't seen any other farmers or veterinarians or other people being infected.

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Still, since this bird flu arrived in the United States, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has been keeping a close watch. Todd Davis works on animal-to-human diseases at the agency. He says bird flu viruses related to this one have sickened and even killed people during past outbreaks in other countries. That's why public health officials here have been monitoring the health of more than 500 people in 25 states who have had contact with sick or dead birds.

C TODD DAVIS: Because humans have no prior immunity to these viruses typically, if they were to be infected and spread the virus to other humans, then we could have another pandemic virus on our hands. And so that's our primary concern.

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Besides testing any people who show flu-like symptoms, they're also closely tracking genetic changes in the virus, looking for anything that would suggest it might become more of a threat to people.

Nell Greenfieldboyce, NPR News.

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Chinese man hospitalized with H5N6 avian flu infection  [different flu, but still bird flu]
The H5N6 avian flu virus has sickened one more in China, a man from Sichuan province in the country's southwest, Hong Kong's Centre for Health Protection (CHP) said today.

The 56-year-old man's symptoms began on Mar 31, and he was hospitalized on Apr 4 where he is remains in serious condition. An investigation found that he had been exposed to live domestic poultry before he got sick.

So far, China has reported 13 H5N6 cases for the year, part of ongoing activity that saw a large spike in 2021. H5N6 is known to circulate in poultry in a handful of Asian countries, and infection in humans is often severe or fatal.

The virus was first detected in humans in 2014 and has so far infected 77 people in China. Laos is the only other country that has reported a human case.
Apr 20 CHP statement

 

Avian flu continues to hit wild birds, including raptors, in multiple states [H5N1, the one we're tracking specifically]
Tests on wild birds found dead and in surveillance samples taken from hunter-harvested bird and live birds turned up 98 more positives for highly pathogenic H5 avian influenza, especially in Midwestern states, according to the latest update from the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS).

Many of the latest positive samples were from North Dakota, much of it in wild geese found dead. Other Midwestern states reporting more avian flu in wild birds include Minnesota, South Dakota, Wisconsin, Missouri, and Illinois.

In the East, New Hampshire, Maine, Vermont, Ohio, and Tennessee reported more H5, mostly in waterfowl. In the West, Colorado and Montana reported more positives.

A number of the latest positives across several states included raptors, including bald eagles, hawks, and owls. The University of Minnesota Raptor Center said though waterfowl can carry and shed the virus without symptoms, other birds including chickens and raptors often get severe illness and die. It said the 2022 outbreak is unique due to very high levels of H5N1 circulating in wildlife.

So far, the center has sampled 90 raptors, of which 37 tested positive for highly pathogenic avian flu. Affected birds include great horned owls, bald eagles, red-tailed hawks, and a barred owl.

The Raptor Center has suspended public tours due to rising highly pathogenic flu cases and is urging people who live in high transmission areas to consider pausing the use of bird feeders and baths for the next few months as a way of preventing birds from gathering and the virus from spreading.

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26 minutes ago, Ambergris said:

C TODD DAVIS: Because humans have no prior immunity to these viruses typically, if they were to be infected and spread the virus to other humans, then we could have another pandemic virus on our hands. And so that's our primary concern.

GREENFIELDBOYCE: Besides testing any people who show flu-like symptoms, they're also closely tracking genetic changes in the virus, looking for anything that would suggest it might become more of a threat to people.

I read someplace a few months ago that Bird Flu would be our next human pandemic.  Sigh.

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12 hours ago, Ambergris said:

The 56-year-old man's symptoms began on Mar 31, and he was hospitalized on Apr 4 where he is remains in serious condition. An investigation found that he had been exposed to live domestic poultry before he got sick.

 

I keep telling people not to kiss their chickens on the lips. They've turned them into children.  :0327::whistling:

 

The farm near us is into another phase of having to destroy their 3 million birds. I guess they're now trying to dispose of the eggs ... 400 TONS of them ... but the landfill doesn't want them until after THREE DAYS of cooking them.  :0327::0327:

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April 21:

 

Last week, prices for conventional eggs increased by 40 cents per dozen to $1.47 while cage-free egg prices rose 3 cents to $2.40 per dozen, according to the USDA. Organic eggs, which are from chickens required to have access to the outdoors, were selling for a national average of $4.39 a dozen last week, up from $3.65 the week before.

The price of eggs used by bakeries and other food products hit a record high on April 8.

Breaker eggs, which will later be broken by processors and sold in containers weighing up to 50 pounds, peaked at $2.51 per pound. Many of the egg layers that have died from bird flu were on farms contracted to provide breaker eggs 

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A dozen large eggs weighs about 24 ounces or a pound and a half with shells, or (if my figures are correct) Round $3.75 per dozen for breaker eggs.   
 

By the way, I have seen an organic egg ‘farm’.  Big huge long Morton building with no access to the outside I could see.  They were ‘cage free’ but so crowded they hardly had room to move.  The eggs were laid in nests with conveyor belts to take the eggs directly to another room.  Hens, supposedly, lay more and eat less when it is hot.  It was so hot in the building that the hens had mostly wing and tail feathers and some on their heads.  No others.  The dust was so thick in the building you could not see the other end and had to wear a mask to even enter the outer room where the eggs were sorted by machine.
 

Every 18 to 24 months the hens are all replaced. We got 30 of their ‘old’  ( Red cross link) layers which are usually sold to makers of broth as the hens are little use for meat even after being well fed.  It was cold out and we lost a few before we even got them home.  The others I debated knitting sweaters for but settled for a half dozen heat lamps in a small well insulated and bedded chicken coop.  Those hens never stopped laying.  We did cull 3-4 that did not lay but the others went on to lay almost daily for THREE years.  When we finally butchered them they were still full of ova but had slowed to laying two or three eggs a week.  
 

Organic is not what you might expect. I learned from the owner of that farm that the various names do not always mean healthier, happier, hens. Organic means given feed that is organically grown and no non organic practices are used.  Cage free only means they are not IN cages.  Free range means they are allowed access to the outside but that can be into a small fenced in run and does NOT mean they DO go outside as often the doors are just small chicken sized openings.  Pasture raised means they do have access to pasture daily but that might be only in large cages (so called ‘chicken tractors’) that are moved to fresh graze daily.  Organic, pastured, free range means the hens are allowed to run around free and return to coops at night which are then moved to a new pasture as needed.  
 

With the price of feed today it may or may not be cheaper to raise your own hens but at least you get a choice for how your hens are treated.  

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Layer feed was $13 bag. I gagged. I can still get pastured eggs from the pantry that I work at most weeks. I treat them like the golden eggs.  :). We used to eat very little overseas. My memory is coming back very quickly though. I am starting to like rice again. 3x a day for years gets very old. Just give me a pile of mashed potatoes any day, smothered in butter and sour cream/chives. 😋 

 

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On 4/21/2022 at 5:26 AM, Ambergris said:

keeping birds inside, limiting their exposure to outdoor water sources

 

 

:(  Shoot.  JUST when we decide to raise ducks for eggs and a few geese for surveillance.....   Then again, the price of eggs rising rapidly is WHY we decided to do this again.

 

Hmmm....  They'll be in for several months tho....if we can get a live day-old shipment, that is.  First batch DOA.  :(   Can't remember back to when they get all their feathers and could use the pond.  Not for months yet so if this doesn't drag on and on....?  They'll be safe inside for quite a while.

 

MtRider  :darthduck: 

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The State Vet who is overseeing the destruction of one commercial operation was mentioning all the spring birds using the chicken feathers of the dead birds to build nests.  :0327:

 

Spring is a great time to watch birds find nesting material. When we combed our long-haired dog outside, the birds would come from everywhere. I remember as a child my grandmother cutting lengths of string and hanging them on a fence. The birds would come and use the string as sewing material in their nests.

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