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georgene, alclary, and everyone else...

 

These are the sites and info I was able to find. There are websites, info, and a special bunch of links about the non-profit group "Seed Savers" that I hope you'll explore.

 

Now's the time to sign up on these sites for catalogs!!! They're getting them ready to send out in January... wink

 

 

Nothing like sitting at the table with a mug of hot cocoa going through seed catalogs, dreaming of SPRING!!!! flowersmilie

 

 

I am most familiar with the first five seed companies, and have heard good things about them. The rest, I only found online.

 

I checked all the links; tell me if there's a problem.

 

*****************

 

SEED INFO

 

www.Burpee.com/

 

http://gurneys.com/

 

http://www.parkseed.com/

 

http://www.ferry-morse.com/

 

http://henryfields.com/

 

http://seeds.thompson-morgan.com/us/en

 

http://www.groworganic.com/

 

http://www.heirloomseeds.com/

 

http://www.victoryseeds.com/

 

http://www.cooksgarden.com/

 

http://www.johnnyseeds.com/

 

http://www.territorialseed.com/

 

http://www.kitchengardenseeds.com/.

 

http://gardeners.harrisseeds.com/

 

http://www.seedsofchange.com/

 

http://www.stokeseeds.com/

 

http://www.growitalian.com/ ITALIAN VARIETIES

 

http://www.evergreenseeds.com/ ORIENTAL VEGGIES

 

http://www.seedstrust.com/ HIGH ALTITUDE, NATIVE, ORGANIC

 

http://www.reimerseeds.com/ LOTS OF HOT PEPPERS!

 

http://heirloomtomatoes.bizland.com/ = http://www.tomatobob.com/ TOMATOES

 

http://www.tomatofest.com/ TOMATOES

 

http://www.sweettomatotestgarden.com/ HOT CLIMATE GARDENING - TOMATOES

 

http://www.richters.com/ HERBS

 

http://www.horizonherbs.com/ HERBS

 

http://www.nothyme.com/ HERBS, SCENTED GERANIUMS

 

http://www.wildseedfarms.com/ HERBS, WILDFLOWERS, GRASSES

 

http://www.browningseed.com/ WHEAT, OTHER GRAINS, WILDFLOWERS

 

http://www.selectseeds.com/ FLOWERS

 

http://www.whiteflowerfarm.com/ FLOWERS

 

http://www.dutchgardens.com/ FLOWERS, BULBS

 

http://springhillnursery.com/ FLOWERS, SHRUBS, TREES

 

http://www.waysidegardens.com/ FLOWERS, SHRUBS, TREES

 

http://www.jonsteen.com/ TREES

 

http://www.cabrillonets.com/calplants/ CACTI, HOUSEPLANTS

 

Check out seeds & plants on eBay

 

 

Seed Savers is a non-profit seed exchange and seller of heirloom and organic seed. These links will explain the how, why, and give helpful info about saving seed.

 

http://www.seedsavers.org/

 

ABOUT SEED SAVERS:

http://davesgarden.com/gwd/c/5/ with feedback

 

http://www.americanprofile.com/article/725.html Article on how it began

http://www.americanprofile.com/article/2028.html W. W. Weaver, seed saver

 

http://homepage.tinet.ie/~merlyn/seedsaving.html SEEDSAVING HOW-TO

 

http://www.care2.com/channels/solutions/outdoors/415 WHY SAVING SEEDS IS IMPORTANT

 

 

 

 

http://www.arkinstitute.com/Faqs.htm All about storing seeds, why choosing for your area is important, other info

 

http://www.backwoodshome.com/articles/wolcott61.html Hints for apartment gardening

 

 

http://www.bbc.co.uk/gardening/design/virt...den_index.shtml Design a garden online

 

 

(originally posted by Cat)

 

 

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I ordered some seeds and a soil testing kit for missionary kids in SE Asia for Christmas. They came from Johnny Select Seeds. By the time the package arrived over there, the bottle with the chemicals had come loose and destroyed the testing kit. I emailed Johnny's (in Maine) and they had another one in the mail the next day. Now THAT'S service!!

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  • 3 weeks later...
  • 2 years later...
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  • 1 month later...

I'd like to add Southern Exposure Seed Exchange. They are located in VA, so for the mid-Atlantic region, they are fairly local. I've only ordered from them this year and they were fantastic. I ordered a carrot that was sold out. They refunded my money and sent me a different type of carrot to try out. Shipping was extremely fast also. I will definately buy from them again.

 

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I received a big order of seeds today. It came from a place, I haven't heard anyone mention, but the service was PDQ and I was able to track the package to my door. It was Seed Warehouse at www.vegetableseedwarehouse.com.They are located in Carnesville, Georgia. I couldn't believe how quickly they serviced my order and each packet, has planting instructions, including when to wait to plant. I bought:

 

Big Red Bell Peppers

California Wonder Bell Peppers

Golden California Wonder Bell Peppers

Pimento Peppers

Sweet banana Peppers

Early Jalapeno Hot Peppers

Broccoli Raab

Green Globe Artichokes

Waltham Broccoli

All Season Cabbage

Bok Choi/Pak choi Chinese Cabbage

michihili Chinese Cabbage

Red Acre Cabbage

Eden Gem Honeydew

Georgia Southern Collards

Armenian Cucumbers

SMR 58 Pickling Cucumbers

Dill Bouquet

Moss Curled Parsley

Oregano

Sage

Italian Flat Parsley

Sweet Marjoram

Tom Thumb Lettuce

Tendergreen Mustard Green

Harris Model Parsnip

New England/Sugar Pie Pumpkin

Black Beauty Squash

Cocozelle Squash Crookneck Squash

Round Zucchini Squash

Straightneck Squash

Table Queen Acorn Squash

Burgess Buttercup Squash

Waltham Butternut Squash

Spaghetti Squash

Ruby Red Swiss Chard

Purple Top White Globe Turnips

Japanese White Hulless Popcorn

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If you haven't planted Tendergreen before, you're in for a surprise. I have never seen anything sprout and leaf out as fast as that does. I sometimes put an old floorless birdcage in my chicken yard and sprinkle Tendergreen seeds on the bare ground. A week later, the hens have shouldered aside the cage and ravished the mustard. The yolks become substantially deeper yellow. I was advised to do this with millet, but the Tendergreen is much faster and more satisfying.

 

Edited to add: I water them in good.

Edited by Ambergris
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If you haven't planted Tendergreen before, you're in for a surprise. I have never seen anything sprout and leaf out as fast as that does. I sometimes put an old floorless birdcage in my chicken yard and sprinkle Tendergreen seeds on the bare ground. A week later, the hens have shouldered aside the cage and ravished the mustard. The yolks become substantially deeper yellow. I was advised to do this with millet, but the Tendergreen is much faster and more satisfying.

 

Yippee! The faster, the better! I'm glad I bought a big bag of this!

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  • 9 months later...

Native Seeds/SEARCH (Southwest Endangered Aridlands Resource Clearing House)

 

http://www.nativeseeds.org

 

From the website: Native Seeds/SEARCH conserves, distributes and documents the adapted and diverse varieties of agricultural seeds, their wild relatives and the role these seeds play in cultures of the American Southwest and northwest Mexico. We promote the use of these ancient crops and their wild relatives by gathering, safeguarding, and distributing their seeds to farming and gardening communities. We also work to preserve knowledge about their uses.

They are a non-profit conservation organization, not a commercial seed company. As such, they carry only desert/arid-lands adapted varieties, those grown for years by local or native peoples. They also carry only traditional seeds. While you'll find tomatillos, chiles, cotton, devil's claw, tomatoes, beans, watermelon, amaranth, squash, indigo, etc there (all grown for hundreds of years in the area), you won't find species that require large amounts of water or soil that isn't local. As examples, they don't carry egglplant, carrots, broccoli, beets, or asparagus.

Seed packets are $3 each, shipping at this time is $3.50 for the first 5 packets, 35c for each additional packet. Seeds are adapted to Southwestern United States and Northwestern Mexico. Seeds are suited for dry conditions, alkali soils, and short growing seasons.

 

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  • 2 months later...

I found a small seed company that offers heirloom, non GMO seeds at Seeds Now.com or Seed Survivalist.com. Their seeds are organic but they are not yet certified and can not advertise them as such. With more interest in seeds, order early.

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Thanks! Looking at the Baker Creek one in a few.

 

Gofish~ Are they open to the public to go in? That's about a 75 minute drive for us and I know that area well.

 

Gave my midwife the mail order forms for 2 of my catalogs for heirlooms, yesterday.

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  • 1 month later...

Has anyone bought/used the bulk seed container this site sells?

 

http://www.emergencyseedbank.com/

 

The bundle includes: "23 varieties of highest yielding crops. Some 37,000 seeds total enough to plant 1-acre victory garden." The cost is $139, +S&H I assume.

 

The guy who operates it guarantees his seeds and offers a 365 Day/110% money back guarantee.

 

Sounds real good, and would like some feedback before I make any kind of investment like this.

 

Also, does anyone know of a high-yielding corn? I have a relatively small area to plant and would like something that gives more than 2-3 ears per stalk. Any planting suggestions would be welcome too.

Edited by DonsCountryGal
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Has anyone bought/used the bulk seed container this site sells?

 

http://www.emergencyseedbank.com/

 

The bundle includes: "23 varieties of highest yielding crops. Some 37,000 seeds total enough to plant 1-acre victory garden." The cost is $139, +S&H I assume.

 

The guy who operates it guarantees his seeds and offers a 365 Day/110% money back guarantee.

 

Sounds real good, and would like some feedback before I make any kind of investment like this.

 

Also, does anyone know of a high-yielding corn? I have a relatively small area to plant and would like something that gives more than 2-3 ears per stalk. Any planting suggestions would be welcome too.

 

 

I haven't tried that particular seed package before but I am kinda skeptical. If there really was an emergency where you needed to use your emergency seed bank, chances are you wouldn't be able to track the company down in the event that the seeds didn't germinate. So in that sense, the warranty on the seeds doesn't really mean much.

 

I already had a lot of seeds, but I didn't let that keep me from buying more this year. I ordered from this company:

 

http://www.america-t...seeds/index.php

 

I spent about $30 and got hundreds of packets of seeds from various companies. While you cannot specify the exact types that you get, you can specify what percentage you want in flower seeds or herbs or veggies. I got 300 seed packs for that price. Lots of different varieties of tomatoes, beans, peas, eggplant, peppers, etc...Since setting up my greenhouse a couple of weeks ago, I can vouch for the fact that the seeds seem to be viable and almost every variety that I've planted has sprouted. For veggies that we don't eat, I just donate those to our summer youth gardening program. I also donate some of the flower seeds to our neighborhood association. Last weekend, I took my big tote bin of seeds to my parents' house and let them choose a few varieties for their garden. I will definitely do this again next year.

Edited by themartianchick
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Has anyone bought/used the bulk seed container this site sells?

 

http://www.emergencyseedbank.com/

 

The bundle includes: "23 varieties of highest yielding crops. Some 37,000 seeds total – enough to plant 1-acre victory garden." The cost is $139, +S&H I assume.

 

The guy who operates it guarantees his seeds and offers a 365 Day/110% money back guarantee.

 

Sounds real good, and would like some feedback before I make any kind of investment like this.

 

Also, does anyone know of a high-yielding corn? I have a relatively small area to plant and would like something that gives more than 2-3 ears per stalk. Any planting suggestions would be welcome too.

 

Most of these collections are ripoffs. Say you have room to plant eight of these kinds of seeds, and half fail utterly, while only a quarter do well. You're more likely to get a refund of only the percentage of the whole package that failed, rather than the percentage of planted seeds that failed. Meanwhile, what kind of time, space, effort, and soil amendment expenses have you run up, with no hope of refund? Say this collection has onions. Are they long-day onions (suited for northern latitudes where summer days are very long) or short day onions (suited to latitudes like most of the Deep South, close to the Equator)? Or do they include both, meaning hundreds or thousands of onion seeds that will be useless to you? There are day-neutral onions, but they don't do nearly as well as onions tailored to day-length. Also, consider whether the person meant highest yielding per plant, or per square foot/yard. A vine that rambles all over the place might produce twice as much as a bushy vine that doesn't take up but a third of that space. Which works better for your situation?

 

"Highest yielding" normally means hybrid. I strongly recommend some hybrid seed for an emergency garden, simply because the chances of producing enough food to pay for the space and inputs (work, fertilizer) are much higher. I also recommend some open-pollinated (heirloom) seed for sustainability. You just don't plant your heirlooms to compete with your hybrids--if you plant hybrid cucumbers, no heirloom cucumbers but you can plant heirloom tomatoes.

 

For high(er) yield without going the hybrid route, find a catalog that specializes in seeds for your climate, and choose what you will actually grow, store, and eat. Johnny's is the first go-to catalog for New England, while Southern Seed Savers is better suited to Georgia growers, and Native Seed Search for the Southwest.

 

Another route is to find smaller seed collections tailored to your desires. I have been very happy with the Botanikka collections, some of which you can design yourself. http://stores.ebay.com/mnrsales For seeds specially packed for storage, look at Park's with its little foil inner envelopes. Parks sells heirloom and hybrid, but no GMO. This is the Park's seed site with "assortment" typed in. http://www.parkseed.com/gardening/store/TextSearch?storeId=10101&SearchUnion=Y&CustSearchText=assortment&x=0&y=0

 

For a first garden, or a first garden in a new climate, I would never suggest trying more than six kinds of crop. Fewer is better. When you get an eye for what those plants look like happy and unhappy, and how to cure the unhappiness, you can expand. In my area, for the summer, I'd suggest summer squash, okra, eggplant, cherry tomatoes, and peppers for a planting guaranteed to weather any gardening errors. In other areas, green beans and Irish potatoes might be better bets.

 

Two to three ears per stalk is very high-yielding for ordinary corn. I've heard of six-shooter corn with six ears, but I've never actually seen it growing. Do you want feed corn, popcorn, baby corn, or sweet corn? Baby corn you get many ears per stalk, but of course they're only as big as a man's thumb. You might want to redefine the question from ears per stalk to ears per square yard. The smaller corn varieties, that only go 4-5 feet tall, have smaller ears but can crowd more stalks to the square yard than types with stalks twice as tall.

Edited by Ambergris
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